Asia Today: Outbreak in northwest China spreads to 2nd city

Outbreak in northwest China spreads to 2nd city

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Eastern Oregon residents eye revolt to join Idaho amid daily protests in Portland

Quiz: Who said these famous quotes in history?

NIH’s ‘Shark Tank’-style competition helps develop rapid coronavirus test

Quiz: Can you pass a European history test?

War footing: Trump takes on Putin, China in international power battle

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Richard W. Rahn

Supporters of Black Lives Matter in denial of real-world consequences

Michael McKenna

Biden presidency would push expensive climate plan

Robert Knight

Smithsonian busted for race hustling

View all

Question of the Day

Should schools re-open in the fall?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Movie-goers wearing masks to protect themselves from the coronavirus are spaced apart as they watch a movie in a newly reopened cinema in Hangzhou in eastern China’s Zhejiang province on Monday, July 20, 2020. China is going back to the … more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Sunday, July 19, 2020

BEIJING (AP) — China’s latest coronavirus outbreak has spread to a second city in the northwestern region of Xinjiang.

One of the 17 new cases reported on Monday was in the ancient Silk Road city of Kashgar, the regional government said on its official microblog. The remainder were in the regional capital of Urumqi, where all other cases have been reported since the outbreak that has now infected at least 47 people emerged earlier this month.

Authorities in Urumqi have tried to prevent the spread by closing off communities and imposing travel restrictions.

TOP STORIES

Black conservative takes on Maxine Waters

Larry Elder's Black conservative film 'Uncle Tom' takes top spot for documentaries

Michael Flynn's attorneys say federal judge has 'hijacked' case; they ask to deny bid for rehearing

Xinjiang is a vast, thinly populated region of mountains and deserts and had seen little impact from the pandemic that emerged from the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year and was largely contained within China in March.

Another five new cases reported Monday by the National Health Commission were imported.

China also said 5,370 people had been arrested for pandemic-related crimes between January and June. More than 40% were charged with fraud, the state prosecutor’s office announced on its official microblog. Another 15% were charged with obstruction of law enforcement, with others accused of producing and selling fake and shoddy goods, creating public disturbances, and transporting and selling endangered species.

China has strengthened protection for wild animals following the emergence of the virus, which may have originated in bats before jumping to humans via an intermediary species such as the anteater-like pangolin.

No specific figures were given for those accused of violating quarantine rules and travel restrictions, although there have been relatively few such cases reported in official media.

Although faulted for allowing the virus to spread from Wuhan, China’s government has been credited with imposing rigid and sometimes draconian measures to contain the outbreak, and people have overwhelmingly complied with orders to wear masks, display certificates of good health and maintain social distancing.

In other developments in the Asia-Pacific region:

– A record surge of 40,425 reported cases of coronavirus in the past 24 hours took India’s total to 1,118,043. The Health Ministry on Monday also reported another 681 deaths, taking total fatalities to 27,497. India has the third most cases and eighth most deaths in the world. A country of 1.4 billion people, India has been conducting nearly 10,000 tests per million population. More than 300,000 samples are being tested daily, according to the Indian Council of Medical Research, India’s top medical research body. With India’s national lockdown largely lifted, local governments have been ordering focused lockdowns on high-risk areas where new outbreaks are surging.

– Australia’s hard-hit Victoria state reported 275 more COVID-19 cases on Monday, a third daily figure that was below last Friday’s peak. Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said the impact of the lockdown on Australia’s second-largest city Melbourne should become apparent Wednesday, which is two weeks after the six-week shutdown began. “It is a wicked enemy, it is unstable and until we bring some stability to this, I don’t think we’ll be able to talk about a trend,” Andrews said. Victoria had conducted more than 1.3 million coronavirus tests among a population of 6.5 million, which represented one of the highest testing rates in the world, he said.

– South Korea has reported its smallest daily jump in local COVID-19 transmissions in two months as health authorities express cautious optimism that the outbreak is being brought under control. South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday still reported 26 newly confirmed cases of the coronavirus, including 22 that were tied to international arrivals. Vice Health Minister Kim Gang-lip said the four local cases were the first below 10 since May 19. He continued to plead for vigilance, encouraging people to avoid crowded places or even stay at home during the summer holiday period.

– Hong Kong reported 73 new coronavirus infections on Monday, 66 of which were locally transmitted, as the city grapples with a new outbreak. Of the locally transmitted infections, 27 were from unknown sources while the remaining 39 were linked to previously known clusters. Among the new patients was a doctor who visited an elderly care home. Hong Kong’s health officials said tighter anti-virus measures may be required if the trend does not come down over the next few days. Hong Kong has reported a total of 1,958 coronavirus infections, with 12 deaths.

Virus rebounds around the world, deaths top 600,000

Virus rebounds around the world, deaths top 600,000

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Rise of Kim Jong-un’s sister marks increase North Korean cyberattacks

Quiz: Can you pass a U.S. Constitution test?

New St. Andrews College president under fire after ‘we know science’ bathroom video

Quiz: Are you smarter than an 8th grader?

Not so Top Gun: Navy’s newest $13 billion supercarrier plagued by mechanical woes

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Biden presidency would push expensive climate plan

Robert Knight

Smithsonian busted for race hustling

Cheryl K. Chumley

Joe Biden is America’s worst-case puppet

View all

Question of the Day

Should schools re-open in the fall?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

A street artist spray paints a protective face mask over an old mural featuring a Venezuelan Indigenous man, in Caracas, Venezuela, Saturday, July 18, 2020, amid the new coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Matias Delacroix) more >

Print

By GEIR MOULSON

Associated Press

Sunday, July 19, 2020

BERLIN (AP) – The coronavirus pandemic has found fresh legs around the world, as confirmed deaths pass 600,000 and countries from the U.S. to South Africa to India struggle to contain a surge of new infections. Hong Kong issued tougher new rules on wearing face masks, Spain closed overcrowded beaches and Germany reported another outbreak at a slaughterhouse.

Pope Francis said “the pandemic is showing no sign of stopping” and urged compassion for those whose suffering during the outbreak has been worsened by conflicts.

The World Health Organization said that 259,848 new infections were reported Saturday, its highest one-day tally yet.

TOP STORIES

Black Lives Matter leader Charles Wade charged with sex trafficking

FBI Crossfire Hurricane unit watched Trump the day he took oath of office

Two-thirds of voters now believe major news organizations have political agenda: Poll

While the U.S. leads global infections, South Africa now ranks as the fifth worst-hit country in the pandemic with more than 350,000 cases, or around half of all those confirmed on the continent. Its struggles are a sign of trouble to come for nations with even fewer health care resources.

India, which has now confirmed more than 1 million infections, on Sunday reported a 24-hour record of 38,902 new cases.

In Europe, where infections are far below their peak but local outbreaks are causing concern, leaders of the 27-nation European Union haggled for a third day in Brussels over a proposed 1.85 trillion-euro ($2.1 trillion) EU budget and coronavirus recovery fund.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said there is “a lot of good will, but there are also a lot of positions” in the talks, which have have laid bare divisions about how the countries hit hardest by the pandemic, such as Italy and Spain, should be helped. She said the talks, which were initially scheduled to end on Saturday, could still end without a deal.

As scientists around the world race to find a vaccine to halt the pandemic, Russia’s ambassador to Britain on Sunday rejected allegations by the United States, Britain and China that his country’s intelligence services have sought to steal information about vaccine efforts.

“I don’t believe in this story at all, there is no sense in it,” Ambassador Andrei Kelin said when asked in a BBC interview about the allegations. “I learned about their (the hackers’) existence from British media. In this world, to attribute any kind of computer hackers to any country, it is impossible.”

Confirmed global virus deaths risen to nearly 603,000, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins. The United States tops the list with over 140,000, followed by more than 78,000 in Brazil. Europe as a continent has seen about 200,000 deaths.

The number of confirmed infections worldwide has passed 14.2 million, with 3.7 million in the United States and more than 2 million in Brazil. Experts believe the pandemic’s true toll around the world is much higher because of testing shortages and data collection issues.

Infections have been soaring in U.S. states such as Florida, Texas, Arizona, with many blaming a haphazard, partisan approach to lifting lockdowns as well as the resistance of some Americans to wearing masks. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Sunday that the situation was so dire in his California city that authorities were considering a new stay-at-home order.

Even where the situation has been largely brought under control, new outbreaks are prompting the return of restrictions.

Following a recent surge in cases, Hong Kong made the wearing of masks mandatory in all public places and told non-essential civil servants to work from home. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said the situation in the Asian financial hub is “really critical” and that she sees “no sign” that it’s under control.

Police in Barcelona have limited access to some of the city’s beloved beaches because sunbathers were ignoring social distancing regulations amid a resurgence of coronavirus infections. Authorities in Amsterdam urged people not to visit the city’s famous red light district and have closed off some of the historic district’s narrow streets because they are too busy.

Slaughterhouses also have featured in outbreaks in the U.S., Germany and elsewhere. Authorities in northwestern Germany’s Vechta county said 66 workers at a chicken slaughterhouse tested positive, though most appeared to have been infected in their free time. An earlier outbreak at a slaughterhouse in western Germany infected over 1,400 and prompted a partial lockdown.

Cases in the Australian state of Victoria rose again Sunday, prompting a move to make masks mandatory in metropolitan Melbourne and the nearby district of Mitchell for people who leave their homes for exercise or to purchase essential goods.

Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews said those who fail to wear a mask will be fined 200 Australian dollars ($140).

“There’s no vaccine to this wildly infectious virus and it’s a simple thing, but it’s about changing habits, it’s about becoming a simple part of your routine,” Andrews said.

Speaking on Sunday from his window overlooking St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis renewed his appeal for an immediate worldwide cease-fire that he said “will permit the peace and security indispensable to supplying the necessary humanitarian assistance.”

___

Moulson contributed from Berlin. Associated Press writers around the world contributed to this report.

___

Follow AP pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Alarm over new virus outbreaks as India cases pass 1 million

Alarm over new virus outbreaks as India cases pass 1 million

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Rise of Kim Jong-un’s sister marks increase North Korean cyberattacks

Quiz: Can you pass a U.S. Constitution test?

New St. Andrews College president under fire after ‘we know science’ bathroom video

Quiz: Are you smarter than an 8th grader?

Not so Top Gun: Navy’s newest $13 billion supercarrier plagued by mechanical woes

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Charles Hurt

Baseball is the answer

Scott Walker

Biden doesn’t understand that tax cuts work

Daniel N. Hoffman

Is Russia paying the Taliban bounties to kill U.S. troops?

View all

Question of the Day

Should schools re-open in the fall?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

A health worker takes a nasal swab of a person for a COVID-19 test at a hospital in New Delhi, India, Monday, July 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup) more >

Print

By Elaine Kurtenbach and Nomaan Merchant

Associated Press

Friday, July 17, 2020

MITO, Japan (AP) — New coronavirus outbreaks, even in places as far flung as China’s western Xinjiang region, are prompting worldwide moves to guard against the pandemic, as the number of confirmed cases globally approaches 14 million.

India on Friday said it had surpassed 1 million cases, third only to the United States and Brazil, with more than 25,000 deaths. That followed Brazil’s announcement Thursday evening that the country had passed 2 million confirmed cases and 76,000 deaths – 1,000 fatalities a day, on average, since late May on a gruesome plateau that has yet to tilt downward.

India’s grim milestone drove home concerns over the country’s readiness to deal with an inevitable surge that could overwhelm hospitals and test the country’s feeble health care system.

TOP STORIES

Terry Crews to Nick Cannon apologists: 'I was never afraid of the KKK. It was people like you'

Chrissy Teigen deletes 60K tweets, blocks 1M; celeb says 'psychopaths' tie her to Ghislaine Maxwell

Iranian dissidents rally for regime change in Tehran

In the technology hub of Bangalore, the government ordered a weeklong lockdown that began Tuesday evening after the cases surged exponentially.

Local governments are frantically trying to quash outbreaks and keep their economies running as the pandemic spreads in the vast countryside.

“The acceleration in cases remains the main challenge for India in the coming days,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, adding that a vast majority of cases were still being missed.

China on Friday reported nine imported cases. Health officials in Xinjiang also reported six confirmed cases of local transmission. They said another 11 people tested positive but were asymptomatic. China does not include asymptomatic cases in its caseload totals.

The Muslim-majority region is so far from Beijing that residents operate by their own, unofficial time zone and had until now been little affected by outbreaks elsewhere that appear to have been brought under control.

Health officials said all the cases emerged from among people who had earlier been placed under isolation and close monitoring in the regional capital, Urumqi. Another 135 people were being monitored in isolation.

The city of 3.5 million tightened anti-virus measures following the emergence of the new cases. It shut down a main subway line and closed off some residential compounds, ordering passengers boarding flights to show a test result and mobile phone health certificate to indicate they were virus free.

Meanwhile, in Indonesia, large-scale restrictions in its capital were set to continue as new COVID-19 cases rise, with cinemas and other indoor entertainment spaces to remain closed.

“It will be very risky if we loosen the first phase of large-scale social restrictions to the second phase. So we decided to extend the social restrictions,” said Jakarta Gov. Anies Baswedan.

As of Thursday, 15,636 cases with 713 deaths had been recorded in Jakarta. The city imposed sweeping social restrictions on April 10 but relaxed some of them two months later. Indonesia as a whole has reported nearly 82,000 coronavirus cases and more than 3,800 deaths.

