Morocco recalls its ambassador to Germany as tensions rise

Morocco recalls its ambassador to Germany as tensions rise

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Elimination of ‘qualified immunity’ a stumbling point in policing reform talks

Quiz: Can you name the TV show from its popular theme song?

‘Understand the threat’: Efforts to ban critical race theory in schools meet rocky reception

Quiz: Can you pass a pandemics, plagues and infectious diseases test?

Law used against Trump allies now at center of Giuliani probe

SPONSORED CONTENT

Commentary

Charles Hurt

Pinning the ‘California Dreaming’ on Caitlyn Jenner

Mike Pence

Ending the tyranny of cancel culture and building an agenda that will win back America

Scott Walker

Ending cancel culture’s reign on college campuses

View all

Question of the Day

Should Donald Trump be back on Facebook?

Question of the Day

 
Yes, it's his right to post

 
Maybe, if he follows the rules

 
No, he should stay banned

 
I don't care about Facebook

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By

Associated Press

Thursday, May 6, 2021

RABAT, Morocco (AP) – Morocco’s ambassador to Germany has been recalled to Rabat for “consultations,” the Moroccan Foreign Ministry said Thursday.

The North African kingdom’s move comes amid rising tensions with Germany, notably related to the disputed Western Sahara. The ministry also cited concerns about the two countries’ cooperation against terrorism and in settling Libya’s conflict.

In March, Morocco suspended ties with the German Embassy due to “deep misunderstandings” following then-U.S. President Donald Trump’s controversial decision in December to recognize Morocco’s sovereignty over the territory.

TOP STORIES

Pelosi refuses to denounce father's complicity in racism

Deterrent against China: Palau invites U.S. military to build on remote islands

Democrats worried Arizona audit may uncover fraud

The German Foreign Ministry said it was not informed in advance about the ambassador’s recall, adding that it was mystified by the allegations cited in the Moroccan Foreign Ministry’s statement.

“We are all the more surprised by this measure as we are working with the Moroccan side in a constructive way to resolve the crisis,” the ministry said, adding that it has asked Morocco for an explanation.

On Thursday, the Moroccan Foreign Ministry said in a statement that “Germany has distanced itself from the spirit of constructive solution with a destructive attitude on the issue of the Moroccan Sahara.” It accused Germany of “antagonistic activism” following Trump‘s decision.

The ministry also accused German authorities of acting “with complicity towards an individual formerly convicted of acts of terror, by disclosing sensitive information communicated by the Moroccan security services to their German counterparts.”

It did not name the individual, or elaborate on the accusations.

And the ministry said Germany exhibited a “continued determination to counter Morocco’s regional influence, particularly on the Libyan issue,” after Morocco was not included in important Libya peace talks in Berlin in January.

After Morocco froze relations with the German Embassy in March, Germany’s government said it saw no reason for a deterioration of its good diplomatic relations with Morocco.

The Algeria-backed Polisario Front fought for independence for Western Sahara after Morocco annexed the former Spanish colony in 1975. U.N. peacekeepers now monitor a 30-year-old cease-fire between Moroccan forces and Polisario supporters.

The U.N. has expressed concern that Trump’s decision – in exchange for Morocco normalizing diplomatic ties with Israel – could thwart negotiation efforts in the long-running Western Sahara conflict. Many countries, including Germany, support a U.N.-brokered political solution.

Egypt, Turkey officials meet for talks to reset frayed ties

Egypt, Turkey officials meet for talks to reset frayed ties

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Elimination of ‘qualified immunity’ a stumbling point in policing reform talks

Quiz: Can you name the TV show from its popular theme song?

‘Understand the threat’: Efforts to ban critical race theory in schools meet rocky reception

Quiz: Can you pass a pandemics, plagues and infectious diseases test?

Law used against Trump allies now at center of Giuliani probe

SPONSORED CONTENT

Commentary

Mike Pence

Canceling the radical left and building an agenda that will win back America

Kelly Sadler

Big Tech working to turn America blue

David Bossie

Cheney’s messaging not helping to defeat Dems’ socialist agenda in the 2022 election

View all

Question of the Day

Should Donald Trump be back on Facebook?

Question of the Day

 
Yes, it's his right to post

 
Maybe, if he follows the rules

 
No, he should stay banned

 
I don't care about Facebook

  View results

Story TOpics

Turkish Foreign Ministry Deputy Sedat Onal, seated right, meets with Hamdi Sanad Loza, Egyptian deputy foreign minister along with their delegations, at the foreign ministry in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, May 5, 2021. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty) more >

Print

By SAMY MAGDY

Associated Press

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

CAIRO (AP) – Egyptian and Turkish officials met Wednesday for talks aiming to reset ties between the two regional powers after years of enmity.

The two-day “political consultations” in Cairo are chaired by Hamdi Loza, Egypt’s deputy foreign minister, and his Turkish counterpart Sedat Onal.

Egypt’s Foreign Ministry, which announced the meetings in a statement late Tuesday, described the talks as “exploratory discussions” that would focus on “the necessary steps that may lead towards the normalization of relations between the two countries, bilaterally and in the regional context.”

TOP STORIES

Trump launches new communications platform after Facebook, Twitter bans

Beer and Benjamins: States dangle incentives for vaccine holdouts

Report: Texas Democrat who called Tim Scott 'oreo' resigns

The English-language version of Egypt’s state-run Ahram daily quoted an unnamed Egyptian official as saying the talks came after a year of direct and indirect communications to avert a confrontation between the two U.S. allies in Libya, where they back opposing side in the conflict.

Egypt and Turkey have been at loggerheads since the Egyptian military’s 2013 ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, who hailed from the Muslim Brotherhood group, supported by Turkey. Egypt has designated the group a terrorist organization.

Recently, top Turkish officials signaled a warming of ties with Egypt, a shift from their previous, sharply critical approach to Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi’s government.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on March 12 that the two countries have had “intelligence, diplomatic and economic” contacts, adding that he hoped for “strong” ties between the two nations.

Turkish Trade Minister Mehmet Mus said earlier this week that Ankara also wants to boost economic and trade ties with Cairo, which remains Turkey’s biggest African trade partner, with a $4.86-billion-vlue in trade last year.

A week after Erdogan’s remarks, his government asked three Istanbul-based Egyptian TV channels linked to the Brotherhood to soften their critical political coverage of the Egyptian government, according to editors at the stations. The TV channels promptly stopped broadcasting some political programs.

Egypt welcomed the move, calling it a “good initiative from the Turkish side that establishes a favorable atmosphere to discuss issues of dispute between the two nations.”

Egyptian officials say Turkey must take substantial steps toward “genuine” talks to mend ties, including withdrawing hundreds of Turkish troops and thousands of Syrian mercenaries brought to Libya by Turkey, and also hand over Islamists wanted by Egypt on terror-related charges.

Claudia Gazzini, a Libya expert at the International Crisis Group, said a possible Egypt-Turkey rapprochement would help stabilize Libya, which has recently become a theater of rivalry between regional and world powers.

“There is not doubt that if these two regional rivals find a way to work together, improve bilateral ties and commercial ties and de-escalate what was a very confrontational relation over the past years, this will reflect in pushing forward political stability in Libya,” she said.

The two nations back opposing sides in Libya. Egypt, Greece and some other European countries were angered by a 2019 Turkish deal with Libyan officials that aimed to boost Turkish maritime rights and influence in the eastern Mediterranean.

Egypt and Greece responded by signing a separate deal to delineate their maritime boundaries, a deal which Ankara rejected.

Libya’s top diplomat urges withdrawal of foreign fighters

Libya’s top diplomat urges withdrawal of foreign fighters

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Elimination of ‘qualified immunity’ a stumbling point in policing reform talks

Quiz: Can you name the TV show from its popular theme song?

‘Understand the threat’: Efforts to ban critical race theory in schools meet rocky reception

Quiz: Can you pass a pandemics, plagues and infectious diseases test?

