Havana Syndrome continues to baffle U.S. officials

Havana Syndrome continues to baffle U.S. officials

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By Joseph Clark

The Washington Times

Friday, October 1, 2021

U.S. officials remain determined to get to the bottom of mysterious, neurological “anomalous health incidents” which have befallen a growing number of diplomats, military personnel and intelligence officials.

Senior leaders in the Biden administration have ramped up efforts to treat those with the mysterious symptoms, which a December National Academy of Sciences report said “are consistent with the effects of directed, pulsed radiofrequency (RF) energy.”

The suspected attacks — causing what’s known as Havana Syndrome, after a rash of reports from U.S. Embassy staff in Cuba — cause often debilitating symptoms, including vertigo and headaches, that can last years. Many suspect the attacks are from a microwave or directed-energy weapon.

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Congress, too, has stepped up its efforts, passing legislation this month to provide financial assistance to victims.

But as for definitively pinning down the source and who may be responsible, the U.S. remains baffled. 

“I feel, still, a strong degree of humility about being able to give you a best guess, because it could be completely wrong,” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, California Democrat, told reporters last week.

Mr. Schiff said the U.S. government has not ruled anything out in terms of who or what may be causing the incidents. He said not all of the reported incidents may be “attributable to the same cause.”

“At the same time, the seriousness of the injuries and the proliferating nature of these anomalies demands are full, for the deployment of resources across the government to find out,” he said.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken and CIA Director William J. Burns have both made firm commitments to determining the cause, and ensuring victims are cared for.

“This was one of the few issues that Secretary Blinken asked to have added to his roster of briefings, even before he was sworn in,” a State Department spokesperson said Friday. “He wanted to make sure that we get a full understanding of where we were in terms of understanding anomalous health incidents, and what more we needed to do.”

Mr. Blinken remains personally engaged in the matter and has appointed a senior official to oversee the State Department’s work alongside the National Security Council, the Department of Defense and the intelligence community to continue to press for answers.

Mr. Burns told NPR in July that the attacks on CIA personnel were among his top priorities.

“I’m certainly persuaded that what our officers and some family members, as well as other U.S. government employees, have experienced is real, and it’s serious,” Mr. Burns told NPR. “I am absolutely determined … to get to the bottom of the question of what and who caused this.”

In August, Mr. Burns recalled the chief of station in Vienna after agency officials determined he did not adequately address multiple anomalous health incidents in Austria.

Earlier this month, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin urged service members to come forward if they experience any symptoms.

“As part of a government-wide effort, the Department is committed to finding the cause and the source of these AHI and ensuring that affected individuals receive appropriate medical care as possible when needed,” Mr. Austin said in a memo. 

Some estimate that more than 200 officials have been targeted in the attacks, which have affected officials from the State Department, the Defense Department and the Central Intelligence Agency.

Since the initial diagnoses in 2016, the number of U.S. officials around the globe reporting symptoms, including on U.S. soil, has continued to swell.

In May, reports revealed information about two U.S. officials struck by Havana syndrome near the White House.

In August, a “possible anomalous health incident” — which some believed to be a Havana syndrome case — was reported by the U.S. Embassy in Hanoi and briefly delayed Vice President Kamala D. Harris’ trip to Vietnam.

Earlier this month, a CIA officer reported symptoms while traveling in India, at the same time Mr. Burns was in the country.

When the incidents first began being reported, several officials said their cases were dismissed by leadership within the State Department and CIA, and that the government denied them access to medical treatment for the symptoms. In some cases, the victims were forced to end their service due to the injuries they sustained, which they said were ignored.

In an early investigation into the rash of reports from the U.S. embassy in Cuba, the State Department in 2018 commissioned a study by the JASON advisory group, which investigated sounds recorded by victims who suffered from anomalous health incidents in Havana.

The report, a declassified version of which was published Thursday by Buzzfeed, paints a picture of the uphill battle early victims faced.

In its report, JASON concluded that the recorded sounds were “mechanical or biological in origin, rather than electronic” and not consistent with a microwave energy attack. The report also concluded that “a possible explanation for the reported symptoms is a psychogenic illness,” though it stopped short of declaring a targeted attack by a bad actor.

The State Department has since dismissed the 2018 study, according to a spokesperson who said the report exhibits several shortcomings, including reliance on scant data and a lack of “broad access to information and effective personnel necessary to fully understand such a complex issue.” The researchers behind the JASON report interviewed only one person who had reported symptoms commonly associated with anomalous health incidents.

“And it was because of the flaws and shortcomings in prior studies including this one, that we have focused on sharing information across departments and agencies and making all of that data available to the [intelligence community’s] expert panel,” he said.

The State Department spokesperson said the JASON report is not “aligned with this administration’s understanding” of the anomalous health incidents and has not “informed” the government’s more recent inquiry into the matter.

“I think we’ve made a lot of improvements in terms of how the government, the whole government, is treating those who are suffering from these anomalies,” Mr. Schiff said.

But Mr. Schiff says there are still questions to be answered. He said he still thinks there could be a variety of causes behind the symptoms.

“These attacks, there’s certainly many of them that seem quite deliberate and what the causes and what the motivation is, what the intent is — I think these are still very much open questions,” he said. “But I do think that we are getting closer to some of the answers, and bringing new tools to bear to help us get those answers.”

Mr. Schiff said he is still open to the possibility that Havana Syndrome is not a result of targeted attacks.

But, he said, “if a nation-state actor is behind it or more than one nation-state actor, and these are deliberate attacks where their efforts are undertaken with the knowledge that they’re causing people physical injury, I’m also confident there’ll be very serious repercussions.”

Congress commits to helping victims of mysterious attacks causing Havana syndrome

Congress commits to helping victims of mysterious attacks causing Havana syndrome

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By Joseph Clark

The Washington Times

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

The House unanimously passed legislation Tuesday to provide financial support to victims of suspected directed energy attacks, which have targeted U.S. officials around the globe, including on American soil.

The bill, known as the Helping Victims Afflicted by Neurological Attacks (HAVANA) Act of 2021 — the attacks cause what’s known as Havana syndrome — passed unanimously in the Senate in June and now proceeds to the White House for President Biden’s expected signature.

The attacks which began targeting U.S. Embassy staff in Cuba in 2016, can cause debilitating symptoms including vertigo and headaches that can last years. Many suspect the attacks are from a microwave or directed energy weapon.

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Some estimate that more than 200 officials have been targeted in the attacks, which have targeted officials from the State Department, the Defense Department and the Central Intelligence Agency.

Since the initial diagnoses in 2016, the number of U.S. officials around the globe reporting symptoms, including on U.S. soil, has continued to swell.

In May, reports revealed information about two U.S. officials struck by Havana syndrome near the White House.

In August, a “possible anomalous health incident” which some believed to be a Havana syndrome case reported by the U.S. Embassy in Hanoi briefly delayed Vice President Kamala D. Harris’ trip to Vietnam.

Earlier this month, a CIA officer reported symptoms while traveling in India at the same time CIA Director William Burns was in the country.

The State Department, CIA, and Pentagon have all started investigations into the suspected attacks, and the National Security Council is leading a broad inquiry into the attacks across government agencies.

No official determination has been made as to the cause or who may be behind it, but some lawmakers have said they suspect the attacks have been by Russia.

In the lead-up to President Biden’s summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin this summer, Sen. Susan Collins, Maine Republican, called on Mr. Biden to press Mr. Putin on the attacks.

“I hope that when President Biden meets with President Putin, that he will ask President Putin about these attacks, that he will grill him about them to see if the Russians are responsible,” said Ms. Collins, a member of the Senate intelligence committee and a sponsor of the Havana Act.

Marc Polymeropoulos, a senior CIA case officer who retired in 2019 after battling debilitating symptoms stemming from a suspected directed energy attack while in his hotel room during a routine trip to Moscow in 2017, told The Times in June that he has little doubt Russia is behind the attacks.

Rep. Adam Schiff, House intelligence committee chairman and another bill sponsor, called the legislation an important step in assisting victims of the attacks as the U.S. government continues to determine who is responsible.

“There is no higher priority than protecting our people. None,” the California Democrat said Tuesday on Twitter. “As we examine the cause of the illness known as Havana Syndrome, we must ensure those impacted get the care they deserve.”

U.S. aims start to Bali bombing war crimes case at Guantanamo

U.S. aims start to Bali bombing war crimes case at Guantanamo

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By Ben Fox

Associated Press

Monday, August 30, 2021

NAVAL STATION GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba (AP) — Three prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay detention center are expected to get their first day in court after being held for 18 years in connection with the deadly 2002 Bali nightclub bombings and other plots in Southeast Asia.

Indonesian prisoner Encep Nurjaman, known as Hambali, and two Malaysians are to be arraigned Monday before a military commission on charges that include murder, conspiracy and terrorism. It is merely the first step in what could be a long legal journey for a case that involves evidence tainted by CIA torture, the same issue that is largely responsible for causing other war crimes cases to languish for years at Guantanamo.

The hearing also comes as the Biden administration says it intends to close the detention center, where the U.S. still holds 39 of the 779 men seized in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and invasion of Afghanistan.

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The three men charged in connection with the nightclub bombings were held in secret CIA confinement for three years, followed by 15 more at the isolated U.S. base in Cuba.