South Africa now has the world’s sixth highest reported caseload, with 324,221 cases accounting for more than half the total confirmed in Africa. Many are clustered in South Africa’s densely populated Gauteng province, home of Johannesburg and one-quarter of the country’s population.

Officials in South Korea said they might be making headway in capping outbreaks that have expanded from the capital, Seoul.

South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still reported 60 newly confirmed infections, including 39 linked to people arriving from abroad.

But a senior Health Ministry official, Yoon Tae-ho, told reporters that the imported cases were less of a concern than local ones because they would be caught in a mandatory 14-day quarantine for all people arriving from abroad. All are to be tested within 3 days.

More than 13.7 million infections have been confirmed worldwide and nearly 590,000 have died, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are likely higher for various reasons, including limited testing.

Two-week quarantines are becoming the norm, and many governments have been rolling back reopenings and tightening restrictions to try to stave off further waves of new cases.

Australia’s most populous state, New South Wales, on Friday announced increased pandemic restrictions after detecting eight new COVID-19 cases in a cluster that began in a Sydney pub and was traced to a visitor from Melbourne. Around 42 cases have since been linked to that cluster.

Authorities were hoping that fresh controls might bring the infection count to a plateau, as Melbourne reported a record 428 new COVID-19 cases on Friday.

Other parts of Australia have been relaxing restrictions. The Northern Territory on Friday opened its borders to everyone in Australia apart from Sydney and Victoria state, where Melbourne is located. Travelers from those restricted places must isolate in a hotel for 14 days.

Western Australia state, which is free of community-spread COVID-19, on Thursday hosted the largest public event since the pandemic began when more than 22,000 spectators watched an Australian rules football match at Perth Stadium. Medical groups condemned the match as dangerous to public health.

The coronavirus has been surging in hot spots around the U.S., with record numbers of confirmed infections and deaths in the South and West.

Hospitals are stretched to the brink in many areas amid fears the pandemic’s resurgence is only getting started. The rebound after shutdowns imposed in April were lifted has led to requirements for masks or other facial coverings in at least half of the 50 states.

Texas reported 10,000 new cases for the third straight day and 129 additional deaths. A third of its more than 3,400 total COVID-19 fatalities came in the first two weeks of July alone.

Florida reached another ominous record, with 156 virus deaths, and a staggering 13,965 new cases.

Reminiscent of New York City at the height of the pandemic there earlier this year, in Arizona the Phoenix medical examiner’s office is stocking up on storage coolers for an influx of bodies as funeral homes hit maximum capacity, with regular morgue storage nearly two-thirds full as of Thursday.

In Texas, San Antonio health officials have turned to refrigerated trailers to store the dead, and soldiers were preparing to take over a COVID-19 wing of a Houston hospital.

In hospitals in Hildago County, about 220 miles (354 kilometers) south of San Antonio on the Mexican border, it’s not uncommon for the body of a COVID-19 patient to lay on a stretcher for 10 hours before it can be removed in the overcrowded intensive care units, said Dr. Ivan Melendez, the county public health authority.

“Before someone gets a bed in the COVID ICU unit, someone has to die there,” Melendez said.

___

Merchant reported from Houston, Texas. Associated Press reporters around the world contributed to this report.

India says Indian, Chinese troops disengaging from standoff

India says Indian, Chinese troops disengaging from standoff

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Strategic considerations’: John Roberts’ swing votes all about politics, court watchers say

Quiz: Can you pass the Declaration of Independence test?

Misguided ‘defund police’ movement undercuts effort to change culture, experts warn

Quiz: Do you remember the 2000s?

Mayflower Hotel speech drove liberal media overkill, empty Russia scandal

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Race hustlers take “diversity” scam to new levels by enforcing leftist agenda

Everett Piper

Hillsdale College stands out for its courage in face of liberal onslaught

Michael McKenna

President Trump can win. Here’s how.

View all

Question of the Day

Should Bubba Wallace apologize, as Trump suggested?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By ASHOK SHARMA

Associated Press

Saturday, July 11, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) – India’s external affairs minister said Saturday that Indian and Chinese troops are disengaging from a monthslong standoff along the countries’ undemarcated border following a clash last month that left at least 20 Indian soldiers dead.

Subrahmanyam Jaishankar’s remarks came a day after China’s ambassador to India said that Indian and Chinese front-line troops are disengaging in accordance with an agreement reached by their military commanders.

“It’s very much a work in progress,” Jaishankar said, adding that both sides agreed on the need to disengage because troops are deployed very close to each other.

TOP STORIES

Judge approves petition to recall Seattle mayor

Biden VP hopeful, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, fails with COVID-19 response

Feds reject Minnesota request for funds to fix protest damage

The Chinese ambassador, Sun Weidong, said Friday that the two countries should be partners rather than rivals and handle their differences properly to bring their ties back on the right track.

Indian officials say a standoff between the two armies began in early May when large contingents of Chinese soldiers entered deep inside Indian-controlled territory at three places in Ladakh.

The situation turned deadly when the rival troops engaged in hand-to-hand fighting in the Galwan Valley, where India is building a strategic road connecting the region to an airstrip close to China. India says that 20 of its soldiers were killed in the June 15 clash and that there were casualties on the Chinese side as well.

China hasn’t confirmed any casualties on its side.

Through video conferencing on Friday, senior foreign ministry officials from the two countries reviewed the progress made in the disengagement process by the two armies at the disputed border, known as the Line of Actual Control.

The disputed border covers about 3,500 kilometers (2,175 miles) of frontier and stretches from Ladakh in the north to the Indian state of Sikkim in the northeast.

India and China fought a border war in 1962 that also spilled into Ladakh. The two countries have been trying to settle their border dispute since the early 1990s, without success.

Indian forces kill 6 Naga rebels near Myanmar border

Indian forces kill 6 Naga rebels near Myanmar border

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Strategic considerations’: John Roberts’ swing votes all about politics, court watchers say

Quiz: Can you pass the Declaration of Independence test?

Misguided ‘defund police’ movement undercuts effort to change culture, experts warn

Quiz: Do you remember the 2000s?

Mayflower Hotel speech drove liberal media overkill, empty Russia scandal

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

President Trump can win. Here’s how.

Charles Hurt

The Unbearable Whiteness of Being … Joe Biden

Scott Walker

How to fix the U.S. debt crisis

View all

Question of the Day

Should Bubba Wallace apologize, as Trump suggested?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By WASBIR HUSSAIN

Associated Press

Saturday, July 11, 2020

GAUHATI, India (AP) – India’s security forces killed six separatist Naga militants in an exchange of gunfire in a northeastern state bordering Myanmar, police said.

The fighting took place early Saturday as India’s paramilitary soldiers and police officers raided a militant hideout in a thick forest in Arunachal Pradesh state, said state police chief R.P. Upadhayay.

One soldier was injured in the fighting, but his condition is stable, he said.

TOP STORIES

Trump proves Black workers matter

'Tucker Carlson Tonight' writer resigns from Fox News after CNN uncovers bigoted internet posts

Black Lives Matter protester shoots SUV driver; police say second bullet went through rear window

The security forces recovered six assault rifles, 500 bullets and two homemade bombs from the rebels, he said.

Upadhayay said the insurgents belonged to the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (Isak-Muivah) group, which demands an independent homeland in India’s northeast, where nearly 2 million Naga tribespeople live mainly in Nagaland, Manipur, Assam and Arunachal Pradesh state.

The insurgents use their hideouts in Myanmar through Arunachal Pradesh state.

The group is in peace talks with the Indian government since 1997. It signed a preliminary agreement in 2015. It observes a cease-fire in Nagaland state, but attacks government forces elsewhere in the region.

China envoy: Indian, Chinese troops disengaging after clash

China envoy: Indian, Chinese troops disengaging after clash

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Strategic considerations’: John Roberts’ swing votes all about politics, court watchers say

Quiz: Can you pass the Declaration of Independence test?

Misguided ‘defund police’ movement undercuts effort to change culture, experts warn

Quiz: Do you remember the 2000s?

Mayflower Hotel speech drove liberal media overkill, empty Russia scandal

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Charles Hurt

The Unbearable Whiteness of Being … Joe Biden

Scott Walker

How to fix the U.S. debt crisis

Cal Thomas

Democrats want to impose socialism, and worse, on America

View all

Question of the Day

Should Bubba Wallace apologize, as Trump suggested?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By ASHOK SHARMA

Associated Press

Friday, July 10, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) – China’s ambassador to India said Friday that Indian and Chinese front-line troops are disengaging in accordance with an agreement reached by military commanders following a clash last month that left at least 20 soldiers dead in the Galwan Valley.

Ambassador Sun Weidong said the two countries should be partners rather than rivals and handle differences properly to bring their ties back on the right track.

In video remarks released in New Delhi, the Chinese envoy said the two countries have the wisdom and capability to properly handle differences.

TOP STORIES

Resignations, clashes leave Pentagon with gaping holes in upper ranks

'They're Marxists': Sen. John Kennedy labels 'Squad' members Omar, Pressley, Tlaib

NYC mayor nixes large events — except Black Lives Matter protests

“We should seek common development as partners rather than opponents or adversaries. Why should we fight against each other, which will only hurt those close to us and gladden the foes?” he said.

Indian officials say a standoff between the two armies began in early May when large contingents of Chinese soldiers entered deep inside Indian-controlled territory at three places in Ladakh.

The situation turned deadly when the rival troops engaged in hand-to-hand fighting in the Galwan Valley, where India is building a strategic road connecting the region to an airstrip close to China. India says 20 of its soldiers were killed and there were casualties on the Chinese side as well.

As part of an understanding reached in a series of meetings between army commanders from the two sides, soldiers have started pulling back at some points in the troubled area.

Senior foreign ministry officials of the two countries through video conferencing on Friday reviewed the progress made in ongoing disengagement process by the two armies at the disputed border that the two countries call the Line Of Actual Control.

The sides reaffirmed that they “will ensure complete disengagement of the troops along the Line of Actual Control and de-escalation from IndiaChina border areas for full restoration of peace and tranquility” in accordance with bilateral agreements and protocols, said a statement issued by India’s External Affairs Ministry.

The Chinese envoy said the boundary question remains sensitive and complicated.

“We need to find a fair and reasonable solution mutually acceptable through equal consultation and peaceful negotiation. Pending an ultimate settlement, we both agree to work together to maintain peace and tranquility in the border areas,” he said.

The disputed border covers about 3,500 kilometers (2,175 miles) of frontier and stretches from Ladakh in the north to the Indian state of Sikkim in the northeast.

India and China fought a border war in 1962 that also spilled into Ladakh. The two countries have been trying to settle their border dispute since the early 1990s, without success.

China sends warning to India amid border clash fallout

China sends warning to India amid border clash fallout

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Morale is lower with White officers’ in wake of George Floyd’s death in police custody

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

Grim math of the border: Media hypes ‘haunting’ deaths, ignores thousands of rescues

Quiz: Can you match the nickname to the Major League Baseball player?

Benjamin Netanyahu maintaining vow to annex West Bank land by July 1

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Left-wing activist wants to replace ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ with Lennon’s ‘Imagine’

Charles Hurt

Vulture Joe Biden no Atticus Finch

Scott Walker

Celebrating an exceptional country on Independence Day

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By

Associated Press

Friday, July 3, 2020

BEIJING (AP) – China on Friday warned India against making a “strategic miscalculation” following a bloody clash last month between forces from the two nuclear-armed Asian giants along their disputed border.

Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian called on India to “work with China to safeguard the overall situation of bilateral relations” and criticized Indian officials for making what he called irresponsible remarks.

India should not make a strategic miscalculation on China,” Zhao told reporters at a daily briefing.

TOP STORIES

'We are ONE America': Ted Cruz blasts NFL's reported plans to play 'Black national anthem'

Supreme Court blocks order relaxing Alabama absentee voting requirements

'Shattering expectations': 'Trump hails strong jobs report

Responding to public outrage over the June 15 clash that left 20 Indian troops dead, New Delhi has banned Chinese smart phone apps and banned Chinese companies from working on road projects.

Zhao said those moves violated World Trade Organization rules and said Beijing would “take necessary measures to safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of Chinese enterprises in India.”

U.S., South Africa report new record coronavirus rises

U.S., South Africa report new record coronavirus rises

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Morale is lower with White officers’ in wake of George Floyd’s death in police custody

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

Grim math of the border: Media hypes ‘haunting’ deaths, ignores thousands of rescues

Quiz: Can you match the nickname to the Major League Baseball player?

Benjamin Netanyahu maintaining vow to annex West Bank land by July 1

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Scott Walker

Celebrating an exceptional country on Independence Day

Daniel N. Hoffman

Gina Haspel and CIA stream recruitment efforts

Michael McKenna

Collins is GOP’s best bet in Georgia; Loeffler should recognize that

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

In this Thursday, June 18, 2020, file photo, patrons fill the Crow Bar in Sioux Falls, S.D. Authorities are closing bars and other drinking establishments in some parts of the U.S. to stem the surge of COVID-19 infections — a … more >

Print

By David Rising and Jake Coyle

Associated Press

Thursday, July 2, 2020

BERLIN (AP) — The United States and South Africa have both reported record new daily coronavirus infections, with U.S. figures surpassing 50,000 cases a day for the first time, underlining the challenges still ahead as nations press to reopen their virus-devastated economies.