Law used against Trump allies now at center of Giuliani probe

SPONSORED CONTENT

Vietnam 2021

SPONSORED CONTENT

Commentary

Ronald Kessler

Joe Biden and Jimmy Carter, two of the phoniest presidents in American history

Cal Thomas

Differences between Joe Biden and Tim Scott

Richard W. Rahn

Chamber of Commerce’s misguided support of Dems’ costly economic agenda

View all

Question of the Day

Should the government start paying people to get a COVID-19 vaccination?

Question of the Day

 
Yes, get more people vaccinated

 
No, people should do it for free

 
Maybe, that might convince me

 
No amount of $ would convince me

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By SAMY MAGDY

Associated Press

Monday, May 3, 2021

CAIRO (AP) – Libya’s top diplomat Monday called for the departure of foreign forces and mercenaries from the North African country as it heads toward elections later this year.

Najla al-Manqoush, foreign minister of Libya’s interim government, urged Turkey to implement U.N. Security Council resolutions demanding the repatriation of more than 20,000 foreign fighters and mercenaries from Libya.

Her remarks came at a joint news conference with Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu. He visited the capital of Tripoli with Defense Minister Hulusi Akar and other top military and intelligence officials.

TOP STORIES

James O'Keefe's Project Veritas announces anti-defamation legal arm with music video

Cindy McCain blasts Arizona GOP for 2020 ballot audit

Supreme Court rejects West Point cadet's case after rape allegations on campus

“We call on (Turkey) to take steps to implement all the provisions of … the Security Council resolutions and to cooperate together to expel all foreign forces and mercenaries from the Libyan territories,” she said.

The remarks were seen as a rebuke to Turkey, which has deployed troops and Syrian mercenaries to fight along with Tripoli militias since forces of military commander Khalifa Hifter launched their attack on the capital in 2019.

Cavusoglu responded by saying that Turkish forces were in Libya as part of a training agreement reached with a previous Libya administration. “There are those who equate our legal presence … with the foreign mercenary groups that fight in this country for money,” he said.

The Libyan foreign minister could face criticism from pro-Turkey Libyans for ideological reasons and also others in Tripoli who still fear a new attack from eastern-based forces, said Jalel Harchaoui, senior Libya researcher at the Geneva-based Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime.

The departure of hundreds of Turkish troops “is by all means a hard thing to implement,” he said. “Very difficult for Tripoli – because a very large (mercenary) mission is still in central Libya and could help (Hifter) march west again. And very difficult for Turkey – because it has spent untold amounts on making sure its presence in western Libya remains entrenched for a long while.”

Turkey has been closely involved in Libya. It backed the U.N.-recognized Government of National Accord based in Tripoli against Hifter’s forces. Turkey sent military supplies and fighters to Libya helping to tilt the balance of power in favor of the GNA.

Turkey also signed an agreement with the Tripoli-based government delineating the maritime boundaries between the two countries in the Mediterranean. That triggered protests from Greece and Cyprus. Both countries denounced the agreement saying it was a serious breach of international law that disregarded the rights of other eastern Mediterranean countries.

Libya was plunged into chaos when a NATO-backed uprising in 2011 toppled longtime ruler Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed. The oil-rich country was in recent years split between rival east- and west-based administrations, each backed by different armed groups and foreign governments.

Libya’s interim government, which took power in March, is tasked with bringing together a country that has been torn apart by civil war for nearly a decade. It also aims to steer Libya through a general election on Dec. 24.

Security Council diplomats say there are more than 20,000 foreign fighters and mercenaries in Libya, including 13,000 Syrians and 11,000 Sudanese, along with Russians and Chadians.

The Security Council’s 15 member nations agreed in an informal meeting last week that getting the foreign fighters and mercenaries to go home was the only way forward, according to the officials.

___

Associated Press writer Suzan Frazer contributed from Ankara, Turkey.

UN envoy meets east-based Libya commander in push for unity

UN envoy meets east-based Libya commander in push for unity

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Detroit officials offer explanation on white van claim by ‘Stop the Steal’ advocates

Quiz: Can you pass a World War II history test?

Overwhelmed Border Patrol fears ‘mass migration’ under Biden’s catch-and-release policy

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

‘McCarthyism from the left’: Police forces reject claims White supremacists prevalent in ranks

SPONSORED CONTENT

Commentary

Henry Barbour

A path forward for the GOP in 2022 and 2024

Tom Basile

Bring on the GOP shadow Cabinet

Charles Hurt

The great humility of Rush Limbaugh, on loan from God

View all

Question of the Day

Do you support raising the federal minimum wage to $15?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

FILE – In this July 13, 2014 file photo, Jan Kubis, United Nation representative for Afghanistan speaks during a joint press conference at the Independent Election Commission office in Kabul, Afghanistan. Kubis, the U.N. special envoy to Libya on Friday, … more >

Print

By NOHA ELHENNAWY

Associated Press

Friday, February 19, 2021

CAIRO (AP) – The U.N. special envoy to Libya on Friday met with the country’s east-based military commander as part of efforts to unite rival factions in the war-torn North African nation ahead of elections in December.

During their meeting in the eastern city of Benghazi, U.N. envoy Jan Kubis and the Libyan commander, Khalifa Hifter, agreed on the importance for all Libyan parties to commit to and facilitate the Dec. 24 balloting, according to a statement for the U.N. mission in Libya.

The elections were laid out under a U.N.-backed political roadmap for the fractured country.

TOP STORIES

'New Cold War': Chinese president issues stark warning to Biden

Migrant smugglers take advantage of Texas deep freeze

Palin eyed as Murkowski primary challenger after impeachment vote

Kubis‘ visit follows a key development earlier this month at U.N.-backed talks in Switzerland, when Libyan delegates chose a transitional government, with a prime minister and a three-member presidential council, meant to lead Libya through the elections. The election was a major step toward unifying Libya and ending one of the most intractable conflicts left behind by the Arab Spring.

For years, Libya’s influential east-based military commander, Khalifa Hifter, has been a controversial figure. In 2019, he launched an offensive to capture the capital, Tripoli, a campaign that ultimately failed the following year.

Kubis and Hifter also discussed ways to expedite the implementation of a cease-fire agreement signed last year and the withdrawal of all foreign forces and mercenaries. According to the U.N. mission’s statement, they also discussed the opening of a key Libyan artery – the coastal road along the Mediterranean Sea that links Tripoli, to the west, with Benghazi.

Since 2015, Libya has been divided between two rival administrations: a U.N.-backed, but weak government in Tripoli – a city largely controlled by an array of armed factions – and an eastern-based government backed Hifter. Each is backed by different foreign governments.

This is Kubis’ first visit to Libya since his appointment to the post in January. Earlier, the former Slovak foreign minister served as U.N. envoy to Lebanon. A day before meeting Hifter, Kubis held talks in Tripoli with the president of the newly elected, three-member presidential council, Mohamed Menefi, and other Libyan politicians.

Libya descended into chaos after the ouster of longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi in 2011. It has since also become a haven for Islamic militants and armed groups that survive on looting and human trafficking.

Arab League head hopes Biden changes Trump Mideast policies

Arab League head hopes Biden changes Trump Mideast policies

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Big Tech declares war: ‘Woke capitalism instead of freedom’

Quiz: Do you remember these grumpy TV characters?

Trump attorneys pursuing voting fraud claims snatch defeat from jaws of victory

Quiz: Can you pass a U.S. Constitution test?

College Fix editor puts student journalists on front line of fight for free speech

SPONSORED CONTENT

Commentary

Clifford D. May

The many reasons Biden should not enrich Iran’s rulers

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

Solving the social media conundrum: More normalcy with fewer eccentrics and sociopaths

Charles Hurt

Joe Biden’s mandate: Don’t call it the China virus …

View all

Question of the Day

Should D.C. become a state?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By EDITH M. LEDERER

Associated Press

Monday, January 18, 2021

UNITED NATIONS (AP) – The head of the Arab League expressed hope Monday that the Biden administration will change President Donald Trump’s policies and launch a political process supported by regional and international parties to achieve independence for the Palestinians.