The decision to charge them was made by a Pentagon legal official at the end of the Trump administration, complicating the effort to close the detention center, said Brian Bouffard, a lawyer for Mohammed Nazir bin Lep, one of the Malaysian men.

That made it more difficult for the new administration to add any to the list of those who could potentially be transferred out of Guantanamo or even sent home. “It will even be harder after an arraignment,” Bouffard said.

Whether the arraignment would actually take place was not certain. Lawyers have sought to put the case on hold for a number of reasons, including what they have said is insufficient access to interpreters and other resources to mount a defense. The accused were still expected to show up for the hearing.

The Navy judge presiding over the case in the commission, a hybrid of military and civilian law, is expected to consider that question before the charges can be formally presented in a secure courtroom surrounded by coils of razor wire on the base. 

Nurjaman was a leader of Jemaah Islamiyah, a Southeast Asian militant group with ties to al-Qaida. The U.S. government says he recruited militants, including bin Lep and the other Malaysian charged in the case, Mohammed Farik bin Amin, for jihadist operations. 

Among the plots that al-Qaida and Jemaah Islamiyah carried out were the October 2002 suicide bombings of Paddy’s Pub and the Sari Club in Bali, Indonesia, and the August 2003 suicide bombing of the J.W. Marriott in Jakarta, Indonesia. The attacks together killed 213 people, including seven Americans, and injured 109 people, including six Americans. Dozens of victims were foreign tourists, mostly Australians.

Prosecutors allege bin Lep and the other Malaysian, Mohammed Farik bin Amin, served as intermediaries in the transfer of money used to fund the group’s operations. 

All three were captured in Thailand in 2003 and transferred to CIA “black sites,” where they were brutalized and subjected to torture, according to a Senate Intelligence Committee report released in 2014. In 2006, they were moved to Guantanamo. 

It’s unclear why it’s taken so long to charge them before the military commission. Military prosecutors filed charges against the men in June 2017, but the Pentagon legal official who oversees Guantanamo cases rejected the charges for reasons that haven’t been publicly disclosed.

The case has many elements that make it complex, including whether statements the men made to authorities can hold up in court because of the abuse they experienced in CIA custody, the fact that people have already been convicted, and in some cases executed, in Indonesia for the attack, and the long time it has taken to even bring charges — much less get to a trial at some point in the future.

Some of these same issues have come up in the case against five Guantanamo prisoners charged for planning and aiding the Sept. 11 attacks. They were arraigned in May 2012 and remain in the pretrial phase, with no trial date yet scheduled. 

Bin Amin’s lawyer, Christine Funk, predicted a lengthy period of defense investigation that will require extensive travel, once the pandemic is over, to interview witnesses and look for evidence. Still, she said, her client is “anxious and eager to litigate this case and go home.”

U.S. intel officials rely on private sector for artificial intelligence to outcompete China

U.S. intel officials rely on private sector for artificial intelligence to outcompete China

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By Ryan Lovelace

The Washington Times

Monday, July 12, 2021

The intelligence community officials say they are turning to the private sector to make advances in artificial intelligence deemed necessary to out-compete China and other adversarial nations.

The Chinese Communist Party has utilized state-led industrial policies, such as its Made in China 2025 plan, to pursue a technological edge over the U.S. in artificial intelligence (AI). By contrast, the U.S. is seeking to benefit from the innovation produced by the private sector that is incentivized by an open market.

The federal government has served as the primary creator and lead innovator in several technological fields but needs to be a ‘fast follower’ of industry in artificial intelligence, Neal Higgins, the CIA associate deputy director of digital innovation, said at an event hosted by The Cipher Brief.

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“We need to partner with industry to identify the innovation that’s occurring in the private sector and put ourselves in a position where we can identify those best-agreed, commercially available solutions that are already out there and bring them into our ecosystem as quickly as possible,” he said. “At CIA, we have opened unclassified facilities in Silicon Valley and Northern Virginia-Dulles corridor where we can go out and meet with companies with a focus on [artificial intelligence-machine learning] in an unclassified environment, removing some of the hurdles to working with the [intelligence community].”

The CIA also is trying to leverage its outposts in Northern Virginia and Silicon Valley amid the agency’s migration to cloud computing to capitalize on the private sector’s ingenuity, he said.

Mr. Higgins’ directorate at CIA is the agency’s newest directorate, having formed in 2015. The intelligence community has taken new steps in recent years to accelerate tech transfer between the government and private sector.

Last September, the CIA announced it formed its first federal lab that would give officers the ability to get patents and licenses for the products they create. Earlier this year, the intelligence community’s strategic investor, In-Q-Tel, created a new program to make the intelligence community’s products commercially available.

Mr. Higgins said China has made ‘large strides’ in artificial intelligence enhanced by fewer restrictions on its actions but argued that the U.S. is “staying ahead of all of our international partners and competitors” in the AI realm.

At the event, the National Security Agency’s Jason Wang noted that the global competition against China in artificial intelligence was not yet dire but “very dynamic” and said the government needed to take action to ensure it was not left behind.

“We are still young in this as an enterprise, and really where we are looking next is how we can drive effective human-machine teaming,” said Mr. Wang.

The problem of human-machine teaming refers to the challenge of having personnel capable and authorized to analyze the overwhelming flow of information collected by the intelligence community.

The federal government is awash in data and it risks becoming a tidal wave too large to handle, according to Rachael Martin, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency director of artificial intelligence, automation & augmentation.

“We are rapidly approaching the point where asking for more information does nothing because we can barely manage to process the information that we have,” she said at the event. “So for us, AI isn’t something that we need to do, it’s something that we have to do if we’re going to be able to meet mission in the future and hold adversaries at risk.”

Ms. Martin said America will be successful in winning the race for dominance in artificial intelligence if “nobody cares about AI” in the coming decades.

“AI, I hope, in 10 or 15 years should be like electricity, right?” Ms. Martin said. “It’s something that we all know, we all have it, we use it. Well, we’re not really worried about it because we know it works and we know we have access to it, and we understand how it gets to our building.”

Once people get comfortable with AI all around them akin to electricity powering the world around them, then the U.S. has achieved a successful AI strategy, according to Ms. Martin.

Congress created the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence to help chart a successful AI strategy for the nation in a 2018 defense bill. The commission, chaired by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, published a final report earlier this year urging U.S. leaders to spend billions of taxpayer dollars prioritizing AI innovation now lest the government risk falling behind China.

CIA victim of ‘Havana Syndrome’ blames Kremlin: ‘Russians are very aggressive’ against U.S. gov’t

CIA victim of ‘Havana Syndrome’ blames Kremlin: ‘Russians are very aggressive’ against U.S. gov’t

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By Joseph Clark

The Washington Times

Thursday, June 3, 2021

Marc Polymeropoulos was a senior CIA case officer on a routine visit to Moscow in 2017 when he awoke in his hotel room with a severe case of vertigo.

His first inclination was that he had food poisoning and that the symptoms would soon wear off. Instead, it was the beginning of a brain-rattling affliction that would last for years and eventually force him out of the CIA.

“It’s incredibly unsettling,” Mr. Polymeropoulos said of that night. “The room was spinning. I couldn’t stand up. I was falling over. I felt like I was going to be physically sick. I had ringing in my ears. And so I knew something pretty significant had happened.”

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Mr. Polymeropoulos had fallen victim to Havana syndrome, a debilitating affliction that U.S. Embassy staff suffered in 2016 in Cuba. The mysterious symptoms “are consistent with the effects of directed, pulsed radio frequency (RF) energy,” said a National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine report published in December.

Many believe the syndrome is a result of attacks with a microwave weapon or directed energy device, but the U.S. intelligence community doesn’t officially know any more now than it did five years ago.

After the diagnoses of more than 40 cases from Havana, the number of U.S. officials around the globe reporting symptoms, including on U.S. soil, swelled to 130.

Last month, reports revealed information about two U.S. officials struck by Havana syndrome near the White House.

Mr. Polymeropoulos said he believes Russia is behind the affliction because it has the capability to carry out such attacks and many of the officials affected have been involved in Russian operations. He said the attacks seem to be in line with Russia’s treatment of U.S. diplomats.

“There has been a long line of U.S. officials who have developed some pretty severe health symptoms after serving in Moscow,” he said. “That’s something that is worth looking into again as well. Whether it’s the old kind of signals intelligence systems that were turned up too high or the old spy dust, you know, the Russians are very aggressive against U.S. government personnel.”

Nonetheless, he said, this is just his theory. He is not involved in the investigation into the matter and has no insight into the classified discussions about the cases of Havana syndrome.

U.S. diplomats in China also had episodes.

The House and Senate intelligence committees recently held closed-door hearings on Havana syndrome. Representatives from both committees declined to comment on the closed discussions, but a spokesperson for Sen. Mark R. Warner, Virginia Democrat and chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, said the senator “welcomes the IC’s renewed focus on these mysterious attacks and that he’ll continue to work with the IC to understand the cause and the attribution.”

In a joint statement after the hearing, Mr. Warner and committee Vice Chairman Marco Rubio, Florida Republican, vowed to find the culprit.

“Ultimately, we will identify those responsible for these attacks on American personnel and will hold them accountable,” they said.

The State Department, CIA and Pentagon have all started investigations. The National Security Council has begun leading what it called a whole-of-government inquiry into the anomalies. No official determination has been made as to the cause or who may be behind it.