The U.S. recorded 50,700 new cases, according to a tally kept by Johns Hopkins University, as many states struggled to contain the spread of the pandemic, blamed in part on Americans not wearing masks or following social distancing rules.

Surging numbers in California prompted Gov. Gavin Newsom to announce just ahead of the Fourth of July weekend that he was closing bars, theaters and indoor restaurant dining over most of the state, a region that includes about 30 million people and Los Angeles County.

TOP STORIES

Black Lives Matter protester shoots SUV driver; police say second bullet went through rear window

Joe Biden gathers 600 lawyers to prepare for possible 'chicanery' ahead of November election

CBO predicts V-shaped recovery, GDP growth to top 12% for rest of 2020

“The bottom line is the spread of this virus continues at a rate that is particularly concerning,” Newsom said.

Confirmed cases in California have increased nearly 50% over the past two weeks, and COVID-19 hospitalizations have gone up 43%. Newsom said California had nearly 5,900 new cases and 110 more deaths in just 24 hours.

Infections have been surging in many other states as well, including Florida, Arizona and Texas. Florida recorded more than 6,500 new cases and counties in South Florida were closing beaches to fend off large July Fourth crowds that could further spread the virus.

“Too many people were crowding into restaurants late at night, turning these establishments into breeding grounds for this deadly virus,” Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez said.

Despite the fact that the U.S. has the highest number of infections and deaths in the world by far, President Donald Trump seemed confident the coronavirus would soon subside.

“I think we are going to be very good with the coronavirus,” he told Fox Business. “I think that, at some point, that’s going to sort of just disappear, I hope.”

The U.S. has now reported nearly 2.7 million cases and more than 128,000 dead. Globally there have been 10.7 million coronavirus cases and more than 516,000 dead, according to Johns Hopkins’ count. The true toll of the pandemic is believed to be significantly higher, in part because of limited testing and mild cases that have been missed.

In South Africa on Thursday, authorities reported 8,124 new cases, a new daily record. The country has the most cases in Africa with more than 159,000, as it loosens what had been one of the world’s strictest lockdowns.

Johannesburg is a new hot spot with hundreds of health workers infected and Gauteng province, which includes Johannesburg, has more than 45,000 confirmed cases. The African continent has more than 405,000 confirmed cases overall.

India, the world’s second-most populous country with more than 1.3 billion people, surpassed 600,000 infections on Thursday after over 19,000 new cases were reported. India has reported nearly 100,000 new cases in the past four days alone.

Despite the surging numbers, the western beach of state of Goa, a popular backpacking destination, allowed 250 hotels to reopen Thursday after being closed for more than three months. Tourists will either have to carry COVID-19 negative certificates or get tested on arrival.

Many industries and businesses have reopened across the country, and Indians have cautiously returned to the streets. Schools, colleges and movie theaters are still closed.

On the medical front, the World Health Organization says smoking is linked to a higher risk of severe illness and death from the coronavirus in hospitalized patients, although it was unable to specify exactly how much greater those risks might be.

In a scientific brief published this week, the U.N. health agency reviewed 34 published studies on the association between smoking and COVID-19, including the probability of infection, hospitalization, severity of disease and death.

WHO noted that smokers represent up to 18% of hospitalized coronavirus patients and that there appeared to be a significant link between whether or not patients smoked and the severity of disease they suffered, the type of hospital interventions required and patients’ risk of dying.

In Japan, the capital of Tokyo confirmed 107 new cases of coronavirus, nearly triple that of June 24, just before the number began to spike. Tokyo Gov. Yuriko Koike said many cases were linked to nightclubs and bars, and urged their workers to proactively be tested and take further safety measures.

“We need to use caution against the spread of the infections,” Koike said.

South Korea confirmed 54 more COVID-19 cases as the coronavirus continued to spread beyond the capital region and reach cities like Gwangju, which has shut schools and tightened social restrictions after dozens fell sick this week.

Despite the spike in many U.S. states, several eastern states have seen their new infections slow down significantly, including New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island and New Jersey, which was going ahead Thursday with allowing its famous Atlantic City casinos to reopen.

Strict social distancing and other measures will be in place. Gamblers will not be allowed to smoke, drink or eat anything inside the casinos. They will have to wear masks in public areas of the casino and have their temperatures checked upon entering.

___

Coyle reported from Los Angeles.

Pakistan: Exchange of fire with India kills boy in Kashmir

Pakistan: Exchange of fire with India kills boy in Kashmir

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Morale is lower with White officers’ in wake of George Floyd’s death in police custody

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

Grim math of the border: Media hypes ‘haunting’ deaths, ignores thousands of rescues

Quiz: Can you match the nickname to the Major League Baseball player?

Benjamin Netanyahu maintaining vow to annex West Bank land by July 1

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Collins is GOP’s best bet in Georgia; Loeffler should recognize that

David Keene

The cost of demonizing the police

Cal Thomas

Unpredictable John Roberts lets Supreme Court affirm abortion ideology over women’s health

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By

Associated Press

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

ISLAMABAD (AP) – Pakistani and Indian troops have traded fire in Kashmir in an exchange that killed a boy in the Pakistan-controlled section of the disputed Himalayan region, officials said Wednesday.

In a statement, Pakistan’s military said India targeted civilian residents with artillery, mortars and other weapons the previous night in the border village of Lipa.

India, however, blamed Pakistani troops for initiating the fire. Rajesh Kalia, an Indian army spokesperson, said Pakistani troops in an unprovoked cease-fire violation targeted the villages of Naugam and Baramulla. He said the Indian side responded adequately.

TOP STORIES

Black Lives Matter protester shoots SUV driver; police say second bullet went through rear window

D.C. sued over Black Lives Matter painted on city streets

Terry Crews sparks outrage with Black Lives Matter tweet: 'White people can have you'

The two nuclear-armed countries often trade fire in Kashmir, which is split between them but claimed by both in its entirety. Since gaining independence from British rule in 1947, the the two sides have fought two of their three wars over Kashmir. India accuses Pakistan of aiding separatists in its part of Kashmir, a charge Pakistan denies.

The latest deadly exchange happened hours after dozens of Indian and Pakistani diplomats and embassy staff returned home to India and Pakistan.

India had earlier ordered Pakistan to reduce its embassy staff in New Delhi by half and recalled half of its own embassy staff in Islamabad, following the arrest of two of its embassy employees over a hit-and-run road accident.

Despite the uproar, Pakistan and India stuck to an agreement to share – as they do every July 1 – the updated lists of one another’s prisoners. Islamabad on Wednesday handed over the names of 324 Indian prisoners it holds while New Delhi handed over a list with the names of 362 Pakistani prisoners held in India.

Testing stepped up as number of new coronavirus cases surges

Testing stepped up as number of new coronavirus cases surges

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Morale is lower with White officers’ in wake of George Floyd’s death in police custody

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

Grim math of the border: Media hypes ‘haunting’ deaths, ignores thousands of rescues

Quiz: Can you match the nickname to the Major League Baseball player?

Benjamin Netanyahu maintaining vow to annex West Bank land by July 1

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Authoritarian decisions on masks and gender identity leads to surly, if any, compliance by Americans

Richard W. Rahn

How China and Jeff Bezos benefit from BLM protests, businesses burned and monuments destroyed

Robert Knight

Democrats bless stimulus checks that flow to strip clubs and the dead

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

People wearing face masks to help protect against the spread of the new coronavirus cross a road in Seoul, Monday, June 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) more >

Print

By Emily Schmall and Elaine Kurtenbach

Associated Press

Monday, June 29, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) — Governments were stepping up testing and warily considering their next moves Monday as the number of newly confirmed coronavirus cases surges in many countries. India reported 20,000 new cases Monday, while the U.S. confirmed more than 40,000 new infections for the the third straight day.

As infections rise along with summer temperatures in the northern hemisphere, many governments are stepping up testing and mulling more aggressive moves such as renewed lockdowns to stem fresh outbreaks.

India’s 20,000 new infections was a new daily record. Several states reimposed partial or full lockdowns after the total number of cases jumped by nearly 100,000 in one week to 548,318.

TOP STORIES

'Out of control': Three children among dead from weekend violence in Chicago

'Enough is enough': 16-year-old boy killed in latest CHOP shooting

White House says intel officials haven't reached consensus on report of Russian bounties

While some states have tightened precautions, in the worst-affected regions of Maharashtra, which includes India’s financial capital, Mumbai, and Delhi, home to the federal capital of New Delhi, most restrictions have been eased, with restaurants, shopping malls and parks reopened, and public buses and shared-ride services back on the roads.

The United States, the worst affected country, reported 42,600 newly confirmed infections as of Saturday, with the total surpassing 2.5 million, or about a quarter of all of the more than 10 million confirmed cases worldwide, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University. Experts say the actual numbers, both in the U.S. and globally, are likely far higher due to the large number of apparently asymptomatic cases and issues with testing.

Beaches were closing and beer was going untapped as Florida, Texas and other states backpedaled on their pandemic reopenings, ordering mandatory use of masks in public places and closing down restaurants and bars in hopes of stemming a resurgence in cases.

Nearly 8.3 million people out of some 21 million have undergone testing in recent weeks in the Chinese capital after an outbreak centered on a wholesale market. The country had 12 new cases Monday, including seven in Beijing, down by more than half from the day before, the National Health Commission reported.

South Korean authorities reported 47 new cases as they struggled to curb outbreaks that have spread from Seoul to other regions.

Widespread testing and contact tracing helped contain South Korea’s initial outbreak in which it was finding hundreds of new cases a day in late February and early March. Most of those cases were in the area surrounding city of Daegu, where many were linked to a single church congregation with thousands of members.

Tracing recent transmissions in the Seoul metropolitan area, home to about about half of the country’s 51 million people, has proved to be more difficult.

South Korean health officials have said they are ready to implement stronger social distancing measures — including banning all gatherings of more than 10 people, shutting schools, halting professional sports, and restricting operations of non-essential businesses – if the daily increase in infections doubles more than two times in a week.

Health authorities are using what they describe as a world-first saliva test for coronavirus in Australia’s second-largest city, Melbourne in the state of Victoria, where the disease is spreading at an alarming rate.

Victorian Health Minister Jenny Mikakos said Monday that 75 people had tested positive in the state in the latest 24 hours, bringing the total number of cases to 2,099.

Brett Sutton, Victoria’s chief health officer, said the outbreak could surge out of control as pandemic restrictions ease elsewhere in Australia.

“l think it’s a genuine challenge now. I think we’re right at the edge in terms of being able to manage it,” Sutton said.

In the Philippines, local officials were under fire for allowing a street parade and dance during a weekend religious festival to honor St. John the Baptist despite quarantine prohibitions against public gatherings.

Performers in native wear and face masks danced during the night procession, which drew a large crowd in Basak village on Cebu, in the central Philippines.

The Philippines remains a Southeast Asian coronavirus hotspot with more than 35,000 confirmed infections, including 1,244 deaths. Restrictions have been eased in many places to help salvage the ailing economy, but Cebu resumed a strict lockdown this month after new cases spiked.

Some governments are pushing ahead with reopening travel, particularly between countries where outbreaks of the virus appear to be contained, though the changing landscape of the pandemic suggests the process will be complicated and subject to change.

The European Union is preparing a list of 15 countries whose nationals will be allowed to visit the bloc beginning Wednesday, Spain’s foreign minister, Arancha Gonzalez Laya, told the Cadena SER radio network.

The resurgence of cases in the U.S. means Americans may not be on that list. Gonzalez Laya said countries will be chosen according to their coronavirus status and the reliability of their data, she said.

“This is not an exercise to be nice or unfriendly to other countries, this is an exercise of self-responsibility,” she said. She confirmed that Spain will reopen its borders with Portugal despite rising infections there.

Meanwhile, civil aviation authorities in the United Arab Emirates announced they had suspended all flights to Pakistan until a “special laboratory” could be set up to conduct coronavirus tests for people traveling from the country to the UAE.

The UAE’s state-run WAM news agency issued a statement late Sunday from the country’s General Civil Aviation Authority announcing the decision.

Pakistan resumed international travel earlier this month even as its critics said the airport precautions were limited and ineffective. Last week, Pakistani media reported 27 passengers traveling from Pakistan arrived in Hong Kong and tested positive for COVID-19. The passengers had transited through the UAE.

___

Kurtenbach reported from Bangkok. Associated Press reporters from around the world contributed to this report.

Satellite images show buildup on disputed India-China border

Satellite images show buildup on disputed India-China border

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘A fundamental challenge’: William Barr says U.S. is cracking down on Chinese spying

Quiz: Do you remember these popular TV couples?

EXCLUSIVE: U.K. assassination attempt reveals illegal Russian chemical weapons push

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton; predicts historic economic recovery

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Democrats bless stimulus checks that flow to strip clubs and the dead

Cheryl K. Chumley

American individualism falling to socialism, globalism, collectivism

David Keene

Rioters who burned police stations and businesses may find their nemesis, Trump, reelected

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

This combination of May 22, 2020, left, and June 23 satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies shows construction in the Galwan river valley near the disputed border known as the Line of Actual Control between India and China. On Monday, … more >

Print

By SAM MCNEIL and EMILY SCHMALL

Associated Press

Saturday, June 27, 2020

BEIJING (AP) – Construction activity appeared underway on both the Indian and Chinese sides of a contested border high in the Karakoram mountains a week after a deadly clash in the area left 20 Indian soldiers dead, satellite images showed.