Ahmed Aboul Gheit, secretary-general of the 22-member organization, told the U.N. Security Council that a two-state solution to the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict “has been marginalized by the main mediator in the peace process,” a reference to the United States.

“This encouraged the Israeli government to intensify its settlement activities and to threaten to take dangerous and destructive steps such as annexing occupied land,” he said.

TOP STORIES

Hunter Biden laptop repairman posts tell-all videos

Rep. Lauren Boebert fires back after Rep. Steve Cohen says she led Capitol tour before riot

Liz Cheney censured in Wyoming for vote to impeach Trump: 'Did not represent our voice'

The Arab League chief addressed the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in a wide-ranging briefing on the crises and conflicts in the Middle East.

He also referred without name to Iran, saying that “some regional powers are interfering in the affairs of the Arab region” by adversely affecting “the security of international maritime navigation routes which are a lifeline for international trade,” a reference to freedom of navigation in the Persian Gulf.

“It has also become apparent that this interference perpetuates existing conflicts and further complicates them,” he said, without directly citing Iran’s support for Syrian President Bashar Assad, for Yemen’s Houthi Shiite rebels and for Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip.

Aboul Gheit said the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing conflicts and crises have created “a dangerous mix that has taken a heavy toll on the peoples of the region,” pointing to 10 years of civil war in Syria, Yemen’s war entering its seventh year and “entrenched divisions in Libya.”

He spoke a day after Israeli authorities advanced plans to build nearly 800 homes in West Bank settlements, in a last-minute surge of approvals before U.S. President Donald Trump leaves office Wednesday and Joe Biden is inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States. Palestinian leaders denounced the Israeli action.

The Palestinians claim all of the West Bank, captured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war, as part of a future independent state. They say the growing settler population, approaching some 500,000 people, makes it increasingly difficult to achieve their dream of independence.

Aboul Gheit said that “significant efforts” need to be made by all parties in coming months to reaffirm the two-state solution.

“We look forward to the new American administration rectifying policies and processes that are not useful and engage in a fruitful political process with the support of influential regional and international parties,” he said. “This would give the Palestinian people renewed hope that the international community would stand by its side in its noble aspiration to achieve freedom and independence.”

On Syria, Aboul Gheit said five countries are interfering militarily and the “security situation remains tumultuous and precarious, especially in the northwest, northeast and south.” This not only undermines prospects of a political settlement but also has equally serious humanitarian repercussions, with 90% of Syrians living in poverty, he said.

“I am convinced that a genuine solution would start with a minimal level of international consensus, which is still lacking,” and would require some regional parties to reduce their involvement in Syria, Aboul Gheit said. “Those regional parties continue to view Syria land as spoils of war or use it to settle scores,.

In Yemen, the Arab League chief said the situation “is as dangerous, especially the humanitarian situation,” with some Yemenis on the bring of starvation.

He strongly backed efforts by U.N. special envoy Martin Griffiths to get agreement between the Houthis and the internationally recognized government on a joint declaration calling for a cease-fire and confidence-building measures. He said the Saudi-negotiated agreement on a new Cabinet “is a positive sign that the fragmentation and division are coming to an end,” which “paves the way for negotiations on a comprehensive solution.”

As for Libya, Aboul Gheit said recent events “could bring us closer to ending the division in this important Arab country.”

After the 2011 overthrow and killing of dictator Moammar Gadhafi, oil-rich Libya was split between rival administrations in its east and west, each backed by an array of militias and foreign powers. The warring sides agreed to a U.N.-brokered cease-fire in October, a deal that included the departure of foreign forces and mercenaries within three months and holding presidential and parliamentary elections on Dec. 24, 2021.

Aboul Gheit urged implementation of the cease-fire agreement as well as ending recruitment of foreign fighters and stopping shipments of weapons and military equipment to Libya.

UN urges Iran to address nuclear, ballistic missile concerns

UN urges Iran to address nuclear, ballistic missile concerns

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Red alert: Chinese boast of operatives ‘inside America’s core circle of power’

Quiz: Take the Ultimate Acronym Test (UAT)

Black Lives Matter movement accused of morphing into financial ‘racket’

Quiz: Take the political scandals in U.S. history test

Scientist ties coronavirus spread to Neanderthal retreat

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Joseph Curl

Neera Tanden just a sacrificial lamb for other Biden picks

Peter Morici

Why forgiving student debt makes sense

Charles Hurt

Waiting for Kraken

View all

Question of the Day

Will you trust the results of U.S. elections again?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By EDITH M. LEDERER

Associated Press

Tuesday, December 8, 2020

UNITED NATIONS (AP) – Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is urging Iran to address concerns raised about its nuclear and ballistic missile programs and return to “full implementation” of its 2015 nuclear deal with major powers.

The U.N. chief expressed regret in a report to the Security Council obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press that the Trump administration withdrew from the agreement in 2018 and re-imposed sanctions against Tehran, and at Iran’s 2019 decision to violate limits in the deal including on centrifuges and enriching uranium.

Guterres said in the report on implementation of a council resolution endorsing the 2015 nuclear agreement that for the last five years the nuclear deal “has been largely viewed by the international community as a testament to the efficacy of multilateralism, diplomacy and dialogue, and a success in nuclear nonproliferation.”

TOP STORIES

Thomas Jefferson, George Mason schools to be renamed in Va. district so everyone can 'feel safe'

Eric Swalwell now thinks Trump colluded with Axios

Trump says he'll join Texas' election challenge at Supreme Court

But President Donald Trump has waged war on the nuclear agreement, denouncing it during the 2016 campaign as the worst deal ever negotiated, and he has kept up opposition in the years since the U.S. pullout in 2018.

The Trump administration maintains the agreement – the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA – is fatally flawed because certain restrictions on Iran’s nuclear activity gradually expire and will allow the country to eventually develop atomic weapons. In August, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo formally notified the U.N. that it was invoking a provision of the 2015 deal to restore U.N. sanctions, citing significant Iranian violations and declaring: “The United States will never allow the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism to freely buy and sell planes, tanks, missiles and other kinds of conventional weapons … (or) to have a nuclear weapon.”

But the remaining parties to the JCPOA — Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany — as well as the overwhelming majority of the Security Council called the U.S. action illegal because the U.S. had withdrawn from the treaty. The council and the secretary-general both said there would be no action on the U.S. demands — which meant there would be no U.N. demand for countries to re-impose U.N. sanctions on Iran.

Nonetheless, concerns by the U.S. as well as the European parties to the JCPOA have increased, especially with Iran continuing to violate the deal’s limits. Iran has openly announced all its violations of the nuclear deal in advance and said they are reversible.

The deal promised Iran economic incentives in exchange for the curbs on its nuclear program. Since the U.S. withdrawal and its imposition of new sanctions, Tehran has tried to put pressure on the remaining parties using the violations to come up with new ways to offset the economy-crippling actions by Washington.

Secretary-General Guterres recounted the U.S. actions and Security Council response in the report and stressed again “the importance of initiatives in support of trade and economic relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran, especially during the current economic and health challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.”

As for implementation of the 2015 Security Council resolution endorsing the JCPOA, the secretary-general said he focused on restrictions on nuclear, ballistic missile, and arms-related transfers to or from Iran.

He said Israel provided information about the presence of four alleged Iranian Dehlavieh anti-tank guided missiles in Libya in June. On the basis of photographic evidence, he said, one missile “had characteristics consistent with the Iranian-produced Dehlavieh” but the U.N. Secretariat has been unable to determine if it had been transferred to Libya in violation of the resolution.

On Australia’s June 2019 arms seizure, Guterres said analysis of high-definition images of some material determined that “the 7.62 mm ammunition in this seizure were not of Iranian manufacture.”