“The Intelligence Community is taking these anomalous health incidents (AHI) very seriously and is committed to investigating the source of these incidents, preventing them from continuing, and caring for those affected,” said a spokesperson for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. “As of now, we have no definitive information about the cause of these incidents, and it is premature and irresponsible to speculate.”

The intelligence community has not determined whether a foreign actor is responsible but the spy agencies have redoubled their efforts in recent months, the spokesman said.

Mr. Polymeropoulos said he understands why intelligence officials are taking a methodic approach. For him, however, supporting those affected by the attacks takes priority.

Because of little understanding of these attacks, Mr. Polymeropoulos said, he endured a long journey to receive the treatment he needed.

After spending most of his career as a case officer in the Middle East, he said, he did not expect a career-ending attack on his trip to Moscow — especially from within the walls of his five-star hotel near the U.S. Embassy. The symptoms persisted, even after he returned to the U.S., so he knew he had experienced something more serious than food poisoning. 

He reported his symptoms to the CIA‘s office of medical services soon after returning.

“I couldn’t even go to work for more than several hours a day because of the headaches, the dizziness and the brain fog,” he said.

With no treatment available to him, Mr. Polymeropoulos decided to retire from the agency in 2019 and, still seeking treatment, hired a lawyer to press the agency.

“I want nothing more than to get to Walter Reed,” he said he told his attorney and other senior former agency officials who weighed in on his behalf. “And that was communicated to the CIA very specifically. And it worked.”

He said he had no interest in receiving a financial settlement. He just wanted treatment, which the agency refused.

In October, Mr. Polymeropoulos took an unusual step for someone who led an entire career in the shadows. He approached GQ journalist Julia Ioffe to make his case public.

He told the CIA he would do so and said the agency was not surprised, but he did not make the decision lightly after a 26-year career.

“It caused me a lot of stress and anxiety. A lot of people I work with, my former colleagues, were very upset with me and certainly shunned me after that.”

But ultimately, it worked.

The published story put enough public pressure on the CIA to send him to a monthlong program at Walter Reed’s National Intrepid Center of Excellence, he said.

When he arrived, he carried not only the symptoms from the attack but also persistent anxiety, which he blamed on skepticism about his story. The program helped him deal with the headaches and with what he described as the moral injury of feeling shunned.

He felt his claims were finally validated.

Mr. Polymeropoulos chalks up the agency’s denials to what he describes as a leadership failure on the part of the office of medical services. He said CIA Director William J. Burns pledged in his confirmation hearing to prioritize the attacks, and the agency has established a task force to further examine the incidents.

“I think he just understands leadership,” Mr. Polymeropoulos said of Mr. Burns. “I was asked to do some really unique things by the U.S. government as a CIA Operations Officer, but I always knew that you have this pact with leadership that they would have my back if something went wrong. And they really didn’t. And I think he understands that they should have.”

Mr. Polymeropoulos also credits lawmakers for beginning an inquiry into the incidents and for taking the claims seriously.

Sens. Susan M. Collins, Maine Republican, Jeanne Shaheen, New Hampshire Democrat, Mr. Warner and Mr. Rubio introduced the Helping American Victims Afflicted by Neurological Attacks (HAVANA) Act last month to provide financial support to those injured by the attacks.

“This is the way the system is supposed to work,” Mr. Polymeropoulos said about congressional oversight. “I think it’s an effort to kind of right some wrongs that were done. I and others who’ve been affected are incredibly grateful to the senators and House members on both sides of the aisle.”

For CIA, protecting defectors is a daunting task

For CIA, protecting defectors from retaliation is a daunting task

Chinese defectors face assassination fears, former case officer says

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This April 13, 2016 file photo shows the seal of the Central Intelligence Agency at CIA headquarters in Langley, Va. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File) **FILE** more >

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By Bill Gertz

The Washington Times

Tuesday, June 1, 2021

It’s a service that not many people know the country’s premier intelligence service even offers: The CIA is quietly providing lifetime security for several hundred high-value defectors who worked secretly for the United States and fled Russia, China and other hostile states, says the former head of the CIA’s defector resettlement program.

Joseph Augustyn, who spent 28 years in the agency’s clandestine service before retiring in 2004, said in an interview that most defectors who enter the CIA’s covert security and resettlement program change their names and quietly adapt to a new life.

Those who don’t risk assassination and at least one, former Russian KGB Col. Alexander Zaporozhsky, was conned by a Moscow intelligence operation into returning to Russia where he was promptly arrested and sentenced to prison labor.

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“In the defector operations center, we had the crown jewels of CIA spies,” Mr. Augustyn told The Washington Times. “And we’re responsible for them for life.”

Unlike the witness protection program run by the U.S. Marshals Service, the CIA does not kick out those that fail to follow the rules.

Under a 1949 law, the CIA can bring in up to 100 defectors and their families a year, although it is unlikely the agency ever reached that limit. The program is populated with Russians, Chinese, North Koreans, Iraqis and others. Most are men but the list includes some women spies who were rescued and resettled.

“Over the years we have several hundred open cases,” Mr. Augustyn recalled. “They don’t go away. Some get more attention than others but in our stable we have high hundreds of cases that are open for CIA monitoring.”

A CIA spokeswoman declined to comment.

Revenge attacks by Russian agents on defectors in Britain have given the CIA resettlement program new attention. Moscow agents are accused of poisoning KGB defector Alexander Litvinenko in 2006, and tried to kill another defector, Sergei Skripal in 2018.

The attacks were linked to Russian President Vladimir Putin, a former KGB officer. “Putin hates traitors,” Mr. Augustyn said, noting that those under CIA protection are right to be concerned about their safety.

One of the Russian defectors who decided against changing his name was Oleg Smolenkov, a Kremlin aide who fled Russia with his family in 2017 and was resettled in Stafford, Virginia.

In 2019, CNN, without naming Mr. Smolenkov, reported that a key aide to Putin was “exfiltrated” from Russia two years earlier. Moscow promptly identified the reported spy as Mr. Smolenkov, forcing him to flee his Virginia home.

Mr. Augustyn said every defector taken in poses security concerns, but that so far the CIA has been very successful in keeping those under its care safe. That’s not to say there haven’t been some close calls related to defectors being traced and tracked down, he noted.

KGB Col. Aleksandr Poteyev, who headed Moscow’s deep cover “illegals” agent program, began working for the CIA around 1999 and after his defection was nearly tracked down by Russian agents in Florida after using his real name to purchase a fishing license. Mr. Poteyev helped the FBI uncover a network of 10 KGB illegals in 2010, including Ana Chapman.

China threat

While Russia is a main security threat, “we worry about the Chinese as well,” Mr. Augustyn said.

All of China’s valuable defectors who were handled by the CIA’s resettlement center agreed to change their identity over concerns about the long reach of Beijing’s intelligence agents, who are known to operate in covert teams dubbed “fox hunt” operations.

“I have met and known several of the Chinese [defectors]. They’re more cautious than the Russians, frankly, in terms of their fearfulness of retribution,” Mr. Augustyn said.

The CIA cannot force defectors to change their names and adopt new identities, but strongly urges them to do so to avoid being attacked or kidnapped. Some defectors oppose changing their names out of respect for their ancestors or family, but place themselves at greater risk by doing so.

The fact that none of the Chinese defectors refused to change their names shows they face real danger from Beijing.

“They’re very cautious. They’re very aware because the Chinese community — through the universities, the Confucius Centers, it’s not hard to find these people if you’re [living under your real] name,” Mr. Augustyn said of the Chinese spies.

The Chinese Ministry of State Security, the civilian intelligence service, and other intelligence agencies so far have not been able to penetrate the security and reach any of the defectors.

Court papers in the case of Chinese double-agent Katrina Leung, who posed as an FBI informant while secretly working for Beijing, revealed Chinese hit teams based in Hong Kong are prepared to conduct operations against defectors or others wanted by Beijing when ordered by government leaders.

Chinese teams that hunt for defectors are “very serious” and unlike Russian assassins are less concerned about maintaining plausible deniability, Mr. Augustyn said.

“If they have the opportunity, they are going to take the hit,” he said. “They are going to pull the trigger. So I worry about the Chinese.”

Michael Pillsbury, a Chinese expert, revealed in his book “Hundred-Year Marathon” that the number of Chinese defectors increased after the 1989 massacre of Chinese pro-democracy protesters by military troops in Tiananmen Square.

Mr. Pillsbury said among the many high-level defectors from China, he has known “the Big Six” — six former officials who proved to be valuable sources of intelligence on the Chinese government and the ruling Communist Party.

One high-level Chinese defector made modest demands for his cooperation — political asylum, a new name, a house, and a decent-paying job.

“And, of course, a cover story that would convince Chinese intelligence that he was dead,” Mr. Pillsbury stated.

That defector, described by Mr. Pillsbury only as “Mr. White,” disclosed the identities of Chinese spies in the United States, details of a secret telephone system used by Chinese leaders, and documents that allowed American intelligence agencies to identify fake material from legitimate information.

The Chinese defector’s main contribution was revealing an internal power struggle among senior China’s leaders.

Mr. Augustyn, a former CIA station chief with wide global experience in the spy business, said defectors are not the object of CIA operations. Ideally, those who work with the agency do so discreetly and retire quietly in their countries of origin.