The images released this week by Maxar, a Colorado-based satellite imagery company, show new construction activity along the Galwan River Valley, even as Chinese and Indian diplomats said military commanders had agreed to disengage from a standoff there.

The images appeared to show that the Indians had built a wall on their side and the Chinese had expanded an outpost camp at the end of a long road connected to Chinese military bases farther from the poorly defined border, according to experts.

TOP STORIES

Gunning for The Duke: Dems push to rename John Wayne Airport, say he was 'racist and bigoted'

Parler topples 'tech tyrant' Twitter in Apple 'News App' store

Report: Minneapolis council members who voted to abolish police get taxpayer-funded private security

The contradictions in words and deeds showed the fragility of an agreement following the worst violence since the Asian giants went to war in 1962 over their competing claims to the arid border region, experts said.

China has said that India first changed the status quo last August when it split the state of Jammu and Kashmir into two federal territories – the territory of Jammu and Kashmir and the territory of Ladakh, parts of which are contested by China.

The new maps released by India following the move drew criticism from Beijing because they showed Aksai Chin – an area administered by China but contested by India – as part of Ladakh.

Indian officials said the standoff that culminated in this month’s deadly clash in the Galwan Valley, part of a remote stretch of the 3,380-kilometer (2,100-mile) Line of Actual Control, or LAC, established following the 1962 war, began in early May when large contingents of Chinese soldiers entered deep inside Indian-controlled territory at three places in Ladakh, erecting tents.

After a few skirmishes in May, Indian and Chinese commanders met June 6 to hash out an agreement that would reduce tensions.

The two sides agreed to build observation posts on either side of the mouth of the Galwan River, China’s ambassador to India, Sun Weidong, told the Press Trust of India news agency on Tuesday.

Indian foreign ministry spokesperson Anurag Srivastava said that during the June 6 meeting “both sides had agreed to respect and abide by the LAC and not undertake any activity to alter the status quo,” but did not address whether they had agreed to observation posts.

Around midnight on June 15, soldiers attacked each other with rocks, clubs and their fists in the Galwan Valley, the deadliest violence between the two countries in 45 years.

Indian security officials said the fatalities were caused by severe injuries and exposure to subfreezing temperatures. China has not said whether it suffered any casualties in the clash.

India and China have blamed each other for the melee and staked fresh claims on the area where it occurred.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said Wednesday that the confrontation occurred on China’s side of the Line of Actual Control, and that Indian forces had illegally entered Chinese territory.

“The responsibility (for the incident) is entirely not on the Chinese side,” Zhao said.

But Srivastava said Thursday that China had provoked the fight when its soldiers “sought to erect structures just across the LAC” on the Indian side. He said Indian soldiers foiled the attempts.

However, a sequence of Maxar images of the river bend where the clash occurred in the weeks before and after the clash showed that construction had expanded up the Galwan Valley toward the Line of Actual Control from Chinese bases, Maxar Vice President Steve Wood said.

Wood said that since May 22, satellite images showed “convoy after convoy of heavy trucks, diggers, bulldozers and some military armored equipment” rolling down the Galwan Valley toward the disputed border.

Before and after the fatal clash, China was moving construction equipment, soldiers and military hardware toward the LAC, said Chris Biggers, senior analyst at the geospatial intelligence company HawkEye 360.

“The Chinese were obviously pushing toward the junction and what they perceive as their claim line. They have now built a post and a track reinforcing their claim, thus changing the status quo in the area,” he said.

At that junction, the Galwan River turns west toward an important supply route for a key Indian airfield. Biggers said that satellite imagery shows that India has built a stone wall there facing the new Chinese post, with a layered set of barriers draped in camouflage netting and tarps that “could also function as fighting positions.”

“We also see quite a bit of activity on the road, with trucks moving in both directions as well as troops marching in formation along the new track,” Biggers said.

___

Schmall reported from New Delhi.

New satellite imagery show new Chinese structure buildup along Indian border

New satellite imagery show new Chinese structure buildup along Indian border

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘A fundamental challenge’: William Barr says U.S. is cracking down on Chinese spying

Quiz: Do you remember these popular TV couples?

EXCLUSIVE: U.K. assassination attempt reveals illegal Russian chemical weapons push

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton; predicts historic economic recovery

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Scott Walker

Ignorant rioters take violence to Madison and leftist Democrats do nothing

Victor Davis Hanson

Anger will decide the 2020 election

Michael McKenna

Presidential election polling not broken, Trump trails Biden

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

A Karni Sena supporter tears a banner featuring Chinese President Xi Jinping and shout slogans during a protest against China in Ahmedabad, India, Wednesday, June 24, 2020. Chinese and Indian military commanders have agreed to disengage their forces in a … more >

Print

By Lauren Meier

The Washington Times

Thursday, June 25, 2020

New satellite imagery along the IndiaChina border shows a buildup of structures near the site of a recent clash between both sides that left Indian and Chinese troops dead.

The images, dated April 22 and obtained by Reuters Thursday from space technology company Maxar, show a slew of new tents, bunkers and storage units that are believed to hold military hardware built up in the disputed Himalayan territory of Ladakh.

Although the two sides have apparently adhered to a firearms ban, they have also reportedly positioned tanks, armored personnel carriers and armed troops not far from each other in the Galwan Valley.

TOP STORIES

Facebook moderators brag about deleting pro-Trump posts in Project Veritas sting

Congressman calls for Gov. Evers to resign after mob allegedly beats up Wisconsin state legislator

Businesses, residents sue Seattle over CHOP

Clashes in the high-altitude region have been breaking out for weeks as troops from the two sides massed in disputed territory off India’s northern tip, the latest clash marked the first time in decades that any soldiers were killed — sparking fears of a wider escalation between the world’s two most populous nations.

The battle erupted after weeks of assertions from both sides that they were trying to ease tensions and forge a diplomatic solution. Talks have since begun between both parties in an attempt to diffuse the deadly dispute.

The latest images appear to show the buildup on the Chinese side of the Galwan River. While neither side has publicly acknowledged the structures, India’s foreign ministry on Wednesday stated that the Indian and Chinese foreign ministers have “reaffirmed that both sides should sincerely implement the understanding on disengagement and de-escalation that was reached by the senior commanders on 6 June.”

Border tensions last soared between New Delhi and Beijing in 2017. More recently, analysts say, China has been eager to press its claims amid global geopolitical uncertainty and a COVID-19 pandemic that many in India blame on China.

Relations between the nations have been generally stable but increasingly complex in recent years as China challenges America’s status as India’s top trading partner.

China blames India for border clash, urges stability

China blames India for border clash, urges stability

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘A fundamental challenge’: William Barr says U.S. is cracking down on Chinese spying

Quiz: Do you remember these popular TV couples?

EXCLUSIVE: U.K. assassination attempt reveals illegal Russian chemical weapons push

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton; predicts historic economic recovery

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Presidential election polling not broken, Trump trails Biden

Andrew P. Napolitano

Tearing down statues risks rewriting American history and forgetting its slavery roots

David Keene

Removing the military mindset in police departments

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

This June 22, 2020, satellite image provided by Maxar Technologies shows the Line of Actual Control (LAC), the border between India and China. Chinese and Indian military commanders agreed to disengage their forces in the disputed area of the Himalayas … more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

BEIJING (AP) — China on Wednesday again accused India of provoking a border clash earlier this month that left at least 20 soldiers dead, but urged New Delhi to “meet China halfway” in restoring peace and stability along their disputed frontier high in the Himalayas.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian offered a longer explanation of China’s view of the incident but gave little new information.

He reasserted China’s claim that the confrontation on June 15 in the Galwan Valley, part of the disputed Ladakh region, occurred on China’s side of the Actual Line of Control and Indian forces had illegally entered Chinese territory.

TOP STORIES

Michael Flynn case dismissed by federal appeals court

Tommy Lee warns 'Trumpsters': 'We are going to pay you back so f-ing hard for all of this'

Andrew Cuomo defends destruction of U.S. monuments: 'It's a healthy expression'

“The responsibility (for the incident) is entirely not on the Chinese side,” Zhao said at a daily briefing.

“The reckless actions by the Indian military seriously violated agreements signed between the two countries and seriously violated the basic principles of international relations. They were evil in nature and the consequences were severe,” Zhao said.

Commanders agreed Monday to disengage their forces in their first meeting since the confrontation.

The clash was the deadliest between the two countries in 45 years. India said 20 of its soldiers died. China has not released any information on casualties on its side.

Soldiers brawled with clubs, rocks and their fists at 4,270 meters (14,000 feet) above sea level, but no shots were fired, Indian officials have said. The soldiers carry firearms but are not allowed to use them under a previous agreement in the border dispute.

Indian security officials said the fatalities were caused by severe injuries and exposure to subfreezing temperatures.

The valley falls within a remote stretch of the 3,380-kilometer (2,100-mile) Line of Actual Control – the border established following a war between India and China in 1962 that resulted in an uneasy truce.

Zhao said talks held Monday and Tuesday resulted in both sides agreeing to take necessary measures to cool the situation and promote peace and stability.

“We hope the Indian side will strictly abide by and seriously implement the above consensus and meet China halfway and through practical actions, restore peace and stability in the border region,” Zhao said.

Asked why China was offering such a lengthy defense of its position when the sides had already agreed to reduce tensions, Zhao said that was to counter a “large amount of fake news” on the matter being circulated by Indian diplomats and the country’s media.

A nearly identical statement was issued by China’s Defense Ministry, which said Chinese troops had taken “defensive measures and determinedly counterattacked against the Indian side’s violent actions, successfully protecting national sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

The latest tensions appear to be rooted in China’s objections to India building a road through a valley connecting the region to an airstrip, possibly sparking Beijing’s move to assert control over territory along the border that is not clearly defined in places.

In all, China claims some 90,000 square kilometers (35,000 square miles) of territory in India’s northeast, including the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, with its traditionally Buddhist population. India says China occupies 38,000 square kilometers (15,000 square miles) of its territory in the Aksai Chin Plateau in the western Himalayas, including part of the Ladakh region.

Moscow sees no need to mediate India-China standoff

Moscow sees no need to mediate India-China standoff

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘A fundamental challenge’: William Barr says U.S. is cracking down on Chinese spying

Quiz: Do you remember these popular TV couples?

EXCLUSIVE: U.K. assassination attempt reveals illegal Russian chemical weapons push

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton; predicts historic economic recovery

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Joseph Curl

Trollmaster Trump gets pwned by Zoomer trollsters

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

Democrats recycle fascism with statue smashers, flag burners and book burners

Peter Morici

How a V-shaped economic recovery could happen

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov listens as Serbia’s President Aleksandar Vucic speaks during a joint press conference in Belgrade, Serbia, Thursday, June 18, 2020. Lavrov is on a two-day official visit to Serbia. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic) more >

Print

By VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV

Associated Press

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

MOSCOW (AP) – Russia will not be stepping in to mediate between China and India following a deadly border clash in the Himalayas, the country’s foreign minister said Tuesday.

Sergey Lavrov said after a video call with his Chinese and Indian counterparts that Beijing and New Delhi don’t need outside assistance to settle their differences.

“We never had a goal to help India and China develop their bilateral ties,” Lavrov said in a call with reporters. “India and China have every opportunity to tackle and solve any problems in relations between them.”

TOP STORIES

Shaun King says Jesus images 'a form of white supremacy' that must go: 'They should all come down'

COVID-19 task force: Trump never ordered us to slow down testing

Russia releases Jehovah's Witness convicted of being 'extremist'

Lavrov spoke to Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar in the wake of last week’s clashes which saw 20 Indian soldiers die. China has not released any information on its casualties.

Soldiers brawled with clubs, rocks and their fists in the thin air at 4,270 meters (14,000 feet) above sea level. A previous agreement in the border dispute bans the use of firearms.

The confrontation in the Galwan Valley, part of the disputed Ladakh region along the Himalayan frontier, was the deadliest between the two countries in 45 years. India blames China for instigating the fight by developing infrastructure in the valley, which it said was a breach of the agreement of what area remained in dispute.

The valley falls within a remote stretch of the 3,380-kilometer (2,100-mile) Line of Actual Control – the border established following a war between India and China in 1962 that resulted in an uneasy truce.

Moscow has maintained close ties with both Beijing and New Delhi.

Lavrov also hailed India and China for sending contingents of soldiers to take part in Wednesday’s parade on Red Square marking the 75th anniversary of the Nazi defeat in World War II.

He also emphasized their close cooperation within the BRICS group of countries, which also includes Brazil, Russia and South Africa. He also noted that India’s entry into the Shanghai Cooperation Organization has helped bolster regional security.