The secretary-general said the U.N. received information that an unnamed “entity” on the sanctions blacklist took actions “inconsistent” with its frozen assets and actions to ship “valves, electronics, and measuring equipment suitable for use in ground testing of liquid propellant ballistic missiles and space launch vehicles” to Iran. He said the U.N. Secretariat is seeking further information.

The Security Council is scheduled to discuss the report on Dec. 22.

Turkey probes German navy’s search of Libya-bound freighter

Turkey probes German navy’s search of Libya-bound freighter

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘One kind of fraud’: Biden won thousands of illegal votes by noncitizens, study shows

Quiz: Can you pass the Declaration of Independence test?

Climate legislation ‘to fix a problem that doesn’t exist’ imperils livelihood of towns

Quiz: Can you match the songs to these 1980s one-hit wonders?

Trump plotting his ultimate revenge: Getting the last laugh in 2024

SPONSORED CONTENT

Don’t Leave Contact Lens Patients on the Wrong End of a Raw Deal

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Google, Facebook and Twitter fixed the election for Biden over Trump

Charles Hurt

Joe Biden and the ‘Strolling Bones’

Scott Walker

COVID-19 pandemic is a reminder to return to faith and family

View all

Question of the Day

Are you traveling for Thanksgiving?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By

Associated Press

Friday, November 27, 2020

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) – Turkish prosecutors launched an investigation Friday into the search of a Turkish commercial freighter by the crew of a German frigate participating in a European Union mission to enforce an arms embargo on Libya.

Turkey has protested the incident on the Mediterranean Sea, insisting personnel from the German frigate Hamburg illegally searched the Libya-bound freighter Rosaline-A on Nov. 22.. Germany has rejected Turkey’s complaints, arguing the frigate’s crew acted correctly.

In a brief statement announcing its investigation, the Ankara Chief Prosecutor’s office said the search was conducted without “Turkey’s authorization and against international regulations.” The probe is not expected to lead to arrests or the extradition of officials involved in the search.

TOP STORIES

'The Plot Against The President': Twitter suspends account of popular conservative movie

Dominion software manipulated votes — 289K in Michigan, 96K in Georgia, lawsuits claim

Black Lives Matter activists, Biden, and Fauci nominated for Time's 'Person of the Year' award

The Hamburg is part of the European Union’s Operation Irini, a mission launched in March with the goal of enforcing the United Nations’ arms embargo on Libya and tasked with inspecting vessels thought to be carrying weapons to and from Libya.

German officials said the order to board the Rosaline-A came from the mission’s headquarters in Rome and that Turkey objected while the inspection team was on the freighter.

Turkey says the search was “unauthorized and conducted by force” and insisted that its objections prior to the search were ignored.

It was the second incident between Turkey and naval forces from a NATO ally enforcing an arms blockade against Libya.

In June, NATO launched an investigation over an incident between Turkish warships and a French naval vessel in the Mediterranean. France said one of its frigates was “lit up” three times by Turkish targeting radar when it tried to approach a Turkish civilian ship suspected of involvement in arms trafficking.

Turkey supports a U.N.-backed government in Tripoli against rival forces based in the country’s east. It has complained that the EU naval operation focuses its efforts too much on the Tripoli administration and turns a blind eye to weapons sent to the eastern-based forces.

France reacts after Erdogan questions Macron’s mental health

France reacts after Erdogan questions Macron’s mental health

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Thin blue line lining up behind Trump: ‘This is make-or-break for law enforcement’

Quiz: How much do you know about U.S. presidents?

‘America’s Forgotten’: Democrat director discovers horrors of illegal immigration while making film

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

North Korea’s tyrant threatens Trump with new ballistic missile capable of targeting U.S.

SPONSORED CONTENT

This unique, American-made survival rifle is perfect for your go-bag

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Liberal media, Big Tech and progressives pursue a relentless revolution against free speech

David Keene

For Trump and Biden campaigns, it’s not just having money, but spending it wisely

Cheryl K. Chumley

Bernie Sanders as Biden’s labor secretary would devastate America

View all

Question of the Day

Who won the final presidential debate?

Question of the Day

 
Joseph R. Biden

 
Donald J. Trump

 
Tie

  View results

Story TOpics

Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, wearing a mask to help protect against the spread of coronavirus, greets his ruling party members gathered in a stadium, in Kayseri, Turkey, Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020. Turkey’s Health Minister Fahrettin Koca said Friday … more >

Print

By SYLVIE CORBET

Associated Press

Saturday, October 24, 2020

PARIS (AP) – France recalled its ambassador to Turkey for consultations after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said President Emmanuel Macron needed mental health treatment and made other comments that the French government described as unacceptably rude.

Erdogan questioned his French counterpart’s mental condition while criticizing Macron’s attitude toward Islam and Muslims. His remarks at a local party congress were an apparent response to statements Macron made this month about problems created by radical Muslims in France who practice what the French leader termed “Islamist separatism.”

“What is the problem of this person called Macron with Islam and Muslims?” Erdogan asked rhetorically during his Justice and Development party meeting in the central Anatolian city of Kayseri.

TOP STORIES

Taulia Tagovailoa, Maryland show room for improvement in loss to Northwestern,

Whitmer insists no evidence of Biden wrongdoing

AOC hedges on backing Pelosi again as speaker

“What else can be said to a head of state who does not understand freedom of belief and who behaves in this way to millions of people living in his country who are members of a different faith?” the Turkish leader continued.

The French presidency reacted hours later with a statement that said, “Excess and rudeness are not a method” and “We are not accepting insults.”

Using unusually strong language, the French presidency said, “We demand Erdogan to change his policy, which is dangerous in all aspects.”

The presidency point out that Erdogan, a devout Muslim, did not offer condolences following the beheading near Paris last week of a teacher who had shown in class some caricatures of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad. French judicial authorities are investigating the killing as an Islamist terror attack.

Tensions between NATO allies France and Turkey have intensified in recent months over issues that include the fighting in Syria, Libya and Nagorno-Karabakh, a region within Azerbaijan that is controlled by ethnic Armenian separatists.

Macron has notably accused Turkey of flouting its commitments by ramping up its military presence in Libya and bringing in jihadi fighters from Syria.

France also has sided with Greece and Cyprus in tensions with Turkey over offshore oil and gas drilling in the eastern Mediterranean, prompting criticism from Ankara.

______________

Andrew Wilks contributed to the story from Ankara, Turkey

UN envoy hails early agreements in Libya talks

UN envoy hails early agreements in Libya talks

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Thin blue line lining up behind Trump: ‘This is make-or-break for law enforcement’

Quiz: How much do you know about U.S. presidents?

‘America’s Forgotten’: Democrat director discovers horrors of illegal immigration while making film

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

North Korea’s tyrant threatens Trump with new ballistic missile capable of targeting U.S.

SPONSORED CONTENT

These American-made rifles and shotguns are perfect for hunting AND home defense

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael R. Pompeo

Every generation responsible for securing America’s freedom

Michael McKenna

Handful of indicators suggest Trump can win

Victor Davis Hanson

Will changes to American life after pandemic become permanent?

View all

Question of the Day

Should the FBI reveal what they know about Hunter Biden's laptop?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Print

By JAMEY KEATEN

Associated Press

Wednesday, October 21, 2020

GENEVA (AP) – The U.N. envoy for Libya said Wednesday the two warring factions have agreed on issues that “directly impact the lives and welfare of the Libyan people,” noting that the thorny work to cement a cease-fire in the restive North African country will continue.

Stephanie Turco Williams, the U.N. envoy, cited agreements to open air and land routes in the country, to work to ease inflammatory rhetoric in Libyan media, and to help kickstart Libya’s vital oil industry, as talks in Geneva continued this week under her mediation.

“I am pleased to report that the two sides have reached agreement on several important issues which directly impact the lives and welfare of the Libyan people,” she said. “I urge the two parties negotiating here in Geneva to solve all outstanding issues and forge a lasting cease fire agreement.”