It is when things go bad that they must be rescued, brought to the United States, and protected.

Mixed motives

Most of the defectors Mr. Augustyn encountered were motivated less by ideology than by a personal grievance, many times related to their intelligence or military work. Nearly all seek adequate compensation, but many also want good schooling and education for their families, a factor especially sought by many Chinese defectors.

One of the CIA’s crown jewels among defectors was Polish Col. Ryszard Kuklinski, who Mr. Augustyn met frequently for lunch. Kuklinski passed top-secret Soviet documents to the CIA from 1972 to 1981, including Moscow’s plans for an invasion of Western Europe.

The Polish defector lived out his new post-defection life in Florida before dying of a stroke in 2004. He remained out of reach of Moscow’s agents, but his two sons may not have been as lucky.

Both died mysteriously, one in a boating accident and another from being struck by a car in an unsolved hit-and-run. Mr. Augustyn thinks they may have been killed secretly by the Russians or their proxies.

Mr. Augustyn said one of the more interesting cases involved Mr. Zaporozhsky, the KGB colonel who worked in Africa until he was brought to the United States. The defector became convinced by Russian agents in 2001 he would be safe if he went back to Moscow for a reunion and to tell about his activities in a supposedly more lenient post-Soviet Russia.

Senior CIA officials tried to convince him it was not safe, but the warnings were ignored.

The ruse ended when Mr. Zaporozhsky arrived at the airport and was arrested and sentenced to 18 years for spying for the United States.

The defector’s information played a major role in helping U.S. investigators identify CIA turncoat Aldrich Ames, who gave Moscow the names of most of the CIA’s recruited agents in Russia, many of whom were executed.

“He didn’t give the name of Ames because he didn’t know it,” Mr. Augustyn said. “But he gave them enough tips to kind of push it over the edge to identify Ames.”

Mr. Zaporozhsky would be released as part of the spy swap for the 10 KGB illegals, exchanged for four Russians in 2010.

By then, Mr. Zaporozhsky was emaciated from prison and a broken man from the 10-year prison labor experience. He is living in Maryland.

He was lured back and the Russians do that,” he said.

The case highlights a general characteristic of defectors: Many are egotistical and risk-takers.

“Defectors are not normal people, and they think they know better than you do,” Mr. Augustyn said. “And that’s what happened with Zaporozhsky.”

Another defector who is part of the CIA program was Yuri Nosenko, who became part of agency lore during the 1970s when he was suspected by the late CIA counterspy chief James Angleton of being a false defector sent to mislead the U.S. government.

Nosenko defected in 1964 and told American interrogators that Kennedy assassin Lee Harvey Oswald was never recruited by the KGB.

Nosenko came under suspicion based on testimony from another Russian defector, Anatoli Golytsyn, who warned the CIA that Moscow planned to send fake intelligence defectors to spread strategic disinformation.

Growing mystery of suspected energy attacks draws US concern

Growing mystery of suspected energy attacks draws US concern

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FILE – In this Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, tourists ride classic convertible cars on the Malecon beside the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba. The Biden administration faces increasing pressure to respond to a sharply growing number of reported … more >

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By Nomaan Merchant and Robert Burns and Eric Tucker

Associated Press

Sunday, May 23, 2021

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration is facing new pressure to resolve a mystery that has vexed its predecessors: Is an adversary using a microwave or radio wave weapon to attack the brains of U.S. diplomats, spies and military personnel?

The number of reported cases of possible attack is sharply growing and lawmakers from both parties, as well as those believed to be affected, are demanding answers. But scientists and government officials aren’t yet certain about who might have been behind any attacks, if the symptoms could have been caused inadvertently by surveillance equipment — or if the incidents were actually attacks.

Whatever an official review concludes could have enormous consequences. Confirmation that a U.S. adversary has been conducting damaging attacks against U.S. personnel would unleash calls for a forceful response by the United States.

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For now, the administration is providing assurances that it takes the matter seriously, is investigating aggressively and will make sure those affected have good medical care.

The problem has been labeled the “Havana Syndrome,” because the first cases affected personnel in 2016 at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba. At least 130 cases across the government are now under investigation, up from several dozen last year, according to a U.S. defense official who was not authorized to discuss details publicly. The National Security Council is leading the investigation.

People who are believed to have been affected have reported headaches, dizziness and symptoms consistent with concussions, with some requiring months of medical treatment. Some have reported hearing a loud noise before the sudden onset of symptoms.

Particularly alarming are revelations of at least two possible incidents in the Washington area, including one case near the White House in November in which an official reported dizziness.

The new higher number of possible cases was first reported by The New York Times. CNN first reported the case near the White House and an additional incident in November.

Advocates for those affected accuse the U.S. government of long failing to take the problem seriously or provide the necessary medical care and benefits.

“The government has a much better understanding of it than it has let on,” said Mark Zaid, a Washington lawyer who represents several people affected. Zaid has obtained National Security Agency documents noting it has information dating to the late 1990s about an unidentified “hostile country” possibly having a microwave weapon “to weaken, intimidate, or kill an enemy over time.”

Chris Miller, the acting defense secretary during the last months of the Trump administration, created a Pentagon team to investigate the suspected attacks. That was after he met a soldier late last year who described how, while serving in a country Miller wouldn’t identify, he had heard a “shrieking” sound and then had a splitting headache.

“He was well-trained, extremely well-trained, and he’d been in combat before,” Miller told The Associated Press. “This is an American, a member of the Department of Defense. At that point, you can’t ignore that.”

Defense and intelligence officials have publicly promised to push for answers and better care for people with symptoms. Lt. Col. Thomas Campbell, a Defense Department spokesman, said the causes of any incidents “are areas of active inquiry.” Officials have not identified a suspected country, though some people affected suspect Russian involvement.

CIA Director William Burns testified before Congress that he would make the investigation “a very high priority to ensure that my colleagues get the care that they deserve and that we get to the bottom of what caused these incidents and who was responsible.”

Burns receives daily updates on the investigation, which covers employees who have reported cases this year. He has met with those reporting injuries as have other top CIA officials. The agency has worked to reduce the wait time for its employees to receive outpatient treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

The CIA also replaced its chief medical officer with a doctor seen internally as more sympathetic to possible cases.

“We were treated so awfully in the past,” said Marc Polymeropoulos, a 26-year CIA veteran who was diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury following a 2017 visit to Russia. “Now they’re putting people in place who not only believe us but are going to advocate for our health care.”

One key analysis identified “directed, pulsed radio frequency energy” as the most plausible culprit. Published in December by the National Academy of Sciences, the report said a radio frequency attack could alter brain function without causing “gross structural damage.” But the panel could not make a definitive finding on how U.S. personnel may have been hit.

And a declassified 2018 State Department report cited “a lack of senior leadership, ineffective communications, and systemic disorganization” in responding to the Havana cases. The report says the cause of the injuries was “currently unknown.” The document was published by George Washington University’s National Security Archive.

The report also noted that the CIA ultimately closed its Havana station, a victory for a potential adversary.

Dr. James Giordano, a neurology professor at Georgetown University, consulted with the State Department on the Havana cases and has been briefed on more recent incidents in the U.S. and abroad. In reviewing records of people affected in Havana, Giordano noted evidence of neurological injuries in several people, suggesting they may have been hit with radio waves.

He identified two possible culprits: a device intentionally used to target potential victims or a tool that used directed energy waves to conduct surveillance that may have unintentionally harmed the people targeted. One of the November attacks outside the White House had “substantial similarities” to the Havana cases, Giordano said, adding that he was not authorized by the government to be more specific.

“It’s very difficult, if not impossible, to fake or misrepresent certain findings to objective clinical evaluations,” Giordano said. “I mean, there are certain things you can’t make your nerves do or not do.”

Other scientists remain skeptical. Dr. Robert Baloh of the University of California, Los Angeles, argued that scans of healthy people’s brains sometimes display mini-strokes and that any possible weapon would be too large or require too much power to be deployed without detection.

Baloh said the growing number of cases considered directed energy attacks is actually linked to “mass psychogenic illness,” in which people learning of others with symptoms begin to feel sick themselves.

“Many people are hearing about it and that’s how it gets propagated,” Baloh said.

Lawmakers from both parties are pushing the Biden administration to take this seriously. A bill introduced in both the House and Senate on Wednesday would bolster the payment of disability benefits for traumatic brain injuries suffered in the incidents.

“There’s no greater priority than ensuring the health and safety of our people, and the anomalous health incidents that have afflicted our personnel around the world are of grave concern,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, the California Democrat who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, in a statement. Rep. Devin Nunes, the committee’s top Republican, said the people reporting symptoms “were apparently subject to attack.”

Polymeropoulos, the former CIA officer, said he believed the U.S. would ultimately identify what was behind the incidents and who is responsible.

“The actual intelligence is going to take us to the truth on this,” he said. “If we find that a certain adversary did this, there’s going to be uncomfortable decisions on what to do.”

Supreme Court to hear case involving disclosure of alleged CIA detention sites

Supreme Court to hear case involving disclosure of alleged CIA detention sites

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This undated file photo provided by U.S. Central Command, shows Abu Zubaydah, date and location unknown. A federal appeals court hearing the case of a Guantanamo Bay inmate who was subjected to brutal treatment by the CIA after being detained … more >

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By

The Washington Times

Monday, April 26, 2021

The Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear a case that could reveal new details about CIA detention facilities in foreign countries.