China claims valley where Indian, Chinese soldiers brawled

China claims valley where Indian, Chinese soldiers brawled

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Liberals attack on American culture emboldened by Supreme Court last week

Everett Piper

Supreme Court rules women are no longer real but just fantasies

Cheryl K. Chumley

Pandering to the pretensions of Black Lives Matter overlords

View all

Question of the Day

Should Trump rally-goers in Tulsa wear face masks

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Exile Tibetans and local Indians burn a Chinese national flag during a protest in Dharmsala, India, Friday, June 19, 2020. India said Thursday it was using diplomatic channels with China to de-escalate a military standoff in a remote Himalayan border … more >

Print

By EMILY SCHMALL

Associated Press

Saturday, June 20, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) – China said the Galwan Valley high up in the Himalayan border region where Chinese and Indian troops engaged in a deadly brawl this week falls entirely within China, boldly renewing claims on the disputed area as the Asian giants continued using military and diplomatic channels to try to reduce tensions on Saturday.

The confrontation in the Galwan Valley, part of the disputed Ladakh region along the Himalayan frontier, was the deadliest between the two countries in 45 years. India blames China for instigating the fight by developing infrastructure in the valley, which it said was a breach of the agreement of what area remained in dispute.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said in a statement Friday that “the Galwan Valley is located on the Chinese side of the Line of Actual Control in the west section of the ChinaIndia boundary.”

TOP STORIES

Earthquake shakes Oklahoma after Trump's Tulsa rally

Pelosi rips Trump over testing remarks: 'The American people are owed answers'

Ben and Jerry's calls to 'defund the police,' 'dismantle the old system'

He blamed incursions by Indian troops in the area from early May for a midnight clash on Monday that left 20 Indian soldiers dead. China has not said whether it suffered any casualties.

Soldiers brawled with clubs, rocks and their fists in the thin air at 4,270 meters (14,000 feet) above sea level, but no shots were fired, Indian officials have said. The soldiers carry firearms but are not allowed to use them under a previous agreement in the border dispute.

Indian security officials have said the fatalities were caused by severe injuries and exposure to subfreezing temperatures.

The valley falls within a remote stretch of the 3,380-kilometer (2,100-mile) Line of Actual Control – the border established following a war between India and China in 1962 that resulted in an uneasy truce.

Indian Ministry of External Affairs spokesperson Anurag Srivastava repeated on Saturday that China’s claims to the valley were “exaggerated and untenable.”

“They are not in accordance with China’s own position in the past. Indian troops are fully familiar with the alignment of the (Line of Actual Control) in all sectors of the IndiaChina border areas, including in the Galwan Valley. They abide by it scrupulously here, as they do elsewhere,” Srivastava said in a statement.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in a meeting with political opposition leaders on Friday that no one “has intruded into our territory, nor taken over any post.”

Modi said India was “hurt and angry” about the deaths of its troops. He said India wanted peace and friendship, but had the “capability that no one can even dare look toward an inch of our land.”

Also on Friday, Zhao, the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson, said that China was not holding any Indian soldiers, without addressing media reports that China had released 10 of them late Thursday.

“My information is that at present there are no Indian personnel detained on the Chinese side,” Zhao said, according to an English version of his daily briefing posted on the ministry’s website.

Indian officials have denied that any soldiers were in Chinese custody.

China says it has not seized any Indian soldiers

China says it has not seized any Indian soldiers

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Tony Perkins

Justice Gorsuch botched Bostock v. Clayton County ruling on homosexual and transgender ‘rights’

David Keene

Bolton’s opinionated style never a good fit for Trump administration

Daniel N. Hoffman

Fighting the dark art of Russian disinformation this election season

View all

Question of the Day

Should Trump rally-goers in Tulsa wear face masks

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) members shout slogans as they burn an effigy of Chinese President Xi Jinping during a protest against China in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, June 19, 2020. India’s prime minister is meeting top opposition leaders Friday … more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Friday, June 19, 2020

BEIJING (AP) – China said Friday that it has not detained any Indian soldiers, following Indian media reports that China had released 10 of them late Thursday.

“As far as I know, currently China has not seized any Indian personnel,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said when asked about the report at a daily briefing.

He did not elaborate. Indian officials have also denied that Indian troops were in Chinese custody.

TOP STORIES

Chick-fil-A CEO urges white people to find strangers, 'shine their shoes' to combat racism

Trump rally grows into grand spectacle as crowd swells, controversy swirls

Rush Limbaugh rejects latest COVID-19 concerns: 'You can't believe the virus numbers'

The comments come as China blames India for a recent military clash at their border that left 20 people dead on the Indian side. China has not said whether any of its soldiers died.

Zhao said that “the right and wrong is very clear and the responsibility lies entirely with the Indian side.”

He added that the two sides are in communication over diplomatic and military channels.

“We hope India can work with China to maintain the long-term development of bilateral relations,” he said at a daily briefing.

This week’s confrontation in the Galwan Valley, part of the disputed Ladakh region along the Himalayan frontier, was the deadliest conflict between the sides in 45 years.

China foreign minister demands India punish those behind clashes, warns not to underestimate China’s

China foreign minister demands India punish those behind clashes, warns not to underestimate China’s

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cal Thomas

An opportunity in Tulsa for Trump to heal racial divisions

Victor Davis Hanson

The irrelevance of Black Lives Matter and death of cultural revolutions

Andrew P. Napolitano

Tyrannical governors ignore Constitution’s protection of religious freedom

View all

Question of the Day

Should Trump rally-goers in Tulsa wear face masks

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By

Associated Press

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

BEIJING (AP) – China foreign minister demands India punish those behind clashes, warns not to underestimate China’s determination.

Fatal clash in the Himalayas ups ante for China and India

Fatal clash in the Himalayas ups ante for China and India

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cal Thomas

An opportunity in Tulsa for Trump to heal racial divisions

Victor Davis Hanson

The irrelevance of Black Lives Matter and death of cultural revolutions

Andrew P. Napolitano

Tyrannical governors ignore Constitution’s protection of religious freedom

View all

Question of the Day

Should Trump rally-goers in Tulsa wear face masks

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Indians burn products made in China during a protest against the Chinese government in Lucknow, India, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. India and China sought Wednesday to de-escalate tensions following a fatal clash along a disputed border high in the Himalayas … more >

Print

By EMILY SCHMALL

Associated Press

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) – India and China sought Wednesday to de-escalate tensions after flexing their muscles in a fatal clash along a disputed border high in the Himalayas that left 20 Indian soldiers dead.

The skirmish Monday in the desolate alpine area of Ladakh, in Kashmir, followed changes by India to the political status of Kashmir amid a geopolitical tug-of-war with the United States in the region.

Chinese officials said Wednesday that both sides had agreed to peacefully resolve their Himalayan border tension through dialogue. India should “not take unilateral actions that might complication the situation,” said the Foreign Ministry in Beijing.

TOP STORIES

Four St. Louis police officers charged with beating undercover colleague

Evangelical pastors pander to radical Black Lives Matter

Judge rejects bid to stop Trump rally

Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in a speech Wednesday that “India wants peace but is capable of giving a befitting reply.” He has called a meeting of India’s major political parties on Friday to discuss the China situation.

At least 20 Indian soldiers, including a colonel, died of severe injuries suffered in sub-zero temperatures, Indian officials said, after the two sides threw rocks and traded blows in the culmination of a months-long standoff in the Galwan Valley near the Line of Actual Control that separates the two countries.

No shots were fired because neither side’s patrolling soldiers carry firearms, in accordance with the terms of the unresolved border dispute, Indian officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to disclose information.

Still, it was the worst violence since 1962, when a war over completing claims on the remote Himalayan area ended with an uneasy truce.

Thousands of soldiers backed by armored trucks and artillery have been facing off near the border. Scuffles are not uncommon, but Indian authorities say China upped the ante when its troops breached the line of control.

China accused Indian forces of carrying out “provocative attacks” on its troops. It did not say if any of its soldiers died.

As the countries around the region grapple with the coronavirus pandemic, China has been asserting its territorial claims and influence across the region, notably toward Hong Kong and Taiwan and in the South China Sea.

In South Asia, the sides have been engaged in a “very complex dance” along the line of actual control since early May, said Jeff M. Smith, a research fellow in Heritage’s Asian Studies Center.

That has fanned anti-Chinese sentiments already running high due to Beijing’s opposition to India’s decision in August to revoke the statehood and semi-autonomy of Kashmir, parts of which are claimed by both Pakistan and China, and split it into two territories governed by New Delhi.

Tussles for power between China and India, the first and second-most populous nations, date back centuries, though the two have sought to keep political, economic and security ties and avoid outright bloodshed.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese leader Xi Jinping have met more than a dozen times for talks, most recently in October in India, to smooth relations and build up trade. But India’s unilateral decision in August to split Kashmir rankled Beijing.

“I think what is interesting is how quickly Sino-Indian relations have deteriorated,” said Joe Fewsmith, a China politics expert at Boston University. “A few years ago, Xi Jinping expressed hope that China and India could build cooperative relations. (That’s) not likely now.”

The pandemic’s origins in the central Chinese city of Wuhan are another factor: with more than 354,000 coronavirus cases and 11,903 deaths India is now the fourth worst affected country in the world.

But the bigger cause for antagonism lies in the Himalayas: a region China has always considered a strategically vital corridor between its restive Muslim Xinjiang region and Tibet.

At the United Nations General Assembly, China has supported Pakistan’s opposition to India’s decision to split Kashmir into the union territories of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh.

The U.S. backed India’s assertion of its sovereign right to make such changes within its borders. While troops brawled in eastern Ladakh region in May, President Donald Trump offered to mediate.

The Trump administration has withdrawn U.S. support from Pakistan in favor of India, which it sees as a bulwark against China’s growing influence. After two high-profile meetings between Modi and Trump – including rallies in Houston, Texas, and Gujarat, Modi’s home state – India agreed to purchase $15 billion in American arms.

The U.S. and India have balked at China’s multi-billion-dollar Belt and Road Initiative, a string of infrastructure and finance development projects stretched from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean.

In response to the pandemic, a movement has emerged to build up India as an alternative to China for Western markets and to boycott Chinese goods.

Chris Biggers, a former government satellite imagery analyst, said Monday’s clash fits a pattern of Chinese “intimidation” along the border. In 2017, similar low-scale hostilities along the tri-border area of Doklam broke out as China pushed into disputed territory, bringing in troops, building roads, expanding airbases, and flying drones and jets.

Yet, the forces amassed at Galwan dwarf what was seen at Doklam.

“I’ve never seen anything, outside of a military exercise, of this kind of mobilization of force, particularly between India and China,” Biggers said.

A further escalation shouldn’t be ruled out, said Pravin Sawhney, a military expert and editor of FORCE, a monthly magazine focused on national security.

“They (China) are fully prepared for it. Their belligerence is quite open not only on the border but in the South China Sea, too. On the other hand, India’s response has been very subdued and defensive in nature. There is no immediate threat of an all-out war with China but India should be concerned about an exit strategy and I fear they have none,” he said.

Associated Press writer Sheikh Saaliq and reporters in Beijing contributed to this report.

Indian capital’s crematoriums overwhelmed with virus dead

Indian capital’s crematoriums overwhelmed with virus dead

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

U.S. seeks role as China, India face off at border

Quiz: Name the famous inventors of these revolutionary products

Rod Rosenstein says he was led to believe the Carter Page FISA applications were accurate

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Antifa planned anti-government insurgency for months, law enforcement official says

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Charles Hurt

Trump and the riot of political plagues

Scott Walker

Black lives matter: Reform law enforcement but also defund Planned Parenthood

Ralph Z. Hallow

All the nonsense that fits, The New York Times prints

View all

Question of the Day

Should Confederate names be taken off U.S. military bases?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

People wait by the burning pyre of a relative who died of COVID-19, at a crematorium in New Delhi, India, Friday, June 5, 2020. The coronavirus pandemic is leaving India’s morgues piling up with the dead and graveyards and crematoriums … more >

Print

By Sheikh Saaliq

Associated Press

Friday, June 12, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) — When Raj Singh’s 70-year-old mother died from the coronavirus in India’s capital, he took comfort in the prospect of a proper cremation, the funeral rite that Hindus believe releases the soul from the cycle of rebirth.

But instead of chanting sacred Vedic hymns and sprinkling holy water from the Ganges River, all Singh could do was place his mother’s wrapped corpse on a wooden pyre and along with a handful of relatives watch it burn.

“I never thought I would watch my mother go like this,” he said.

TOP STORIES

Biden: 'Dr. King's assassination did not have the worldwide impact that George Floyd's death did'

Four St. Louis police officers charged with beating undercover colleague

Nancy Pelosi is adamant: Statues honoring Confederates in the Capitol have got to go

Like elsewhere in the world, the novel coronavirus has made honoring the dead in New Delhi a hurried affair, largely devoid of the rituals that give it meaning for mourners. Cemeteries and crematoriums are overwhelmed, so there isn’t much time for ceremony, and even if there were, the government limits the number of people allowed at funerals and those in attendance must maintain distance and wear masks.

“The whole grieving process has been interrupted,” said Pappu, who goes by only one name and lights the funeral pyres at Nigambodh Ghat, New Delhi’s biggest crematorium.

New Delhi has officially reported close to 1,100 deaths from the coronavirus, but cemeteries and crematoriums in the city say the actual number is several hundred higher. Hospital morgues are beyond capacity, and with summer temperatures reaching 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Farenheit) some bodies are being kept on thick ice slabs.