TOP STORIES

Judicial Watch finds 1.8 million 'ghost voters' in 29 states, warns of 'dirty elections'

Sen. Mitt Romney mum on whether he voted for Biden: 'I did not vote for President Trump'

Republican governor to consider new stay-at-home order 'if the numbers dictate it'

Williams hailed “emerging hope” and “positive developments” for Libya’s future, while warning of socioeconomic troubles, rising cases of COVID-19 and the continued intervention and meddling of foreign powers in Libya’s internal conflict.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo commended “the Libyans’ reassertion of sovereignty” through the steps toward a cease-fire.

“We repeat our call, the United States’ call, for foreign forces to leave the country and to let Libyans decide their own future,” he told reporters in Washington, alluding to a meeting of Libyan leaders in Tunisia next month. “We look forward to the upcoming Libyan political dialogue forum and to supporting the transfer of power to a new executive authority.”

Libya is split between a U.N.-supported government in the capital, Tripoli, and rival authorities based in the east. The two sides are backed by an array of local militias as well as regional and foreign powers. The country was plunged into chaos after the 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled and killed longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Williams, an American who heads the U.N. support mission for Libya, said the talks involving the so-called Joint Military Commission will now take up arrangements for Libya’s central region, “paving the way for a cease-fire agreement.”

She said she was “quite optimistic” about the talks given the “air of seriousness and commitment” shown by the two sides.

The U.N. mission said the two sides agreed to work on restructuring the oil facilities guard along with the National Oil Corporation, a move Williams said would boost production.

U.N. organizers say the round is expected to run through Saturday, and Williams’ mission “hopes that the two delegations will reach a solution to all outstanding issues in order to achieve a complete and permanent cease-fire across Libya.”

The meetings make up the security aspect of three-track talks, also involving political and economic tracks, that are aimed at lifting Libya out of its grueling conflict.

In Tripoli, meanwhile, a local militia stormed the home of Mohammed Baio, head of the state-run media office, and detained him, security officials said.

The militia, known as Tripoli Revolutionaries Brigade, confirmed Baio’s detention, which came after he ordered state-run television stations and media outlets last week to “stop airing and publishing materials related to the civil war.”

The militias have accused the newly-appointed Baio of being a Gadhafi loyalist and have pressured the U.N.-supported government to sack him.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity out of fear of reprisal. There was no immediate comment from the Tripoli-based government.

___

Associated Press writers Samy Magdy in Cairo and Matthew Lee in Washington contributed.

Key players to meet virtually to push for Libya cease-fire

Key players to meet virtually to push for Libya cease-fire

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Surge in gun sales set to break record: ‘They’re buying everything’

Quiz: Man-made and natural disasters test

Election, vaccine uncertainty slow economic recovery in U.S.

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

China’s military might, aggressive policies spur talks of creating ‘Asian NATO’

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Trump, Vought, DeVos and Keim call out Marxist indoctrination in colleges and government agencies

Michael McKenna

Trump must stop talking and let Biden expose himself as empty vessel being filled by far-left

Everett Piper

‘I don’t care if Donald Trump is a jerk. He still has my vote’

View all

Question of the Day

Will Trump's COVID-19 diagnosis impact the election?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By EDITH M. LEDERER

Associated Press

Saturday, October 3, 2020

UNITED NATIONS (AP) – The United Nations and Germany are co-chairing a ministerial meeting on Monday of world powers and other countries with interests in Libya’s long-running civil war in hopes of promoting a cease-fire between its rival governments.

Germany’s deputy U.N. ambassador Günter Sautter said Friday the virtual meeting is “an important follow-up” to a conference of the same parties in Berlin on Jan. 19 that approved a 55-point road map to peace in oil-rich Libya and agreed to respect a much-violated arms embargo, hold off on military support to the warring parties, and push them to reach a full cease-fire.

Stephanie Williams, the top U.N. official for Libya, warned last month that the conflict-torn North African country is at “a decisive turning point,” with foreign backers of its rival governments pouring in weapons – in violation of the Berlin agreement – and the misery of its people compounded by the coronavirus pandemic.

TOP STORIES

Kyle Rittenhouse suing Biden, campaign

Chris Rock: Coronavirus smacked U.S. because 'Pelosi and the Democrats' obsessed over impeachment

Michael Moore doubts Trump's COVID-19 diagnosis: 'He's not above weaponizing this'

Sautter said Monday’s meeting “comes at a crucial moment.” He pointed to “some encouraging developments in Libya” including talks on security, “the long-term agreements on transition, and progress on the question of oil exports.”

In the years after the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime autocrat Moammar Gadhafi, Libya has sunk further into turmoil and is now divided between two rival administrations, based in the country’s east and west, with an array of fighters and militias – backed by various foreign powers – allied with each side.

Tensions escalated further when east-based forces, under commander Khalifa Hifter, launched an offensive in April 2019 trying to capture the capital, Tripoli. But Hifter’s campaign collapsed in June when militias backing the U.N.-supported government in Tripoli, with Turkish support, gained the upper hand.

Hifter is supported by the United Arab Emirates, Russia, Jordan and Egypt while the Tripoli forces are supported by the wealthy Gulf state of Qatar and by Turkey, a bitter rival of Egypt and the UAE in a broader regional struggle over political Islam.

Sautter said Germany hopes participants in Monday’s meeting – co-chaired by U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas – will renew their commitments to the Berlin road map and its implementation.

“We hope that they will call on the parties to accelerate efforts to achieve a cease-fire,” Sautter said. “We hope that continuing blatant violations of the arms embargo will end.”

U.N. experts monitoring sanctions against Libya said in a report, seen by The Associated Press last month, that the arms embargo was being violated by both sides and their foreign backers, and remains “totally ineffective.”

They said 11 companies also violated the arms embargo, including the Wagner Group, a private Russian security company that the panel said in May provided between 800 and 1,200 mercenaries to Hifter.

Sautter said Germany also hopes Monday’s meeting “will strengthen the United Nations as key facilitator of the political dialogue in Libya.”

Turkey: UN registers maritime deal reached with Tripoli

Turkey: UN registers maritime deal reached with Tripoli

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Surge in gun sales set to break record: ‘They’re buying everything’

Quiz: Man-made and natural disasters test

Election, vaccine uncertainty slow economic recovery in U.S.

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

China’s military might, aggressive policies spur talks of creating ‘Asian NATO’

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Everett Piper

‘I don’t care if Donald Trump is a jerk. He still has my vote’

Scott Walker

If ideas matter, Trump won the debate

Michael McKenna

Supreme Court with Barrett would strengthen a broken Congress

View all

Question of the Day

Will Trump's COVID-19 diagnosis impact the election?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Print

By

Associated Press

Friday, October 2, 2020

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) – The United Nations has registered a maritime delineation deal reached between Turkey and Libya’s U.N.-backed government, the Turkish Defense Ministry announced Friday.

Last year, Turkey and the Government of National Accord, or GNA, which is based in Tripoli, reached a memorandum of understanding demarcating their maritime boundaries. The agreement, which would allow them to lay claim to large areas of the Mediterranean Sea and potential energy deposits, was denounced by Greece, Cyprus and other nations.

“The U.N. has registered the maritime jurisdiction deal as agreed between Turkey and Libya,” the ministry announced on its Twitter account. ” Our deep ties with Libya based on over 500 years of history will continue to strengthen.”

TOP STORIES

Officials: Amy Coney Barrett had coronavirus, recovered

'I denounce racism': Black leader insists Proud Boys are not White supremacists

House Republicans demand hearings on rioters' funding sources

Greece and Cyprus have protested the deal, which added tension to an ongoing dispute over oil-and-gas drilling rights in the eastern Mediterranean.

Turkey and the GNA also signed a security and military cooperation agreement last year. Turkey earlier this year sent troops, Syrian mercenaries and other military support that helped the GNA repel an assault by the rival, eastern-based Libyan National Army and shifted the tide of the conflict.

“We will continue to provide training and advisory services to the U.N.-recognized, legitimate government of Libya,” the ministry said.