Last year, the Trump administration urged the Supreme Court to review a 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals decision that rejected the government’s request to keep secret certain details of the CIA’s activity, including the location of former CIA detention facilities. On Monday, the justices agreed to hear that case.

At issue is information that former al Qaeda operative Abu Zubaydah wants to obtain but which the U.S. government says is classified. Zubaydah was captured after the 9/11 terrorist attacks and is detained in Guantanamo Bay.

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Zubaydah claims he was unlawfully detained in Poland between 2002 and 2003 and his attorneys told the Supreme Court in February 2021 that he is seeking “non-privileged information that could aid Polish prosecutors.”

The Biden administration told the Supreme Court in March 2021 that the information Zubaydah wants is classified and “would be used exclusively in a foreign proceeding considering wholly foreign legal obligations outside the supervisory power of the federal judiciary, and where the very purpose of that proceeding is to investigate alleged clandestine activities of the CIA abroad.”

Zubaydah was captured in 2002 and the Biden administration has described him as a “terrorist facilitator” who ran a terrorist training camp and was connected to Osama bin Laden.

No date has yet been set for arguments in Zubaydah‘s case.

Maduro lodges new allegation of US spying on Venezuela firm

Maduro lodges new allegation of US spying on Venezuela firm

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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro points to supporters during an event marking Youth Day at Miraflores presidential palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Friday, Feb. 12, 2021, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The annual holiday commemorates young people who accompanied heroes in the battle … more >

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By SCOTT SMITH

Associated Press

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

CARACAS, Venezuerla (AP) – Venezuela’s president said Wednesday he is open to dialogue with the new U.S. administration on calming tensions between the two governments and easing his nation’s economic crisis, even while doubling down with fresh accusations that six American oil executives jailed in Caracas spied for the CIA, a claim rejected by relatives and a defense lawyer in the case.

Nicolás Maduro, who spoke at a news conference with international reporters at the Miraflores presidential palace, refused to say whether he has had any direct contacts with the Biden administration, which took office nearly a month ago.

Maduro repeated a phrase he commonly uses, saying he is ready for a dialogue with the U.S. at any moment. The two nations broke ties two years ago when the Trump administration and dozens of other governments backed Maduro‘s leading adversary, Juan Guaidó, arguing that Maduro’s presidency was illegitimate because his reelection was fraudulent.

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The Trump administration heavily sanctioned Maduro and the Venezuelan oil sector as well as brought an indictment levying narcotrafficking charges against Maduro that carry a $15 million reward for his arrest.

Maduro is leading a campaign to resurrect his once-wealthy oil nation’s decimated economy after more than two decades of socialist rule. Maduro seeks relief from sanctions, blaming them for Venezuela‘s problems.

“Is there room for dialogue?” Maduro said in response to a question from The Associated Press on whether he has started conversation with of U.S. President Joe Biden’s administration. “There’s always room for dialogue.”

But the new accusations of spying against Citgo, a U.S.-based subsidiary of Venezuela‘s state oil company, will likely complicate efforts to win sympathy in Washington, where officials in Biden’s State Department have already branded him a “dictator” who should not be engaged with in direct talks.

While Venezuela‘s economic and political crisis deepened, the six Citgo executives were lured back to Caracas from the firm’s headquarters in Houston and jailed on financial charges. Their trial ended in November, with a judge finding them all guilty and sentencing them to prison.

Maduro‘s allegation of spying came in response to a question from AP on whether he could consider releasing U.S. citizens jailed in the U.S., including the so-called Citgo 6, as a goodwill gesture to the new U.S. administration.

He said that while diplomatic efforts are always available, he wouldn’t get involved with criminal cases that had been tried in a Venezuelan court.

“I’m not a judge or prosecutor, and I shouldn’t get involved in this subject,” Maduro said, but he then accused the CIA of infiltrating Citgo. “They started to work as agents of the Central Intelligence Agency. … This is the truth.”

Maduro did not offer proof of his claim, which drew immediate pushback from Venezuelan attorney Jesus Loreto, who represented one of the six Citgo executives.

Loreto told AP that Venezuelan state officials presented no allegations of spying at trial of the six men.

“They were never tried for any spying related offenses. They were not convicted on any charge in any way related to spying,” Loreto said. “That’s the very first time I heard about spying, regarding my client.”

The U.S-based family of Tomeu Vadell, one of the six jailed men, also rejected Maduro’s claims that he spied on his native Venezuela.

The family urged U.S. leaders to do all they can to help bring an end to Vadell’s imprisonment so he can return home to them.

“We ask the Biden administration to expedite the release of our loved one, Tomeu, and other Americans unjustly held in Venezuela,” said one of Vadell’s daughters, Veronica Vadell Weggeman.

___

Scott Smith on Twitter: @ScottSmithAP

The Latest: Trump, US agency allow formal Biden transition

The Latest: Trump, US agency allow formal Biden transition

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President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris attend a meeting at The Queen theater Monday, Nov. 23, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) more >

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By

Associated Press

Monday, November 23, 2020

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Latest on President-elect Joe Biden (all times local):

8 p.m.

The General Services Administration has formally designated President-elect Joe Biden as the “apparent winner” of the Nov. 3 election.

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The move late Monday allows Biden to coordinate with federal agencies on plans for taking over on Jan. 20. Trump, who had refused to concede the election, said in a tweet that he is directing his team to cooperate on the formal transition but is vowing to keep up the fight.

The letter to Biden from Emily Murphy, the head of GSA, came after Trump efforts to subvert the vote failed across battleground states. Michigan certified Biden’s victory Monday, and a federal judge in Pennsylvania tossed a Trump campaign lawsuit on Saturday seeking to prevent certification in that state.

Yohannes Abraham, the executive director of the Biden transition, said in a statement that the decision “is a needed step to begin tackling the challenges facing our nation, including getting the pandemic under control and our economy back on track.”

___

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PRESIDENT-ELECT JOE BIDEN‘S TRANSITION TO THE WHITE HOUSE:

President-elect Joe Biden is building out his administration with several key picks for national security and foreign policy roles, including John Kerry. Biden is expected to nominate Antony Blinken as secretary of state.

Read more:

– AP source: Biden taps ex-Fed chair Yellen to lead treasury

– Carl Bernstein says 21 GOP senators contemptuous of Trump

– Trump aims to box in Biden abroad, but it may not work

– States certifying results ahead of Electoral College meeting

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS GOING ON:

3:55 p.m.

More than 100 former national security officials who served in Republican administrations or GOP members of Congress say President Donald Trump’s refusal to concede the election and allow for an orderly transition is a “serious threat” to the homeland and America’s democratic process.

In a signed letter released Monday, the group urged all Republican leaders, including those on Capitol Hill, to publicly demand that Trump “cease his anti-democratic assault on the integrity of the presidential election.”

Trump has refrained from conceding and has faced roadblocks in courts as he has worked to overturn President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. Trump’s allegations of widespread conspiracy and fraud have been met with rejection as states move forward with certifying their results.

Among those who signed the letter were: former FBI and CIA director William Webster; former CIA Director Michael Hayden; former National Intelligence Director John Negroponte; and Tom Ridge, the former governor of Pennsylvania who was President George W. Bush’s secretary of homeland security.

___

3:30 p.m.

President-elect Joe Biden says he wants to work closely with the nation’s mayors to help Americans cope during the coronavirus pandemic.

Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris met Monday with the U.S. conference of mayors virtually, from a theater in downtown Wilmington, Delaware. They each sat at a low table and spoke to a screen displaying a video grid of 49 mayors.

Biden told the mayors that “the quality of life falls on your shoulders” and said that working with them and getting input from local officials will be “a priority for me as president.” He added that “we’re here for you, and we’re gonna listen to you, and we’re gonna work with you,” regardless of party.

Harris told the mayors that Americans “look to you for confidence, look to you for a sense of security that everything’s going to be okay” and said that they’re “carrying an enormous burden of responsibility” during the pandemic. She added that she looked forward to being a “strong partner” like Biden was when he was vice president.

___

2:35 p.m.

President-elect Joe Biden has selected Avril Haines, a former deputy director of the CIA, to be director of national intelligence, the first woman to hold that post.

If confirmed, Haines would be the first woman to be the nation’s top intelligence officer, charged with overseeing more than a dozen U.S. intelligence agencies.

Picking Haines is a signal that Biden intends to return the nation’s spy agencies to the hands of experienced intelligence professionals. Trump said he was a fan of the agencies, but often disparaged their work, especially their assessment about Russian interference in the 2016 election. He put the word “intelligence” in quotes on several tweets and pushed out more than a handful of individuals who made careers in intelligence in favor of partisan loyalists.

Haines, 51, was the White House deputy national security adviser during the Obama administration. She previously was the deputy director of the CIA and was deputy counsel to the president for national security affairs in the White House counsel’s office.

___

12:20 p.m.

Joe Biden is filling out his administration with key picks for his national security and foreign policy teams.

John Kerry will lead the incoming administration’s effort to combat climate change.

Alejandro Mayorkas will be nominated as the secretary for the department of homeland security.

Biden also plans to nominate Antony Blinken as his secretary of state.

Kerry is a former secretary of state, senator from Massachusetts and Democratic presidential nominee.