“In the beginning, I used to carry only one body. Now, helpers at the morgue will stack as many bodies as they can fit in my van,” said Bhijendra Dhigya, who drives a hearse from one New Delhi hospital to the crematorium.

The spike in deaths in New Delhi comes amid a broader virus surge throughout India, where authorities are reporting some 10,000 new infections each day and more than 300 deaths. Nevertheless, India lifted most of the remaining restrictions from its 10-week lockdown on June 8, the same day it recorded what at the time was its highest single-day death toll from the virus.

On Friday, India’s nationwide caseload overtook Britain to became the fourth highest in the world with 297,535 confirmed cases and 8,498 deaths, according to the Health Ministry. But that is just the known cases. Like elsewhere in the world, the actual number of infections is thought to be far higher for a number of reasons including limited testing.

New Delhi’s health centers are under immense strain and the state government’s deputy chief minister, Manish Sisodia, said this week that a state health department model has projected a worst case scenario in which the number of infections in the capital – already at nearly 35,000 – could reach 550,000 by the end of July.

In the worst case scenario, Sisodia said New Delhi would need 80,000 hospital beds, far more than the roughly 9,000 hospital beds currently available for virus patients. The state government is considering taking hotels and sports stadiums to use as field hospitals.

The capital’s Nigambodh Ghat crematorium has handled more than 500 coronavirus cremations since the beginning of the outbreak. When some of its gas-fueled incinerators broke down, there was no one willing to repair them, so the staff reverted to traditional wooden pyres.

Even with working hours extended, there has been no time for individual cremation ceremonies and exhaustive rituals with incense, garlands of marigold and chanting.

The crematorium is now largely quiet except for the distinct snap and crackle of the burning wood and the din of sirens from ambulances bringing more bodies.

The virus has upended Muslim burial rituals in the city as well.

Islamic burials normally involve a simple ceremony. Before the body is laid to rest, it is washed. Those attending the funeral are allowed to have a look at the face of the dead and a prayer is performed, followed by a sermon from a cleric. Then close family members help place the body in a grave.

Now bodies arrive at New Delhi’s largest Muslim cemetery in hearses manned by crews in hazmat suits. Bodies aren’t washed and mourners can’t view them. There are no sermons.

The cemetery has already seen more than 200 burials of COVID-19 victims and with bodies steadily arriving, the grounds are filling fast.

On a recent day at the burial of a 22-year-old man who died of the virus, a backhoe dug a grave as four relatives said a speedy prayer. The body was then lowered into the grave by ropes.

Mohammad Shameem, a gravedigger who now oversees the burials, shook his head in disapproval as the backhoe quickly carved out another grave.

“That’s not how burials should happen,” he said.

Asia Today: New Delhi reverses limits on testing, sickbeds

Asia Today: New Delhi reverses limits on testing, sickbeds

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

U.S. seeks role as China, India face off at border

Quiz: Name the famous inventors of these revolutionary products

Rod Rosenstein says he was led to believe the Carter Page FISA applications were accurate

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Antifa planned anti-government insurgency for months, law enforcement official says

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Charles Hurt

Trump versus all the crazed liberal lies

Cal Thomas

Trump and Republicans must deliver a ‘contract with black America’

Cheryl K. Chumley

God’s winnowing of America

View all

Question of the Day

Was Gen. Mattis right to speak out about Trump's leadership?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

A man wearing a mask has a haircut with a barber wearing a protective suit to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus as people practicing social distancing are reflected on a window in Manila, Philippines on Monday, June 8, … more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Monday, June 8, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) – New Delhi has reversed orders that limited the scope of coronavirus testing and reserved hospital beds for city residents as the Indian capital’s caseload continues to surge.

Delhi’s numbers of infected jumped to 29,943 on Tuesday of India’s 266,598 total cases nationwide.

Since coming to power in 2013, the government led by chief minister Arvind Kejriwal has prioritized investing in health care. Delhi has the best health care in India, drawing patients from across the country.

TOP STORIES

Abraham Lincoln monument torched in Chicago: 'An absolute disgraceful act'

McConnell looking to 'respond to the obvious racial discrimination' country has witnessed recently

Report: Chad Daybell arrested after human remains found at home

But as lockdown restrictions have eased in recent weeks, the number of people infected with the coronavirus has soared in the capital. On Sunday, Kejriwal announced that hospital beds for COVID-19 patients would be reserved for Delhi residents and testing limited to those with symptoms of the disease.

But the central government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi strongly objected to the rules, and late Monday the Delhi government set them aside, with Kejriwal tweeting that “making arrangements for treatment for people from across the country during the Covid-19 pandemic is a major challenge. But maybe it’s God’s will that we have to serve everyone in the country.”

In other developments in the Asia-Pacific region:

– MAGSAYSAY AWARDS CANCELED: The Ramon Magsaysay awards have been canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic, marking only the third disruption in six decades for the annual prize regarded as an Asian Nobel. The Philippine foundation that hands out the awards said it has no choice “with the COVID-19 pandemic practically immobilizing the world.” Last year’s recipients included a South Korean who helped fight suicide and bullying; a Thai human rights defender; journalists from India and Myanmar; and a musician credited with helping to shape modern Philippine musical culture. The Philippines has about 22,400 coronavirus cases, including more than 1,000 deaths.

– SPECTATORS FOR AUSSIE FOOTBALL: South Australia state will allow 2,000 fans to attend an Australian rules football match on Saturday but won’t allow a Black Lives Matter rally on the same day. South Australia is the first state or territory to allow a crowd to return to professional sport. Police Commissioner Grant Stevens said spectators will be allowed at a match between Port Adelaide and the Adelaide Crows. But they wouldn’t grant a second exemption from social distancing rules for a protest against the death of George Floyd. Stevens said the rally last week had been allowed due to unique circumstances. “To continually allow people to disregard the restrictions we have in place would make a mockery of the good efforts of everybody else who are doing their best to abide by those restrictions,” Stevens added.

– US TO REOPEN WUHAN CONSULATE: The U.S. State Department has notified Congress that it plans to re-open the U.S. consulate in Wuhan, China, later this month as relations between the two countries continue to deteriorate over the coronavirus pandemic, human rights, trade and China’s policies in Hong Kong. The consulate had been shut in late January due to the virus outbreak that is believed to have originated in Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province. The consulate was one of only two U.S. diplomatic posts — the other was the consulate in Vladivostok, Russia — to completely suspend operations for virus-related reasons, although all U.S. missions severely curtailed their services. The State Department said it intends to open the Wuhan consulate “on or about June 22” but that the date could slip depending on local conditions. “At this critical juncture in U.S.-China relations, it is critical that our diplomatic posts in China are staffed,” said the notice, a copy of which was obtained by The Associated Press. “At the current time, conditions in China generally, and Hubei province specifically, have improved to such a degree that resuming operations in Wuhan is appropriate,” it said.

– SOUTH KOREA CASES GROW: South Korea has reported 38 new cases of COVID-19 and one more death, bringing national totals to 11,852 infections and 274 virus-related fatalities. Figures from South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday showed 35 of the new cases came from the Seoul metropolitan area, where officials have struggled to trace transmissions linked to entertainment venues, church gatherings and low-income workers who couldn’t afford to stay home. At least 1,300 infections have been linked to international arrivals, with around 90% of them being South Koreans who returned home as the virus spread.

– NEPAL PROTEST: Police in riot gear fired a water cannon and beat protesters demonstrating over the government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic. About 200 protesters gathered on a road leading to the prime minister’s official residence with signs demanding more virus testing. The government has been criticized for limited testing, inadequate quarantine facilities and limited aid to poor people affected by the country’s lockdown. The business community has been pressuring the government to ease restrictions despite the rising number of virus cases. Nepal has reported 3,762 confirmed cases and 14 deaths.

– INDONESIA CASES RISE: Indonesia reported a daily increase in coronavirus cases of more than 1,000 for the first time Tuesday as its total confirmed cases reached 33,076. Health Ministry official Achmad Yurianto said there were 1,043 new cases and 40 more deaths, taking the death toll to 1,923, the highest in Southeast Asia. New cases have been spiking as the government gradually allows businesses to resume operations amid growing economic pressures in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.

India, China decide to continue efforts to defuse border row

India, China decide to continue efforts to defuse border row

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

How the liberal media and ‘Looting Party’ cultivates racism and hate in America

Cheryl K. Chumley

Democrats know their time grows short

Michael McKenna

Outdoors Act puts taxpayers on the hook for federal land-buying spree

View all

Question of the Day

Was Gen. Mattis right to speak out about Trump's leadership?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

In this July 22, 2011 file photo, people stand by the banks of the Pangong Lake, near the India-China border in Ladakh, India.Indian officials say Indian and Chinese soldiers are in a bitter standoff in the remote and picturesque Ladakh … more >

Print

By ASHOK SHARMA

Associated Press

Sunday, June 7, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) – India and China will press ahead with military and diplomatic engagements in a bid to resolve a standoff along their disputed Himalayan frontier, the foreign ministry in New Delhi said Sunday.

The External Affairs Ministry said in statement that a meeting between Indian and Chinese military commanders at a border post in the Himalayan region on Saturday took place in a “cordial and positive atmosphere.”

“Both sides agreed to peacefully resolve the situation in the border areas in accordance with various bilateral agreements and keeping in view the agreement between the leaders that peace and tranquility in the IndiaChina border regions is essential for the overall development of bilateral relations,” the statement said.

TOP STORIES

Speedway declares race a 'protest' to skirt coronavirus rules, draws 2,000

Suspect in deputy's ambush killing is active-duty Air Force sergeant

Bill de Blasio flips, now vows to defund New York police

There was no immediate reaction from Beijing.

Indian officials say the standoff began in early May when large contingents of Chinese soldiers entered deep inside Indian-controlled territory at three places in Ladakh, erecting tents and posts. They said the Chinese soldiers ignored repeated verbal warnings to leave, triggering shouting matches, stone-throwing and fistfights.

India also mobilized thousands of soldiers.

China has sought to downplay the confrontation while saying the two sides were communicating through both their front-line military units and their respective embassies to resolve the issue.

The ChinaIndia border dispute covers nearly 3,500 kilometers (2,175 miles) of frontier that the two countries call the Line of Actual Control. They fought a bitter war in 1962 that spilled into Ladakh.

The two sides have been trying since the early 1990s to settle their dispute without success.

India, China military commanders meet on frontier dispute

India, China military commanders meet on frontier dispute

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

How the liberal media and ‘Looting Party’ cultivates racism and hate in America

Cheryl K. Chumley

Democrats know their time grows short

Michael McKenna

Outdoors Act puts taxpayers on the hook for federal land-buying spree

View all

Question of the Day

Was Gen. Mattis right to speak out about Trump's leadership?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

This combination of two satellite photos of the Ngari Günsa civil-military airport base taken on April 1, left, and May 17, 2020, near the border with India in far western region of Tibet in China show development around the airport. … more >

Print

By AIJAZ HUSSAIN

Associated Press

Saturday, June 6, 2020

SRINAGAR, India (AP) – Indian and Chinese military commanders met Saturday to try to resolve a bitter standoff along their disputed frontier high in the Himalayas where thousands of troops on both sides are facing off.

The meeting at a border post was attended by senior commanders and was the highest-level encounter so far. Local border commanders held a series of meetings in the past month but failed to break the impasse.

On Friday, Indian and Chinese foreign ministry officials discussed the border tensions.

TOP STORIES

Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history

Speedway declares race a 'protest' to skirt coronavirus rules, draws 2,000

MSNBC seeks $333k after defeating defamation suit filed over reporting of pro-Trump network OAN

There were no immediate details available on Saturday’s meeting. Both India and China have provided little official information on the standoff, but media in the two countries have closely covered the escalating tensions.

Indian officials say the standoff began in early May when large contingents of Chinese soldiers entered deep inside Indian-controlled territory at three places in Ladakh, erecting tents and posts. They said the Chinese soldiers ignored repeated verbal warnings to leave, triggering shouting matches, stone-throwing and fistfights.

India also mobilized thousands of soldiers.

Chinese and Indian soldiers also faced off along the frontier in India’s northeastern Sikkim state in early May.

China has sought to downplay the confrontation while saying the two sides were communicating through both their front-line military units and their respective embassies to resolve issues.

Experts in India cautioned that there was little expectation of any immediate resolution in the military meeting. In the past, most disputes between China and India have been resolved quickly through such meetings, although some required diplomatic intervention.

Lt. Gen. D.S. Hooda, who retired as head of the Indian military’s Northern Command, under which Kashmir and Ladakh fall, said the negotiations are going to be “long and hard.”

“There won’t be much headway at military-level talks in terms of resolving the issue. But the military-level talks will help deescalate tensions on the ground and set a stage for diplomatic negotiations,” Hooda said.

Though skirmishes aren’t new along their long-disputed frontier, the standoff at Ladakh’s Galwan Valley, where India is building a strategic road connecting the region to an airstrip close to China, has escalated in recent weeks.

The Chinese “ingress into the Galwan River valley opens up a new and worrying chapter,” Ajai Shukla, a former Indian military officer and a defense commentator, wrote on his website.

India unilaterally declared Ladakh a federal territory while separating it from disputed Kashmir in August 2019. China was among the handful of countries to strongly condemn the move, raising it at international forums including the U.N. Security Council.