Pentagon: Russian mercenaries laying landmines, IEDs in Libya

Pentagon: Russian mercenaries laying landmines, IEDs in Libya

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Rise of Kim Jong-un’s sister marks increase North Korean cyberattacks

Quiz: Can you pass a U.S. Constitution test?

New St. Andrews College president under fire after ‘we know science’ bathroom video

Quiz: Are you smarter than an 8th grader?

Not so Top Gun: Navy’s newest $13 billion supercarrier plagued by mechanical woes

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Andrew P. Napolitano

A brief history of the freedom of speech in America

Michael McKenna

Expect huge tax increases and a slumping economy if Biden wins

Tammy Bruce

Cancel culture punishes Goya Foods over pro-Trump remarks; calls for boycott land with a thud

View all

Question of the Day

Should schools re-open in the fall?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Verified image of an improvised explosive device found in Tripoli. (Image courtesy of U.S. Africa Command Public Affairs) more >

Print

By Ben Wolfgang

The Washington Times

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

The Pentagon on Wednesday said it has “clear evidence” that Russian-backed mercenaries in Libya have used landmines, IEDs and other booby traps in and around the country’s capital of Tripoli, violating international law and putting innocent civilian lives in danger.

In a lengthy statement Wednesday, U.S. Africa Command released photos of the Russian devices, which were discovered over the past month in Tripoli, Sirte, and surrounding areas. The U.S. military specifically singled out the Wagner Group — a Russian paramilitary organization estimated to have as many as 2,000 fighters inside Libya — as being responsible and said the actions are further violations of United Nations regulations limiting the movement of arms into Libya.

Pentagon officials blasted Russian political leadership for prolonging the bloodshed inside Libya, which remains locked in a civil war between rebel forces and a U.N.-backed government in Tripoli.

TOP STORIES

Cancel culture punishes Goya Foods over pro-Trump remarks; calls for boycott land with a thud

'We need to shut down': Texas Democrats call on Greg Abbott to issue stay-at-home order

Trump plans to send federal authorities into cities to break up 'war zone' of violence

“The Russian-state sponsored Wagner Group is demonstrating a total disregard for the safety and security of Libyans,” said U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Bradford Gering, director of operations for U.S. Africa Command. “The Wagner Group’s irresponsible tactics are prolonging conflict and are responsible for the needless suffering and the deaths of innocent civilians. Russia has the power to stop them, just not the will.”

The latest accusations against Russia come less than two months after the Pentagon said that Moscow had moved fighter jets into Libya. Taken together, the actions demonstrate Moscow’s clear intention to deepen its involvement in the conflict.

Russia, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates are backing Gen. Khalifa Haftar’s Libyan National Army (LNA) in the war, while Turkey is allied with the internationally recognized Government of National Accord forces.

The U.S. also formally backs the Government of National Accord, though the Trump administration’s policy has been murky at best, and President Trump last year had a cordial phone call with Gen. Haftar, raising questions about American allegiance.

The two sides continue trying to hash out a sweeping ceasefire agreement.

As the conflict plays out, American military officials said Russian-backed fighters must stop putting civilian lives in jeopardy.

“Our intelligence reflects continued and unhelpful involvement by Russia and the Wagner Group,” said Rear Adm. Heidi Berg, AFRICOM’s director of intelligence. “Imagery and intelligence assessments show how Russia continues to interfere in Libyan affairs. Wagner Group’s reckless use of landmines and booby-traps are harming innocent civilians.

Russia, Turkey seeking immediate Libya cease-fire: Report

Russia, Turkey seeking immediate Libya cease-fire: Report

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Strategic considerations’: John Roberts’ swing votes all about politics, court watchers say

Quiz: Can you pass the Declaration of Independence test?

Misguided ‘defund police’ movement undercuts effort to change culture, experts warn

Quiz: Do you remember the 2000s?

Mayflower Hotel speech drove liberal media overkill, empty Russia scandal

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Andrew P. Napolitano

America’s tyrants and anarchists squeeze personal liberties in a vise

Tammy Bruce

Marxist mobs sweep into cities, call for defunding of police, tear down statues and create havoc

Joseph Curl

CNN loved Obama trip to ‘majestic’ Mount Rushmore, hates Trump visit to ‘racist’ monument

View all

Question of the Day

Should Bubba Wallace apologize, as Trump suggested?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

In this photo provided by Russian Foreign Ministry Press Service, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, welcomes Libya’s parliament speaker Aguila Saleh for talks in Moscow, Russia, Friday, July 3, 2020. Russia’s top diplomat met Friday with the speaker of … more >

Print

By Lauren Meier

The Washington Times

Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Russia and Turkey are reportedly trying to establish an immediate cease-fire deal in the conflict in Libya, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Wednesday, as quoted by Russia’s Interfax news outlet.

Libya — which has been locked in a civil war since 2014 — has gone without a stable government since a 2011 rebellion ousted and killed longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Mr. Lavrov said that the Russian-backed Libyan National Army (LNA) has approved a cease-fire agreement and is ready to sign. He said he hopes that Turkey will urge Libya’s Government of National Accord (GNA) to sign as well.

TOP STORIES

Robert De Niro's restaurant chain Nobu took 14 PPP loans

Susan Collins' 'toss-up' Senate race takes nasty turn under national spotlight

Ilhan Omar vows 'whole system' of U.S. economy must be gutted due to 'oppression'

The United Nations in recent years recognized the GNA in Tripoli born out of U.N.-mediated talks in 2015.

Qatar and Italy have also supported Tripoli, although Turkey has emerged as its biggest backer. On the other side, Russia, the United Arab Emirates, France and Egypt are seen to back the LNA’s rebel commander, Khalifa Haftar.

Russian FM hosts speaker of Libya’s east-based parliament

Russian FM hosts speaker of Libya’s east-based parliament

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Morale is lower with White officers’ in wake of George Floyd’s death in police custody

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

Grim math of the border: Media hypes ‘haunting’ deaths, ignores thousands of rescues

Quiz: Can you match the nickname to the Major League Baseball player?

Benjamin Netanyahu maintaining vow to annex West Bank land by July 1

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cheryl K. Chumley

America groans under the weight of disunity

Everett Piper

Al Gore, U.N. secretary-general and other elitists call for a ‘great reset’ of the global economy

Robert Knight

Left-wing activist wants to replace ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ with Lennon’s ‘Imagine’

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By

Associated Press

Friday, July 3, 2020

MOSCOW (AP) – Russia’s top diplomat met Friday with the speaker of the parliament based in eastern Libya to discuss a political settlement for the conflict-stricken country.

Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said at the start of his talks with parliament speaker Aguila Saleh that Moscow supports a cease-fire proposal brokered by Egypt last month. He emphasized that Russia will reach out to all parties in Libya to help encourage a political settlement.

“Russia has proceeded from the assumption that the Libyan conflict has no military solution, and only the Libyans themselves could settle their differences by political means,” Lavrov said.

TOP STORIES

NFL to play Black anthem before 'Star-Spangled Banner': Report

Barr orders legal action against governors whose COVID-19 actions infringe on civil rights

Liberal group plans protests against July 4th in 13 cities, tells members to 'take to the streets'

Libya was plunged into chaos following a NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi in 2011. The country has been split between a government in the east allied with military commander Khalifa Hifter and another one in Tripoli in the west supported by the United Nations.

Hifter has been backed by Egypt, Russia, France and the United Arab Emirates, while the Tripoli-allied militias have been aided by Turkey, Qatar and Italy.

Last year, Hifter’s forces launched an offensive trying to capture Tripoli, clashing with an array of militias loosely allied with the government there, but the attack has failed. After making their way deep into the west and fighting in the suburbs of the Libyan capital, Hifter’s forces were driven back by Tripoli-based fighters supported by Turkey.