Earlier Monday, Biden named two longtime Capitol Hill aides to his legislative affairs team. Reema Dodin and Shuwanza Goff will serve as deputy directors of the White House Office of Legislative Affairs.

___

11:35 a.m.

President-elect Joe Biden has named two longtime Capitol Hill aides to his legislative affairs team.

Reema Dodin and Shuwanza Goff will serve as deputy directors of the White House Office of Legislative Affairs.

Dodin has been working on the transition team already, leading its legislative engagement with lawmakers on Capitol Hill. She also serves as deputy chief of staff and floor director to Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, the Democratic whip in the Senate.

Goff served as floor director for House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer. She helped craft the House Democrats’ legislative agenda.

Dodin and Goff join Louisa Terrell, who was recently named the director of the White House Office of Legislative Affairs. About a dozen other senior White House staffers also have been announced by the president-elect.

The team will be tasked with turning Biden’s long list of campaign promises into legislative blueprints and ushering them through a closely divided House and Senate. The first and biggest concern is expected to be a major coronavirus aid and response package after Biden takes office in January.

John Brennan rips John Ratcliffe for declassifying Clinton, Russia notes

Brennan blasts DNI Ratcliffe for declassifying Clinton, Russia notes

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In this May 23, 2017, file photo, former CIA Director John Brennan testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the House Intelligence Committee Russia Investigation Task Force. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File) more >

Print

By Andrew Blake

The Washington Times

Wednesday, October 7, 2020

John O. Brennan, the former director of the CIA, accused President Trump’s director of national intelligence on Wednesday of selectively declassifying information to advance political interests.

“Just the way Donald Trump has abused the responsibilities and authorities of the office of the presidency, John Ratcliffe has followed in his footsteps and has totally abused those responsibilities and authorities of the Office of Director of National Intelligence,” Mr. Brennan said on MSNBC.

Mr. Brennan, who led the CIA under former President Barack Obama, was reacting to the ODNI releasing some his handwritten notes from during the 2016 election.

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The largely redacted notes, released Tuesday, relate to a July 2016 briefing in which Mr. Brennan told Mr. Obama about Russia and its interest in the race between Mr. Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Mr. Brennan said he told Mr. Obama that the CIA gleaned intelligence suggesting that Russians thought Mrs. Clinton may have approved a plan to stir up a scandal by connecting Mr. Trump to Russia.

But he said Mr. Ratcliffe, a former Republican congressman, revealed details about the briefing in a way that falsely gives the impression that Mrs. Clinton might have done something illegal.

“He has very selectively declassified and released information to try to promote the interests of Donald Trump,” said Mr. Brennan.

Mr. Brennan, a longtime CIA official who retired when Mr. Trump entered office, said he was trying to show Mr. Obama the agency’s ability to collect and access Russian intelligence.

He also stressed claims about Mrs. Clinton wanting to possible start a scandal involving Mr. Trump and Russia were unverified allegations that would not be unlawful or illegal even if true.

“It is incontrovertible that the Russians interfered in the 2016 election on behalf of Donald Trump. It is my view that their assistance really helped get Donald Trump over the finish line in terms of the electoral victory,” said Mr. Brennan.

“And so therefore what John Ratcliffe is doing is really a great disservice,” he continued. “Not just to the women and men of the intelligence community who work around the globe 24 hours a day, seven days a week to keep this country safe. It’s a disservice to the American people, and he should be ashamed, and it’s a disgrace, and I can’t understand how he is allowed to continue in that position.”

The ODNI did not immediately respond to a message seeking its reaction.

Mike Pompeo China speech defends Trump hawkish position

Mike Pompeo defends Trump’s hawkish line against China

Secretary of State set to give major policy speech

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the National Constitution Center about the Commission on Unalienable Rights, Thursday, July 16, 2020, in Philadelphia. (Brendan Smialowski/Pool via AP) more >

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By Bill Gertz

The Washington Times

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo this week will deliver a major speech on the shortcomings of American foreign policy toward China, arguing that the record clearly supports President Trump’s new and tougher approach to Beijing.

The policy speech, set for Thursday at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum near Los Angeles, will be the fourth in a series of addresses by the most senior national security officials of the Trump administration. Taken together, the speeches mark the most systematic and comprehensive response by a U.S. administration to address the challenges posed by China’s rise as a global economic and military power.

“We put together a series of remarks aimed at making sure the American people understood the ongoing, serious threat posed by the Chinese Communist Party to our fundamental way of life here in the United States of America,” Mr. Pompeo told The Washington Times in an interview.

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The speech will explain that the basis for U.S.-China relations since the 1970s —unfettered engagement and large-scale business ties with China — is obsolete. Mr. Pompeo will explain that the administration is fashioning new U.S. policies based on a relationship more in line with American values and principles.

The secretary of state also is expected to meet with a group of Chinese dissidents and pro-democracy advocates during his one-day visit to California.

In the interview, Mr. Pompeo said he plans to explain in detail how Mr. Trump has recognized the threat from China and the decades of harm it has caused to U.S. and other Western economies.

In response, the administration has begun to take “true concrete responses that can begin to reshape the relationship in a way that is fundamentally more fair and reciprocal for the American people, middle-class workers in America,” he said.

Past engagement policies, he said, failed to produce a moderate, pro-Western China. Mr. Trump is pursuing polices aimed at making sure China treats Americans “in a way that’s consistent with how we ask every country to behave,” Mr. Pompeo said.

The Pompeo speech will be the culmination of a series of high-level efforts to highlight the threat posed by China. White House National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien, FBI Director Christopher A. Wray and Attorney General William P. Barr also have weighed in on various aspects of U.S.-Chinese policy, each time drawing a sharp rebuke from Beijing.

Taking on the deep state

In the wide-ranging interview, Mr. Pompeo discussed the problem of bureaucratic resistance in the State Department and in the CIA, which he used to run, to Mr. Trump’s “America First” agenda. He said the administration is well-positioned to protect the security of the upcoming presidential election from foreign threats.

Mr. Pompeo also warned China not to arm Iran with advanced weapons when the arms embargo on Tehran ends in October. Beijing and Tehran are reportedly discussing a major economic and security pact in defiance of U.S. sanctions on Iran.

On the “deep state” opposition within the U.S. government, Mr. Pompeo said he has dealt with the resistance at the State Department, with its 75,000 employees, and during his role as CIA director.

“As for my experience now, 3½ years in, having first run the CIA and now as America’s chief diplomat, these are indeed big bureaucracies,” Mr. Pompeo said. “There are big bureaucracies in the private sector too, but inside government it takes a special capacity to get them all moving in the right direction.”

Policy opposition comes from “those who sit inside these bureaucracies and have policy differences.”

“I’m fine with people having different judgments, different views,” he said. “Even the senior leadership team at the State Department has different views. Air and vet them, make the case, build data sets around your argument, present them in a way that is rational and convincing.”

Disagreements also arise at the Cabinet level, but they are sorted out.

“When we’re done with [debate] and all that’s been sorted through, and the president has given guidance and I’ve issued implementation directions, the entire team has to work together to do that,” he said.

“There have been those who have decided they didn’t want be part of that,” he said. “So be it. They should leave. But everyone who remains, everybody who’s got their oar in the water still trying to pull America in the right direction has the true responsibility to execute in a way that’s consistent with President Trump’s foreign policy objective. And my mission is to make sure this organization, the State Department, and the CIA before that, did precisely that.”

Mr. Trump in May fired State Department Inspector General Steve Linick. Mr. Pompeo said Mr. Linick was dismissed for “undermining” the State Department. He did not elaborate. Congressional Democrats have said Mr. Linick was dismissed for investigating policy and personal matters related directly to Mr. Pompeo.

Ties with Iran

On Iran, recent news reports said Beijing is in the final stages of concluding an economic and military deal with Iran worth $400 billion for infrastructure, and closer defense and intelligence cooperation. China, which supports the 2015 Iran nuclear deal that the Trump administration repudiated in 2018, in the past has provided missiles and other military hardware to Iran despite nuclear sanctions.

“We’re watching the reporting … about the relationship between Iran and China,” Mr. Pompeo said. “We will hold every nation accountable that violates U.S. sanctions.

“I hope that the Chinese Communist Party sees that it is not in their best interest to support and provide weapons systems to the world’s largest state sponsor of terror.”

Mr. Pompeo said he hopes Beijing will support U.S. efforts at the United Nations to block the lifting of the arms embargo on Iran. China, Russia and even some European allies have sent strong signals that they will oppose Washington’s efforts to preserve the embargo, a provision of the 2015 nuclear deal.

“It should not be the case that the world is going to stand by and allow an Iranian regime that continues to sponsor terror all around the world to allow them to be an arms merchant, allow them to purchase air defense systems and other capabilities that will protect them so that they are more capable of delivering nuclear weapons,” Mr. Pompeo said. “We’re not going to allow that to happen. I hope that the Chinese Communist Party will join alongside of us.”

Mr. Pompeo said the Trump administration is seeking to overhaul and improve U.S. radio broadcasting and information programs now that the first chief executive, Michael Pack, is now in place at the U.S. Agency for Global Media.

Mr. Pack dismissed all the directors of several government-funded radios, and the director of the flagship Voice of America, Amanda Bennett, stepped down before she could be fired. Mr. Trump has criticized VOA broadcasts, leading some critics to accuse the administration of threatening the service’s journalistic independence.