The ChinaIndia border dispute covers nearly 3,500 kilometers (2,175 miles) of frontier that the two countries call the Line of Actual Control. They fought a bitter war in 1962 that spilled into Ladakh. The two sides have been trying since the early 1990s to settle their dispute without success.

The most serious dispute is over China’s claims that India’s northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh is part of Tibet, which India rejects.

China claims about 90,000 square kilometers (35,000 square miles) of territory in India’s northeast, while India says China occupies 38,000 square kilometers (15,000 square miles) of its territory in the Aksai Chin Plateau in the Himalayas, a contiguous part of the Ladakh region.

Hooda said the level of physical violence in the current standoff is “unprecedented and different from the past.”

“The tensest of standoffs between soldiers of the two sides in the past have been marked by a remarkable degree of restraint and an understanding of not using force,” he said. “If this restraint breaks down, each transgression could become a flash point.”

India, China trying to end army standoff in Himalayas

India, China trying to end army standoff in Himalayas

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Outdoors Act puts taxpayers on the hook for federal land-buying spree

Everett Piper

‘Race is a lie. Stop believing it’

Charles Hurt

A tale of two riots reveals double standard

View all

Question of the Day

Was Gen. Mattis right to speak out about Trump's leadership?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Print

By ASHOK SHARMA

Associated Press

Friday, June 5, 2020

NEW DELHI (AP) – Indian and Chinese foreign ministry officials on Friday discussed the flaring of tensions on their disputed Himalayan border, where thousands of soldiers from the two countries have been facing off just a few hundred meters (yards) from each other for a month, an Indian official said.

The video conference came a day before generals in the Ladakh region are scheduled to meet at a border post to intensify efforts for a pullback to their pre-May positions in the region. The army officers have held a series of meetings in the past four weeks to break the impasse.

An External Affairs Ministry statement in New Delhi said both sides agreed that they should handle their differences through peaceful discussion “bearing in mind the importance of respecting each other’s sensitivities, concerns and aspirations and not allow them to become disputes.”

TOP STORIES

Lincoln Memorial, WWII Memorial defaced by vandals in rioting

D.C. Black Lives Matter protests draw thousands

Trump retweets video of conservative activist saying George Floyd was 'not a good person'

Indian officials say Chinese soldiers entered the Indian-controlled territory of Ladakh in early May at three different points, erecting tents and guard posts.

They said the Chinese soldiers ignored repeated verbal warnings to leave, triggering shouting matches, stone-throwing and fistfights.

China has sought to downplay the confrontation while providing little information. Indian media reports say that the two armies have moved artillery guns in the region.

China has objected to India building a road through a valley connecting the region to an airstrip, possibly sparking its move to assert control over territory along the border that is not clearly defined in places.

India and China fought a border war in 1962 and have been trying since the early 1990’s to settle their dispute without success.

In all, China claims some 90,000 square kilometers (35,000 square miles) of territory in India’s northeast, including the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh with its traditionally Buddhist population. India says China occupies 38,000 square kilometers (15,000 square miles) of its territory in the Aksai Chin Plateau in the western Himalayas, including part of the Ladakh region.

UK vaccine summit calls for freely available virus vaccine

UK vaccine summit calls for freely available virus vaccine

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Brad Parscale

Presidential race contrasts Trump’s success versus Biden’s chronic failure

Daniel N. Hoffman

Iraq’s promising new leader deserves our support

Michael McKenna

Polling shows Trump’s window for reelection is closing

View all

Question of the Day

Was Gen. Mattis right to speak out about Trump's leadership?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Community activist Kunal Kanase, 31, stands for a picture in a lane of Dharavi, one of Asia’s largest slums, in Mumbai, India, Saturday, May 16, 2020. Kanase is among many unsung heroes working to protect some of India’s most vulnerable … more >

Print

By MARIA CHENG and LAURAN NEERGAARD

Associated Press

Thursday, June 4, 2020

LONDON (AP) – A vaccine summit hosted by Britain on Thursday raised billions of dollars to immunize children in developing countries as experts wrestled with the difficult question of how any potential vaccine against the new coronavirus might be distributed globally – and fairly.

The United Nations and the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement have urged that “a people’s vaccine” be developed for COVID-19 that would be freely available to everyone, calling it a “moral imperative.”

Thursday’s event raised $8.8 billion, exceeding its target, for the vaccines alliance GAVI, which says the funds will be used to vaccinate about 300 million children in dozens of countries against diseases like malaria, pneumonia and HPV.

TOP STORIES

'Practice an eye-gouge': Project Veritas infiltrates Antifa's undercover training

Presidential race contrasts Trump's success versus Biden's chronic failure

Portland, Oregon: No more school resource officers after George Floyd death

GAVI also announced a new “advance market commitment” mechanism to enable developing countries to get any effective COVID-19 vaccine when available. It hopes to raise an additional $2 billion for that effort, to immunize health care workers as well as high-risk individuals and create a buffer of doses to be used where needed most.

But experts pointed out that the unprecedented pandemic – where arguably every country will be clamoring for a vaccine – may make efforts at fair distribution extremely messy.

The worldwide scramble for masks and ventilators that erupted in the early stages of the outbreak – where France took over the country’s mask stocks so they could be given to first responders and others inside the country and the U.S. apparently paid off shippers to redirect ventilators to the U.S. – are not encouraging signs that there will be much global cooperation if and when a coronavirus vaccine is available.

“Rich countries will most likely try to push their way to the front of the queue, leaving poorer countries at the back, and that’s a problem,” said Jimmy Whitworth, a professor of international public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

“I can’t imagine any country saying, ‘Africa’s need is greater than ours, so they can get the vaccine first and we’ll remain vulnerable.’”

The urgency of finding a way to stem outbreaks was evident as the worldwide total of reported virus cases reached 130,398 on Wednesday, the highest one-day total so far in the pandemic, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

Brazil reported yet another record number of deaths – 1,349 – bringing Brazil’s confirmed death toll to more than 32,500, the world’s fourth-highest and considered by experts a significant under count due to insufficient testing.

India reported a record number of infections – 9,304, with 260 deaths – as its tally of fatalities surpassed 6,000 and its number of infections rose to nearly 217,000, the world’s seventh-highest. Neighboring Pakistan reported over 4,000 new cases as its confirmed infections surpassed neighboring China – a spike that came weeks after Prime Minister Imran Khan overrode warnings from experts and eased a lockdown.

Ahead of the vaccine gathering, philanthropist Bill Gates said there were potential solutions to the growing tide of vaccine nationalism – exhibited when the CEO of Sanofi suggested the U.S. had a right to the first doses of any vaccine because of its significant investment.

“The key to that challenge is having scale and having factories all over the world that are making the vaccines,” including multiple factories in Asia, the Americas and Europe, Gates said.

Gates acknowledged there could be some benefit to countries that funded vital vaccine research but called for a “system of allocating doses to those most at risk, and making sure that even the countries that can’t compete financially for that access, that they’re considered – their health workers, their elderly.”

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he hoped Thursday’s gathering would mark “the moment when the world comes together to unite humanity in the fight against disease.”

But Michael Head, a senior research fellow in global health at the University of Southampton, noted that in the past such sentiments have not always been backed by action. “In reality, that can be turned on its head in the weeks and months ahead,” he said.

About a dozen vaccine candidates are in early stages of testing in thousands of people around the world. There are no guarantees any will work but there’s increasing hope that at least some could be ready by the end of the year. Oxford University is beginning an advanced study involving 10,000 volunteers; the U.S. is preparing for even larger studies in July that involve 30,000 people each testing different candidates, including Oxford’s and one made by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc.

Vaccine developers are worried about whether the virus spread is slowing enough in the U.S. and Europe that it will be hard to prove if their candidates really work. So later this month, the Oxford vaccine will be tested on 2,000 Brazilian volunteers in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, according to the U.K. ambassador to Brazil, Vijay Rangarajan. The U.S. government also is considering test sites in other countries.

While Oxford scientists say they are committed to making their shot available to all who need it at a fair price, academic Whitworth noted “that doesn’t square with the rhetoric coming from British ministers funding it, saying U.K. citizens will be at the front of the queue.”

And the U.S. has signed a contract with AstraZeneca, which makes the Oxford vaccine, for 300 million doses.

Vaccine makers know they’ll be judged if rich countries buy up all their supply. Thursday, AstraZeneca said it would provide 300 million doses of the Oxford vaccine to GAVI’s new financing mechanism to try to ensure equitable access. The doses will be provided when the vaccine is licensed or pre-qualified by the World Health Organization.

“I’m thinking very carefully what would be the best way to make sure that everybody will get a fair share of the supplies that exist as quickly as possible and that in this fairness we will not forget the unprivileged countries,” said Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla. “From the human perspective they have equal rights.”

In the U.S., where a wave of protests is adding to concerns over possible additional outbreaks, new cases have been surging just weeks after many businesses were allowed to reopen. On Thursday, Vegas casinos and Universal Orlando were among those welcoming visitors.

As of Thursday, more than 6.5 million people worldwide have been confirmed infected with the coronavirus and more than 386,000 have died, according to the Johns Hopkins University count. The actual number of infections is thought to be much higher, due to limits on testing and many asymptomatic cases.

___

Neergaard contributed to this report from Alexandria, Virginia. Associated Press reporters around the world also contributed.

Kremlin: Trump tells Putin about idea for summit with Russia

Kremlin: Trump tells Putin about idea for summit with Russia

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cal Thomas

Discrimination and racism have scarred America since slavery

Michael McKenna

Nancy Pelosi’s proxy voting designed to dilute power of rank-and-file lawmakers

Ralph Z. Hallow

What happens when you apologize to rioters?

View all

Question of the Day

Should police do more to curtail rioting?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Russian President Vladimir Putin, attends a meeting via teleconference at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia, Monday, June 1, 2020. Putin set a nationwide vote on constitutional amendments allowing him to extend his rule for July 1. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, … more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Monday, June 1, 2020

MOSCOW (AP) – U.S. President Donald Trump called Russian President Vladimir Putin Monday to tell him about his proposal to convene an international summit that would involve Russia, the Kremlin said.

Trump said Saturday he will postpone until the fall a meeting of the G7 leading industrialized nations that he had planned to hold next month, and plans to invite Russia, Australia, South Korea and India. Trump told reporters that he feels the current makeup of the group is “very outdated” and doesn’t properly represent “what’s going on in the world.”

The G7 members are Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States. Russia had been included in the gathering of the world’s most advanced economies since 1997, but was suspended in 2014 following its invasion of Ukraine and annexation of Crimea.

TOP STORIES

Chattanooga police chief tells officers OK with George Floyd death to turn in badges

Autopsy by family-hired doctors finds George Floyd was suffocated by police

Celebrities blasted for donating to protester bail fund as rioting, violence escalate

The Kremlin said Monday that Trump told Putin about his idea, but it didn’t offer any details of the discussion or say whether the Russian leader accepted the invitation.

The White House confirmed the call, saying Trump and Putin “discussed the latest efforts to defeat the coronavirus pandemic and reopen global economies.”

“President Trump also reiterated the need for effective arms control,” the White House said, and added: “Additionally, the two leaders discussed progress toward convening the G7.”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Monday Russia will not be included in the G7, disagreeing with Trump. Trudeau noted Russia’s “continued disrespect and flaunting of international rules and norms.”

The Kremlin also said that Putin thanked Trump for a batch of U.S. ventilators sent to Russia and the two leaders talked about steps their countries have taken to combat the outbreak.

The Russian president also congratulated Trump on Saturday’s launch of two U.S. astronauts aboard the Dragon spacecraft built by Elon Musk’s SpaceX company, the Kremlin readout said. The launch put the United States back in the business of sending astronauts into orbit from home soil for the first time in nearly a decade – during which time it relied on Russian spacecraft to deliver its astronauts to the International Space Station.

The Kremlin said that Putin and Trump spoke of the development of mutually beneficial cooperation in space and also talked about the need to intensify a U.S.-Russian dialogue on strategic stability and steps to enhance mutual trust in the military sphere.

Moon Jae-in says he is open to joining G-7 summit

South Korea’s Moon Jae-in says he is open to joining G-7 summit

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cal Thomas

Discrimination and racism have scarred America since slavery

Michael McKenna

Nancy Pelosi’s proxy voting designed to dilute power of rank-and-file lawmakers

Ralph Z. Hallow

What happens when you apologize to rioters?

View all

Question of the Day

Will you rush to eat at restaurants when they re-open?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

South Korean President Moon Jae-in speaks on the occasion of the third anniversary of inauguration at the presidential Blue House Sunday, May 10, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Moon urged citizens not to lower their guard down, but said there’s … more >

Print

By Lauren Meier

The Washington Times

Monday, June 1, 2020

South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Monday said he would be open to participating in the Group of Seven nations summit after President Trump suggested that South Korea, Russia, India and Australia join the pact.

Mr. Trump on Saturday described his new proposal as the “G-10 or G-11” and said he’s “roughly” broached the idea with the leaders of the four countries he’d like to add.

White House strategic communications director Alyssa Farah said the proposal is intended to bring together traditional U.S. allies to talk about how to deal with the future of China. The administration is increasingly clashing with China over issues such as the coronavirus and Hong Kong.