The message to be beamed abroad will be that “America is a force for good and that the threats that emanate from regimes like the Chinese Communist Party need not be tolerated and that America will be there to support those freedom-loving nations,” Mr. Pompeo said.

China and its neighbors

On recent tensions between Taiwan and mainland China, Mr. Pompeo said Mr. Trump is following the path forged by President Reagan in supporting Taipei’s defenses.

For the first time in decades, the administration agreed to sell new F-16 jets to Taiwan and has supplied other important weaponry in a bid to bolster the island’s defenses against China’s growing encroachment in waters along its periphery, Mr. Pompeo said.

Mr. Pompeo also said that what he called China’s failure to abide by its commitments in Hong Kong — Beijing recently approved a tough security law for the enclave that critics say violates a 1997 handover agreement to respect self-rule and autonomy in the former British colony — is raising worries about China’s threats to use force against Taiwan.

China has “a series of commitments they’ve made to the people who live in Taiwan and to the world, the fact that they will not use military force,” Mr. Pompeo said. “We set out in every conversation we have with our Chinese counterparts our expectation that they will live up to those commitments.”

China’s neighbors in the region, he added, increasingly appreciate the American security commitments in the face of Beijing’s aggressiveness.

Mr. Pompeo said the Trump administration is actively supporting Hong Kong activists in their challenge to Chinese rule. Asked whether the curbs on freedom can be rolled back and democracy restored, Mr. Pompeo said, “The people of Hong Kong are going to demand it.”

An election is set for September, and Hong Kong voters will have a chance to “raise their voices” against Beijing in “demanding the freedom that the Communist Party promised them.”

China ignored the appeals. As a result, the administration has rescinded Hong Kong’s special economic status, Mr. Pompeo said.

On Chinese expansive maritime claims to own most of the South China Sea, Mr. Pompeo said the U.S. conducted a careful legal review before the State Department declared last week that those claims are illegal under international law.

“The Obama-Biden administration turned the other cheek when China violated basic promises” on not building military bases on disputed islands in the sea, he said. Chinese President Xi Jinping told President Obama in 2015 that China had no plans to deploy military forces on disputed islands.

Mr. Xi “then did, and the previous administration did nothing,” Mr. Pompeo said.

Beginning in April 2018, the Pentagon detected the deployment of Chinese anti-ship and anti-aircraft missiles on several South China Sea islands. Mr. Pompeo said the U.S. is preparing a series of actions in response to Chinese militarization in the sea.

The Trump administration has begun providing assistance to nations China has challenged in the South China Sea. After last week’s statement from Washington, Mr. Pompeo said, China seems to have backed off the legal claim and is now negotiating agreements with individual states in the region in a bid to “pick them off one by one.”

“We’re going to do everything we can to make sure that [the Chinese] are not successful at that,” he said. “We cannot let China claim all of that sea as their maritime empire. This is a free and open Indo-Pacific region.”

Cables: US falsely said British queen backed 1953 Iran coup

Cables: US falsely said British queen backed 1953 Iran coup

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FILE – In this Sept. 27, 1951 file photo, Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh rides on the shoulders of cheering crowds in Tehran’s Majlis Square, outside the parliament building, after reiterating his oil nationalization views to his supporters. The U.S. ambassador … more >

Print

By JON GAMBRELL

Associated Press

Friday, June 12, 2020

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) – The U.S. ambassador to Iran mistakenly told the shah in 1953 that Britain’s newly enthroned Queen Elizabeth II backed a plan to overthrow the country’s elected prime minister and America maintained the fiction even after realizing the error, historians now say.

The revelation, based on U.S. diplomatic cables cited by the historians, shows how America has struggled even to this day to offer a full, unvarnished account of its actions in the coup that cemented Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi’s power and lit the fuse for Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution.

“There’s an acceptance that you’re never going to have the whole story,” said Richard Aldrich, a professor at the University of Warwick whose research on the cables will be featured in a Channel 4 documentary in Britain on Sunday. “You’re on a journey to try and achieve a better history but you’re never going to have the complete story.”

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The 1953 coup ended up successfully empowering the shah, even after he fled to Baghdad and onto Italy when it looked as though it would fail. He would rule until 1979, when he fled the country before the Islamic Revolution, secretly and fatally ill with cancer.

The coup had roots in the nationalization of Iran’s oil industry, which at that time was majority owned by Britain. Mohammad Mosaddegh, who supported nationalization, then became Iran’s prime minister. Britain launched a blockade on the country and ultimately saw its Tehran embassy ordered closed.

The British, who had begun drawing up plans for a possible coup, then turned to the U.S. under President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Eisenhower, fearful of the spread of communism amid the growing Cold War with the Soviet Union, gave the go-ahead for TPAJAX – the CIA codename for the coup plot.

Papers show the CIA at one point “stockpiled enough arms and demolition material to support a 10,000-man guerrilla organization for six months,” and paid out $5.3 million for bribes and other costs, which would be equivalent to $48 million today. One CIA document casually refers to the fact that “several leading members of these (Iranian) security services are paid agents of this organization.”

But the coup faced problems, chief among them the shah himself. Diplomats and spies referred to him as a “weak reed” and “petulant.” The CIA dismissively referred to him as “Boy Scout,” Aldrich said.

The shah grew fearful of Mosaddegh’s growing power and prepared to flee Iran in February 1953, months before the coup. U.S. Ambassador Loy W. Henderson rushed to the palace to try to see him. Instead, he got to Hosein Ala, the shah’s minister of court, who called the shah on a palace telephone line.

Despite fears the telephone may be tapped, Henderson spoke through Ala to the shah, as the Channel 4 documentary “The Queen and the Coup” and a later diplomatic cable by Henderson recounted.

“I had just received message indicating that very important personage for whom shah had most friendly feelings had also expressed sincere hope that shah could be dissuaded from leaving country,” Henderson wrote.

That cable, part of others released by the U.S. State Department’s historian in 2017, included a footnote mentioning another cable from the U.S. Embassy in London.

“Foreign Office this afternoon informed us of receipt message from (Foreign Minister Anthony) Eden from Queen Elizabeth expressing concern at latest developments re shah and strong hope we can find some means of dissuading him from leaving country,” the footnote reads.

That suggests Queen Elizabeth herself had sent a message. Instead, Eden at the time was aboard the vessel RMS Queen Elizabeth on his way to Canada, which is what American diplomats in London had meant to say.

The U.S. Embassy in London realized its mistake and fired off another cable that warned “Queen Elizabeth refers, of course to vessel and not … to monarch.” But Henderson at that point already had spoken to the shah.

Realizing the mistake, the U.S. Embassy in London wrote back that it “does not (repeat not) propose to inform British of incident.” But that intervention likely ended up helping goad the shah into staying in Iran for several more months – until the CIA launched the coup.

“In terms of the kind of chain of events, it’s important because, you know, frankly, the shah is a coward,” Aldrich told The Associated Press. “I don’t think the 1953 coup would have happened if the shah had fled then. At this point, there’s no doubt that he’s packed his bags and was pretty much going to the airport when this intervention happened.”

But those two cables acknowledging the error, which the historians found at the National Archives in Washington, don’t appear in the 2017 release by the State Department, which itself was meant to offer a fuller, warts-and-all accounting of American actions.

An initial 1989 release outlining the years surrounding the 1953 coup in Iran whitewashed the U.S. role in the coup. That led to the resignation of the historian in charge of a State Department review board and to Congress passing a law requiring that a more reliable historical account be made.

The State Department did not respond to an AP request for comment. However, over 65 years later, historians still struggle to extract documents from the CIA and other government agencies surrounding the coup.

These new cables suggest more remains to be discovered, said Malcolm Byrne, who studies Iran at the non-governmental National Security Archive at George Washington University.

“We’ve known that all along,” Byrne said.

Widespread Iranian anger over the Western coup fed into the revolution and its aftermath, which saw Iranian students seize control of the U.S. Embassy and hold those inside captive for 444 days.

To this day Iran’s Shiite theocracy portrays the U.S. as a hostile foreign power bent on subverting and overthrowing its government. Hard-liners still refer to Britain as “the old fox,” a sly adversary.

The 1953 coup is their first piece of evidence.

___

Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jongambrellAP.

Mihaela Marinova – Hips Don’t Lie (Като Две Капки Вода) (Shakira COver)

Ladies up in here tonight
No fighting
We got the refugees up in here (no fighting)
No fighting

Shakira, Shakira

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man wants to speak Spanish
Como se llama (si)
Bonita (si)
Mi casa (Shakira Shakira), su casa

Oh baby when you talk like that
You make a woman go mad
So be wise (si) and keep on (si)
Reading the signs of my body (uno, dos, tres, cuatro)

And I’m on tonight you know my hips don’t lie
And I’m starting to feel it’s right
All the attraction, the tension
Don’t you see baby, this is perfection

Hey Girl, I can see your body moving
And it’s driving me crazy
And I didn’t have the slightest idea
Until I saw you dancing

And when you walk up on the dance floor
Nobody cannot ignore
The way you move your body, girl (just move)
And everything so unexpected, the way you right and left it
So you can keep on shaking it

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man wants to speak Spanish
Como se llama (si)
Bonita (si)
Mi casa (Shakira Shakira), su casa

Oh baby when you talk like that
You make a woman go mad
So be wise (si) and keep on (si)
Reading the signs of my body (no fighting)

And I’m on tonight you know my hips don’t lie (no fighting)
And I am starting to feel you boy
Come on lets go, real slow
Don’t you see baby asi es perfecto

I know I am on tonight
My hips don’t lie and I am starting to feel it’s right
All the attraction, the tension
Don’t you see baby, this is perfection (Shakira, Shakira)

Oh boy, I can see your body moving
Half animal, half man
I don’t, don’t really know what I’m doing
But you seem to have a plan
My will and self restraint
Have come to fail now, fail now
See, I am doing what I can, but I can’t so you know
That’s a bit too hard to explain

Baila en la calle de noche
Baila en la calle de día

Baila en la calle de noche
Baila en la calle de día

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man wants to speak Spanish
Como se llama (si)
Bonita (si)
Mi casa (Shakira Shakira), su casa

Oh baby when you talk like that
You know you got me hypnotized
So be wise and keep on
Reading the signs of my body

Señorita,
Feel the conga, let me see you move like you come from Colombia

Mira en Barranquilla se baila así, say it!
En Barranquilla se baila así

Yeah, she’s so sexy every man’s fantasy a refugee
Like me back with the Fugees from a 3rd world country
I go back like when Pac carried crates
For Humpty Humpty we need a whole club dizzy
Why the CIA wanna watch us? Colombians and Haitians
I ain’t guilty, it’s a musical transaction
No more do we snatch ropes
Refugees run the seas ’cause we own our own boats (no fighting)

I’m on tonight
My hips don’t lie and I am starting to feel you boy
Come on lets go, real slow
Baby like this is perfecto (no fighting)

Oh, you know I am on tonight
My hips don’t lie and I am starting to feel it’s right
The attraction
The tension
Baby, like this is perfection

No fighting
No fighting

Shakira – Hips Don’t Lie (feat. Wyclef Jean)

Ladies up in here tonight
No fighting, no fighting
We got the refugees up in here
No fighting, no fighting

Shakira, Shakira

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man wants to speak Spanish
Como te llama,[si],bonita[si], que pasa?
Shakira, Shakira

Oh baby when you talk like that
You make a woman go mad
So be wise and keep on
Reading the signs of my body

And I’m on tonight
You know my hips don’t lie
And I’m starting to feel it’s right
All the attraction, the tension
Don’t you see baby, si, es perfecto

Hey Girl, I can see your body moving
And it’s driving me crazy
And I didn’t have the slightest idea
Until I saw you dancing

And when you walk up on the dance floor
Nobody cannot ignore the way you move your body, girl
And everything so unexpected – the way you right and left it
So you can keep on taking it

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man want to speak Spanish
Como te llama[si], bonita[si], que pasa?
Shakira, Shakira

Oh baby when you talk like that
You make a woman go mad
So be wise and keep on
Reading the signs of my body

And I’m on tonight
You know my hips don’t lie
And I am starting to feel you boy
Come on lets go, real slow
Don’t you see baby asi es perfecto

Oh I know I am on tonight my hips don’t lie
And I am starting to feel it’s right
All the attraction, the tension
Don’t you see baby, si, es perfecto
Shakira, Shakira

Oh boy, I can see your body moving
Half animal, half man
I don’t, don’t really know what I’m doing
But you seem to have a plan
My will and self restraint
Have come to fail now, fail now
See, I am doing what I can, but I can’t so you know
That’s a bit too hard to explain

Baila en la calle de noche
Baila en la calle de dia

Baila en la calle de noche
Baila en la calle de dia

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man want to speak Spanish
Como te llama[si], bonita[si], que pasa?
Shakira, Shakira

Oh baby when you talk like that
You know you got me hypnotized
So be wise and keep on
Reading the signs of my body

Senorita, feel the conga, let me see you move
like you come from Colombia

Mira en Barranquilla se baila asi , say it!
Mira en Barranquilla se baila asi
Yeah

She’s so sexy every man’s fantasy a refugee
like me back with the Fugees from a 3rd world country
I go back like when ‘pac carried crates for Humpty Humpty
I need a whole club dizzy
Why the CIA wanna watch us?
Colombians and Haitians
I ain’t guilty, it’s a musical transaction
No more do we snatch ropes
Refugees run the seas ’cause we own our own boats

I’m on tonight, my hips don’t lie
And I’m starting to feel you boy
Come on let’s go, real slow
Baby, like this is perfecto

Oh, you know I am on tonight and my hips don’t lie
And I am starting to feel it’s right
The attraction, the tension
Baby, like this is perfection

No fighting
No fighting

Motley Crue – Anarchy In The U.k.

Right now
Oh I am an anti-Christ
And I am an anarchist
Don’t know what I want
But I know how to get it
I want to destroy your passion boy
‘Cause I, I want to be, anarchy
In this fuckin’ city

Anarchy for the USA
It’s coming sometime, maybe
I give a wrong time stop at traffic line
Your future dream is a sharpie’s scheme
‘Cause I want to be, anarchy
Well it’s the only way to be

Ha ha ha ha ha ha
There are many ways to get what you want
I use the best, well I use the rest
Well I use the enemy
I use anarchy
‘Cause I, I want to be, anarchy
Fuck the rat race man

Is this the PMRC
Or is this the DEA
Or is this the CIA
I thought it was the U.S.A.
Or just another country
Some other fuckin’ country
And I, want to be, anarchy
Oh I want to fuckin’ hear it man
And I, want to be, anarchy
Let’s say it again boys
And I, want to be, anarchy
Fuckin’ destroy

Shakira – Hips Don’t Lie (feat. Wyclef Jean) letras

Ladies up in here tonight
No fighting, no fighting
We got the refugees up in here
No fighting, no fighting

Shakira, Shakira

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man wants to speak Spanish
Como te llama,[si],bonita[si], que pasa?
Shakira, Shakira

Oh baby when you talk like that
You make a woman go mad
So be wise and keep on
Reading the signs of my body

And I’m on tonight
You know my hips don’t lie
And I’m starting to feel it’s right
All the attraction, the tension
Don’t you see baby, si, es perfecto

Hey Girl, I can see your body moving
And it’s driving me crazy
And I didn’t have the slightest idea
Until I saw you dancing

And when you walk up on the dance floor
Nobody cannot ignore the way you move your body, girl
And everything so unexpected – the way you right and left it
So you can keep on taking it

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man want to speak Spanish
Como te llama[si], bonita[si], que pasa?
Shakira, Shakira

Oh baby when you talk like that
You make a woman go mad
So be wise and keep on
Reading the signs of my body

And I’m on tonight
You know my hips don’t lie
And I am starting to feel you boy
Come on lets go, real slow
Don’t you see baby asi es perfecto

Oh I know I am on tonight my hips don’t lie
And I am starting to feel it’s right
All the attraction, the tension
Don’t you see baby, si, es perfecto
Shakira, Shakira

Oh boy, I can see your body moving
Half animal, half man
I don’t, don’t really know what I’m doing
But you seem to have a plan
My will and self restraint
Have come to fail now, fail now
See, I am doing what I can, but I can’t so you know
That’s a bit too hard to explain

Baila en la calle de noche
Baila en la calle de dia

Baila en la calle de noche
Baila en la calle de dia

I never really knew that she could dance like this
She makes a man want to speak Spanish
Como te llama[si], bonita[si], que pasa?
Shakira, Shakira

Oh baby when you talk like that
You know you got me hypnotized
So be wise and keep on
Reading the signs of my body

Senorita, feel the conga, let me see you move
like you come from Colombia

Mira en Barranquilla se baila asi , say it!
Mira en Barranquilla se baila asi
Yeah

She’s so sexy every man’s fantasy a refugee
like me back with the Fugees from a 3rd world country
I go back like when ‘pac carried crates for Humpty Humpty
I need a whole club dizzy
Why the CIA wanna watch us?
Colombians and Haitians
I ain’t guilty, it’s a musical transaction
No more do we snatch ropes
Refugees run the seas ’cause we own our own boats

I’m on tonight, my hips don’t lie
And I’m starting to feel you boy
Come on let’s go, real slow
Baby, like this is perfecto

Oh, you know I am on tonight and my hips don’t lie
And I am starting to feel it’s right
The attraction, the tension
Baby, like this is perfection

No fighting
No fighting

Motley Crue – Anarchy In The U.K. letras

Right now
Oh I am an anti-Christ
And I am an anarchist
Don’t know what I want
But I know how to get it
I want to destroy your passion boy
‘Cause I, I want to be, anarchy
In this fuckin’ city

Anarchy for the USA
It’s coming sometime, maybe
I give a wrong time stop at traffic line
Your future dream is a sharpie’s scheme
‘Cause I want to be, anarchy
Well it’s the only way to be

Ha ha ha ha ha ha
There are many ways to get what you want
I use the best, well I use the rest
Well I use the enemy
I use anarchy
‘Cause I, I want to be, anarchy
Fuck the rat race man

Is this the PMRC
Or is this the DEA
Or is this the CIA
I thought it was the U.S.A.
Or just another country
Some other fuckin’ country
And I, want to be, anarchy
Oh I want to fuckin’ hear it man
And I, want to be, anarchy
Let’s say it again boys
And I, want to be, anarchy
Fuckin’ destroy