TOP STORIES

Antifa: End 'whiteness' as a race, stop funding police departments

Fallout from George Floyd death, protests reverberate across country

Asphyxiation not the cause of George Floyd's death: Autopsy

“If at an appropriate time, a meeting can take place successfully, it will be a signal that the world is returning to normal conditions and economy,” Mr. Moon said in a statement obtained by Reuters. Mr. Moon and Mr. Trump spoke over the phone on Monday.

Mr. Trump over the weekend announced he is postponing the annual gathering of the leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy and the U.S. to at least September.

“I’m postponing it because I don’t feel as a G-7 it probably represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries,” Mr. Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One. “We want Australia, we want India, we want South Korea. That’s a nice group of countries right there.”

Justin Trudeau, Canadian PM, says Russia should not rejoin G-7

Canadian PM Justin Trudeau says Russia should not rejoin G-7

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cal Thomas

Discrimination and racism have scarred America since slavery

Michael McKenna

Nancy Pelosi’s proxy voting designed to dilute power of rank-and-file lawmakers

Ralph Z. Hallow

What happens when you apologize to rioters?

View all

Question of the Day

Will you rush to eat at restaurants when they re-open?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during his daily press conference on the COVID-19 pandemic outside of his residence at Rideau Cottage in Ottawa, Ontario, on Friday, April 10, 2020. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press via AP) ** FILE ** more >

Print

By Lauren Meier

The Washington Times

Monday, June 1, 2020

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Monday that Russia should not rejoin the Group of Seven nations summit after President Trump suggested its return, along with India, South Korea and Australia.

Mr. Trump on Saturday described his new proposal as the “G-10 or G-11” and said he’s “roughly” broached the idea with the leaders of the four countries he’d like to add.

The president has suggested that Russia return to the group in the past after being removed from what was known as the G-8 in 2014 amid Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in Ukraine’s Black Sea peninsula.

SEE ALSO: Putin supports ‘dialogue’ of return to G-7 but lacks information following Trump proposal

The G-7 has since been comprised of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy and the U.S.

Russia was excluded from the G-7 after it invaded Crimea a number of years ago,” Mr. Trudeau said during a news conference, “and its continued disrespect and flaunting of international rules and norms is why it remains outside of the G-7, and it will continue to remain out.”

Earlier Monday, a spokesperson for the Kremlin said Russian President Vladimir Putin “is a supporter of dialogue in all directions, but in this case, in order to respond to such initiatives, we need to receive more information, which we, unfortunately, do not have.”

Putin supports ‘dialogue’ of return to G-7 but lacks information following Trump proposal

Putin supports ‘dialogue’ of return to G-7 but lacks information following Trump proposal

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Retribution’: Chinese state media calls violent U.S. protests a ‘beautiful sight’

Trump’s pending immigration decision divides small business, crackdown supporters

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Romanian, Polish military medical teams help U.S. with coronavirus

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cal Thomas

Discrimination and racism have scarred America since slavery

Michael McKenna

Nancy Pelosi’s proxy voting designed to dilute power of rank-and-file lawmakers

Ralph Z. Hallow

What happens when you apologize to rioters?

View all

Question of the Day

Should police do more to curtail rioting?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Russian President Vladimir Putin, attends a meeting via teleconference at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia, Monday, June 1, 2020. Putin set a nationwide vote on constitutional amendments allowing him to extend his rule for July 1. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, … more >

Print

By Lauren Meier

The Washington Times

Monday, June 1, 2020

The Kremlin on Monday said it remains in the dark about President Trump’s plan to add Russia, India, South Korea and Australia to the Group of 7 nations summit, but supports “dialogue in all directions.”

Mr. Trump on Saturday described his new proposal as the “G-10 or G-11” and said he’s “roughly” broached the idea with the leaders of the four countries he’d like to add.

“Maybe I’ll do it after the election,” he said, adding that he could also host the gathering around the time of the U.N. General Assembly in New York City in September — postponing the gathering that was expected next month.

SEE ALSO: Canadian PM Justin Trudeau says Russia should not rejoin G-7

“I’m postponing it because I don’t feel as a G-7 it probably represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries,” Mr. Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One. “We want Australia, we want India, we want South Korea. That’s a nice group of countries right there.”

The spokesperson for Russian President Vladimir Putin, Dmitry Peskov, said Monday that Mr. Putin “is a supporter of dialogue in all directions, but in this case, in order to respond to such initiatives, we need to receive more information, which we, unfortunately, do not have.”

Russia was removed from what was known as the G-8 in 2014 amid Moscow’s annexation of Crimea in Ukraine’s Black Sea peninsula.

The G-7 has since been comprised of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy and the U.S.

Following Mr. Trump’s announcement, Alyssa Farah, White House strategic communications director, said the proposal is bringing together traditional U.S. allies to talk about how to deal with the future of China. The administration is increasingly clashing with China over issues such as the coronavirus crisis and Hong Kong.

The president had been planning to host the G-7 summit at the White House in late June or partly at Camp David, amid discussions with other heads of state about how to handle the gathering during the coronavirus pandemic. He has previously expressed support of Russia’s return to the G-7.

DC mayor: We have to be concerned about virus rebound

DC mayor: We have to be concerned about virus rebound

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Mueller prosecutor held secret meetings targeting Paul Manafort before Russia probe: IG

Quiz: Are you a war movie expert?

‘A fair chance’: Veterans blocked from civilian jobs by patchwork of red tape

Quiz: Can you pass a pandemics, plagues and infectious diseases test?

Rebel Democrats in battleground states could be good sign for Trump

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Pelosi’s proxy voting designed to dilute power of rank-and-file lawmakers

Ralph Z. Hallow

What happens when you apologize to rioters?

Everett Piper

No politician has the right to dictate, contradict or contravene religious beliefs

View all

Question of the Day

Will you rush to eat at restaurants when they re-open?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Protesters and National Guardsmen face off on East Lake Street, Friday, May 29, 2020, in St. Paul, Minn. The massive protests sweeping across U.S. cities following the police killing of a black man in Minnesota have elevated fears of a … more >

Print

By KELLI KENNEDY and DANICA KIRKA and PABLO GORONDI

Associated Press

Sunday, May 31, 2020

MIAMI (AP) – Rosa Jimenez Cano felt compelled to attend a protest against police brutality to stand with fellow black Americans, then realized afterward how much the coronavirus complicated things.

“This can be kind of a tinderbox for COVID,” the 39-year-old venture capitalist said after attending a demonstration in Florida in response to the death of George Floyd by police in Minnesota.

As more beaches, churches, mosques, schools and businesses reopened worldwide, civil unrest in the United States over repeated racial injustice is raising fears of new virus outbreaks in a country that has more infections and deaths than anywhere else in the world. And it’s not just in the U.S. – London hosted a large anti-racism protest Sunday that certainly violated government social distancing rules.

TOP STORIES

Asphyxiation not the cause of George Floyd's death: Autopsy

Celebrities blasted for donating to protester bail fund as rioting, violence escalate

Van Jones: Forget the KKK, it's the 'white, liberal Hillary Clinton supporter' we should worry about

Rosa Jimenez Cano said she planned to self-quarantine for 14 days, worrying she was perhaps “irresponsible” in attending the protest Saturday night in Miami and exposing herself to “so many people.”

Protests over Floyd’s death have shaken the country from Minneapolis to New York, from Atlanta to Los Angeles. Some have turned into riots and clashes with police, leaving stores in flames and torched cars in the streets.

Floyd, a black man, died May 25 in Minneapolis saying “I can’t breathe” after a white police officer pressed a knee into his neck. It was the latest in a series of deaths of black men and women at the hands of police in America.

Health experts fear that silent carriers of the virus could unwittingly infect others at protests where people are packed cheek to jowl, many without masks, many chanting, singing or shouting. The virus is dispersed by microscopic droplets in the air when people cough, sneeze, sing or talk.

“There’s no question that, when you put hundreds or thousands of people together in close proximity, when we have got this virus all over the streets … it’s not healthy,” Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“Two weeks from now across America, we’re going to find out whether or not this gives us a spike and drives the numbers back up again or not.”

The U.S. has seen over 1.7 million infections and nearly 104,000 deaths in the pandemic, which has disproportionately affected racial minorities in a nation that does not have universal health care.

Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser said Sunday she was very concerned that the protests in the nation’s capital and elsewhere could provide fertile ground for a new series of outbreaks. Many of the protesters were wearing masks, but there were no attempts at social distancing.

“We’ve been working very hard in these last eight to 10 weeks to not have any mass gatherings,” she said. “As a nation, we have to be concerned about a rebound.”

Even the many protesters wearing masks are not guaranteed protection. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says cloth masks keep infected people from spreading the virus but are not designed to protect wearers from getting it.

Mass protests in connection with Floyd’s death were also being held in Europe.

In London, thousands of people marched Sunday chanting “No justice! No peace!” while carrying signs reading “Justice for George Floyd” and “Racism is a global issue.” Many demonstrators were not wearing masks and most in the crowd at Trafalgar Square were packed closely together. Britain has seen nearly 38,500 virus deaths, the second-highest in the world after the United States.

In Berlin, hundreds of protesters picketed outside the U.S. Embassy on Saturday night under the motto: “Justice for George Floyd.” Others marched near the U.S. embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Many Americans returned Sunday to in-person church services for the first time in weeks and tens of thousands of mosques reopened across the Middle East, but countries from India to Colombia still saw rising numbers of new infections.

Nearly 6.1 million infections have been reported worldwide, with nearly 370,000 people dying, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University. The true death toll is believed to be significantly higher, since many victims died of the virus without ever being tested.

The situation worsened Sunday in India, where new daily cases topped 8,000 for the first time and 193 more deaths were reported. Despite that, India still is easing restrictions on shops and public transport in more states beginning Monday, although subways and schools will remain closed.

In Saudi Arabia, mosques reopened Sunday for the first time in more than two months, but Islam’s holiest site in Mecca remained closed. In Jerusalem, throngs of worshippers waited outside the Al-Aqsa Mosque before it reopened. Many wore surgical masks and waited for temperature checks as they entered.

In Bogota, the capital of Colombia, authorities were locking down an area of nearly 1.5 million people as cases continued to rise. Mayor Claudia Lopez said no one in the working-class Kennedy area – inaugurated by the late U.S. President John F. Kennedy in 1961 – will be allowed out, except to seek food or medical care or in case of an emergency. Factories must also close.

In Spain, Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez said Sunday that he would ask Parliament for a final two-week extension of the nation’s state of emergency that is set to expire on June 7. That allows the government to keep ordering lockdown measures to control its coronavirus outbreak, which has claimed at least 27,000 lives, many of them in overwhelmed nursing homes.

“We have almost reached safe harbor,” Sánchez said.

At the Vatican, Pope Francis cautioned people against being pessimistic as they emerge from coronavirus lockdowns.

During Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica to mark Pentecost Sunday, Francis noted a tendency to say that “nothing will return as before.” That kind of thinking, Francis said, guarantees that “the one thing that certainly does not return is hope.”

___

Kirka reported from London and Gorondi reported from Budapest. AP reporters from around the world contributed to this report.

___

Follow AP pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Trump postponing G-7 summit, wants to add Russia, India, South Korea and Australia

Trump postpones G-7, says he hopes to add Russia, India, Australia and South Korea to summit

White House spokeswoman says president has in mind more effectively countering China

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Mueller prosecutor held secret meetings targeting Paul Manafort before Russia probe: IG

Quiz: Are you a war movie expert?

‘A fair chance’: Veterans blocked from civilian jobs by patchwork of red tape

Quiz: Can you pass a pandemics, plagues and infectious diseases test?

Rebel Democrats in battleground states could be good sign for Trump

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Pelosi’s proxy voting designed to dilute power of rank-and-file lawmakers

Ralph Z. Hallow

What happens when you apologize to rioters?

Everett Piper

No politician has the right to dictate, contradict or contravene religious beliefs

View all

Question of the Day

Will you rush to eat at restaurants when they re-open?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

President Donald Trump speaks with members of the press on the South Lawn of the White House, Saturday, May 30, 2020, in Washington, before boarding Marine One for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump is en … more >

Print

By Dave Boyer

The Washington Times

Saturday, May 30, 2020

President Trump said Saturday night that he’s trying to add Russia, India, South Korea and Australia to the Group of 7 nations summit and will postpone the meeting until at least September.

“I’m postponing it because I don’t feel as a G-7 it probably represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries,” Mr. Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One. “We want Australia, we want India, we want South Korea. That’s a nice group of countries right there.”

White House strategic communications director Alyssa Farah said the proposal is bringing together traditional U.S. allies to talk about how to deal with the future of China. The administration is increasingly clashing with China over issues such as the coronavirus and Hong Kong.

TOP STORIES

Celebrities blasted for donating to protester bail fund as rioting, violence escalate

Pelosi won't 'take the bait' on riots: 'I kind of ignore what President Trump says'

Officer Derek Chauvin's wife 'harassed and threatened' over false claim, divorce lawyer says

The president had been planning to host the G-7 summit at the White House in late June, or partly at Camp David, amid discussions with other heads of state about how to handle the gathering during the coronavirus pandemic.

Mr. Trump later described his new proposal as the “G-10 or G-11” said he’s “roughly” broached the idea with the leaders of the four countries he’d like to add. “Maybe I’ll do it after the election,” he said, adding that he could also host the gathering around the time of the U.N. General Assembly in New York City in September.