Libya oil company: Russian mercenaries enter major oilfield

Libya oil company: Russian mercenaries enter major oilfield

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘A fundamental challenge’: William Barr says U.S. is cracking down on Chinese spying

Quiz: Do you remember these popular TV couples?

EXCLUSIVE: U.K. assassination attempt reveals illegal Russian chemical weapons push

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton; predicts historic economic recovery

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

David Keene

Rioters who burned police stations and businesses may find their nemesis, Trump, reelected

Peter Morici

Investors that stick with stocks will be rewarded as economy reopens

Everett Piper

Welcome to the neo-Marxist ‘Church of Holy Wokeness’

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

FILE – In this Feb. 26, 2011 file photo, a Libyan oil worker, works at a refinery inside the Brega oil complex, in Brega, eastern Libya. ON Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020, the National Oil Corporation in Libya says that a … more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Friday, June 26, 2020

CAIRO (AP) – Russian and other foreign mercenaries have entered Libya’s largest oil field, the country’s National Oil Corporation said on Friday, describing the development as an attempt to thwart the resumption of halted oil production in the war-torn country.

In divided Libya, Russia is a leading backer of the east-based forces led by commander Khalifa Hifter, who has been waging war against the U.N.-supported government in the capital, Tripoli, which is mainly backed by Turkey.

The Russian mercenaries first met late on Thursday with the guards of Libya’s vast southwestern Sharara oilfield, controlled by Hifter’s eastern-based fighters, according to a statement from the National Oil Corporation, or NOC.

TOP STORIES

Florida Dems boast mail-in voter lead, buck Trump fraud warnings

IG Report confirms Obama lied about Hillary's emails

Parler topples 'tech tyrant' Twitter in Apple 'News App' store

Earlier this year, a militia known as the Petroleum Facilities Guard, which takes orders from Hifter’s forces, helped shut down oil production when Hifter-allied tribes led a blockade of Libya’s oil ports – a challenge to the Tripoli administration.

While Hifter’s east-based forces control Libya’s oil crescent, the Tripoli government in the west controls the national Central Bank reserves, mostly drawn from oil income. Although Libya has Africa’s largest oil reserves, it has been unable to export oil since Hifter’s blockade started in January, costing the state corporation over $6 billion in lost revenue. Libya’s was producing over 1.2 million barrels per day before the shutdown.

“While foreign mercenaries continue to be paid vast sums of money to prevent the NOC from carrying out its essential duties, the rest of the Libyan population suffers,” said Mustafa Sanalla, the corporation’s chairman. He lamented the loss of oil revenues and the “disastrous decay of our oil infrastructure” due to the shutdown, which is preventing maintenance work at facilities.

The Russian mercenaries are said to be employed by the Wagner Group, a Kremlin-backed private security company. The group has provided between 800-1,200 mercenaries to bolster Hifter’s 14-month offensive to capture Tripoli, according to U.N. experts, paying some fighters up to $1,500 a month. Moscow has repeatedly denied playing any role on Libya’s battlefields.

Hifter’s campaign largely collapsed earlier this month when Turkish-backed forces allied with the Tripoli government regained control of the capital’s entry and exit points and drove their rivals from a string of western towns. Turkey, the main patron of Tripoli forces, has also deployed mercenaries, mainly from Syria, to help defend the capital from Hifter’s assault.

Tripoli forces now say they’re mobilizing to retake Sirte, a strategic coastal city that would open the gateway to Libya’s vital oil fields and facilities. Hifter and his foreign backers, including Egypt, Russia and the United Arab Emirates, have pushed for a return to peace talks to avert a major escalation in the proxy war. Egypt last week warned that an attack on Sirte would trigger its direct military involvement in the conflict.

With global oil prices hitting historic lows because of the coronavirus pandemic and OPEC countries agreeing to slash production, Libya’s oil corporation has sharply criticized what it describes as the international community’s indifference to the shutdown.

“It is noteworthy that many countries are themselves benefiting from the absence of Libyan oil from global markets,” said Sanalla, the chairman. Some states, he added, are “working in the background to support blockading forces,” in reference to Russia.

The U.S. Embassy in Libya condemned the occupation by the oilfield by Wagner and other foreign mercenaries as part of “an unprecedented foreign-backed campaign to undermine Libya’s energy sector.”

Foreign powers meddling in oil-rich Libya are holding the country’s lucrative resources “hostage,” the embassy said, while ordinary Libyans continue to suffer from a crumbling economy.

Turkey accuses France of dragging Libya into ‘chaos’

Turkey accuses France of dragging Libya into ‘chaos’

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘A fundamental challenge’: William Barr says U.S. is cracking down on Chinese spying

Quiz: Do you remember these popular TV couples?

EXCLUSIVE: U.K. assassination attempt reveals illegal Russian chemical weapons push

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton; predicts historic economic recovery

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

Democrats recycle fascism with statue smashers, flag burners and book burners

Peter Morici

How a V-shaped economic recovery could happen

Cal Thomas

Toxic in Tulsa: Trump misses opportunity to heal and unify a divided nation

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By

Associated Press

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) – A Turkish government spokesman shot back at French President Emmanuel Macron and blamed France on Tuesday for allegedly “dragging Libya into chaos.”

Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman Hami Aksoy accused Macron of “losing reason” and of making unfounded accusations against Turkey a day after the French leader said Ankara was involved in a “dangerous game” in Libya.

Macron also urged President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Monday to end Turkey’s activities in the the conflict-torn country.

TOP STORIES

Shaun King says Jesus images 'a form of white supremacy' that must go: 'They should all come down'

'Not kidding around': Cuomo threatens to reinstate coronavirus shutdowns

Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke: Black Lives Matter 'will join forces' with Islamic State

“Due to the support it has given to illegitimate structures for years, France has an important responsibility in dragging Libya into chaos, and in this respect, it is France that plays a dangerous game in Libya,” Aksoy said in a statement.

The comments referred to France’s support of Libya’s eastern-based forces, which under Khalifa Hifter launched an April 2019 offensive to try to take the capital of Tripoli.

Turkey backs the U.N.-recognized Tripoli-based administration in Libya. The Tripoli administration’s forces, with Turkish military support, gained the upper hand in the war this month after retaking the capital’s airport, all main entrance and exit points to the city and a string of key nearby towns.

Aksoy added, “The people of Libya will never forget the damages France has inflicted on this country.”

The ministry spokesman also called on France to end steps that he said “put the security and future of Libya, Syria and the eastern Mediterranean under risk” and to enter into a dialogue with Turkey, a NATO ally.

Tensions between France and Turkey escalated following a June 10 incident between Turkish warships and a French naval vessel in the Mediterranean, which France considers a hostile act under NATO’s rules of engagement. Turkey has denied harassing the French frigate.

France accused Ankara of repeated violations of the U.N. arms embargo on Libya.

Libya has been in turmoil since 2011, when a NATO-backed uprising toppled leader Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed.

Italy, Germany, US seek Libya cease-fire after Egypt threat

Italy, Germany, US seek Libya cease-fire after Egypt threat

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘A fundamental challenge’: William Barr says U.S. is cracking down on Chinese spying

Quiz: Do you remember these popular TV couples?

EXCLUSIVE: U.K. assassination attempt reveals illegal Russian chemical weapons push

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton; predicts historic economic recovery

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Cal Thomas

Toxic in Tulsa: Trump misses opportunity to heal and unify a divided nation

Richard W. Rahn

Google and NBC try to censor free speech with ad bans for The Federalist and Zero Hedge

Michael McKenna

U.S. treating China like Russia after the Cold War was a big mistake

View all

Question of the Day

Would you vote by mail if given the option?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Print

By NICOLE WINFIELD

Associated Press

Monday, June 22, 2020

ROME (AP) – Italy, Germany and the United States pushed Monday for a cease-fire and de-escalation of tensions in Libya following a warning by Egypt that it would intervene militarily if Turkish-backed forces attack the strategic city of Sirte.

Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio and his German counterpart, Heiko Maas, said after talks in Rome that a cease-fire is urgent given the Egyptian threat. Di Maio also called for the quick naming of a new U.N. envoy and the strong enforcement of a U.N. arms embargo on Libya.

“If we stop the arrival of weapons, or strongly reduce them, we will be able to reduce the aggressiveness of the Libyan parties in this conflict,” Di Maio said.

TOP STORIES

NASCAR rejects advertising from gun companies, causing fans to question its 2nd Amendment stance

Lawyer: Black jurors should refuse to convict black people accused of murdering white people

Ben and Jerry's calls to 'defund the police,' 'dismantle the old system'

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi warned over the weekend that any attack on Sirte or the inland Jufra air base by Turkish-backed forces loyal to the U.N.-supported but weak government in Tripoli would amount to crossing a “red line.”

He said Egypt could intervene militarily with the intention of protecting its western border with the oil-rich country, and of bringing stability – including establishing conditions for a cease-fire.

The Tripoli-based government said it considered el-Sissi’s comments a “declaration of war,” while authorities in the east welcomed his support.

U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric told reporters on Monday that the world body’s search for a new U.N. envoy to Libya ran aground when the Trump administration blocked two of the secretary general’s nominations, saying it wants one senior official solely tasked with negotiating a cease-fire and another running the U.N. mission.

Acting U.N. envoy Stephanie Williams continues to shuttle between the warring sides and their foreign backers, he said, urging a de-escalation and resumption of the U.N.-facilitated political process.

“The last thing that Libya needs right now is more fighting, more military mobilization, more transfer of weapons, more presence of either foreign fighters or mercenaries on its soil,” Dujarric said, responding to Egypt’s threats of military intervention.

U.S. Army Gen. Stephen Townsend, head of Africa Command, and U.S. Ambassador Richard Norland meanwhile met Monday with Tripoli-based Prime Minister Fayez Sarraj in the Libyan capital, according to a statement from the U.S. Embassy.

It said the two U.S. officials stressed the “need for military pause and return to negotiations.”

“All sides need to return to U.N.-led ceasefire and political negotiations because this tragic conflict is robbing all Libyans of their future,” Townsend said.

Norland called for foreign countries supporting Libya’s rivals to stop “fueling the conflict, respect the U.N. arms embargo, and uphold commitments made at the Berlin Summit” earlier this year.

The German foreign minister said the Egyptian threat indicated that a further escalation was possible, making it “all the more urgent to agree on a cease-fire now.”

Di Maio, for his part, said Italy was prepared to provide even more contributions to a naval and air mission to enforce the U.N. arms embargo on Libya, saying it will be crucial even after a cease-fire is signed.

“In the coming days we will have talks with the Libyan parties to try to bring forward as soon as possible the signing of a cease-fire,” Di Maio said. “Even once there is a cease-fire, I think the (arms embargo) mission will continue to be important, because especially with a cease-fire, we have to limit the arrival of weapons in Libya.”

Italy is particularly concerned that any escalation of the conflict will unleash more waves of migrants onto smugglers’ boats headed for Italian shores. The coronavirus emergency in hard-hit Italy stemmed their arrivals, but authorities fear that the numbers will swell again with the health emergency easing and the return to the Mediterranean Sea of humanitarian rescue ships.

Libya has been in turmoil since 2011, when a civil war toppled long-time dictator Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed. The country has since split between rival administrations in the east and the west, each backed by armed groups and foreign governments.

Eastern-based forces under Khalifa Hifter launched an offensive to try to take Tripoli in April last year. Hifter’s forces are backed by the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Russia, while the Tripoli-allied militias are aided by Qatar, Italy and Turkey.

Dujarric said Hifter’s failed campaign to capture Tripoli set off a humanitarian crisis, with 1 million people in need of aid and almost a half million people internally displaced.

Tripoli-based forces with Turkish support gained the upper hand in the war earlier this month after retaking the capital’s airport, all main entrance and exit points to the city and a string of key towns near Tripoli. They threatened to retake Sirte, which could allow them to gain control oil fields and facilities in the south that Hifter seized earlier this year as part of his offensive on Tripoli.

With the recent retreat of Hifter’s forces from their last western stronghold of Tarhuna and the discovery of several mass graves in the area, calls have mounted for a transparent investigation into possible war crimes. Fatou Bensouda, the International Criminal Court prosecutor, said Monday that her office had received credible reports of eleven mass graves containing men, women and children.

In Geneva, the U.N.-backed Human Rights Council agreed unanimously on Monday to call for the immediate creation and deployment of a one-year fact-finding mission to document rights abuses and violations in Libya since 2016.

The 47-member-state body asked the U.N. human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet, to appoint experts for the mission and called on Libyan authorities to grant “unhindered access” to the country and the right to speak with anyone they choose.

Eric Goldstein, acting Middle East and North Africa director at Human Rights Watch, welcomed the step as “a wake-up call to warlords and armed groups that they could be held accountable for serious crimes committed by their rank and file.”

___

Associated Press writers Samy Magdy in Cairo, David Rising in Berlin, Edith M. Lederer at the United Nations and Jamey Keaten in Geneva contributed to this report.

Egyptian president says Libyan city Sirte a ‘red line’

Egyptian president says Libyan city Sirte a ‘red line’

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Robert Knight

Liberals attack on American culture emboldened by Supreme Court last week

Everett Piper

Supreme Court rules women are no longer real but just fantasies

Cheryl K. Chumley

Pandering to the pretensions of Black Lives Matter overlords

View all

Question of the Day

Should Trump rally-goers in Tulsa wear face masks

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

FILE – In this June 17, 2020, file photo, Turkey’s Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, left, and Muhammed Tahir Siyala, Foreign Minister of Libya’s internationally-recognized government, speak at the airport, in Tripoli, Libya. Libya’s eastern-based forces have lost the chance to … more >

Print

By SAMY MAGDY and ANDREW WILKS

Associated Press

Saturday, June 20, 2020

CAIRO (AP) – Egypt’s president Saturday warned that an attempt by Turkey-backed forces in Libya to attack the strategic city of Sirte would cross a “red line” and trigger a direct Egyptian military intervention into the conflict.

Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, in televised comments, said Egypt could intervene in neighboring Libya with the intention of protecting its western border with the oil-rich country, and to bring stability, including establishing conditions for a cease-fire, to Libya.

El-Sissi warned that any attack on Sirte or the inland Jufra air base by forces loyal to the U.N.-supported but weak government in Tripoli would amount to crossing a “red line.”

TOP STORIES

Ben and Jerry's calls to 'defund the police,' 'dismantle the old system'

Earthquake shakes Oklahoma after Trump's Tulsa rally

Pelosi rips Trump over testing remarks: 'The American people are owed answers'

“Let’s stop at this (current) front line and start negotiations to reach a political solution to the Libyan crisis,” he said.

Calls seeking comment from a spokesman for the Tripoli-based government went unanswered. But Mohammed Ammry Zayed, a member of the presidential council, an advisory body for the U.N.-supported government, said they reject el-Sissi’s comments as a “continuity of the war against Libya’s people.”

El-Sissi spoke while inspecting Egypt’s air force and commando units stationed in the Sidi Barrani air base in the country’s western region along the porous desert border with Libya.

He said Egypt is ready to provide arms and training for Libyan tribes to “defend their country.” He told tribal representatives attending his speech that if Egypt were to intervene, its forces would advance with tribal leaders at the vanguard.

El-Sissi’s strong comments come after Libyan fighters allied with the Tripoli-based government earlier this month advanced toward Sirte, a move that ignored an Egyptian initiative, backed by the east-Libya camp, to stop fighting and embark on peace talks.

Taking Sirte would open the gate for the Tripoli-allied militias to advance even farther eastward, to potentially seize control of vital oil installations, terminals and oil fields that tribes allied with Hifter shut down earlier this year, cutting off Libya’s major source of income.

Libya has been in turmoil since 2011 when a civil war toppled long-time dictator Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed. The country has since split between rival administrations in the east and the west, each backed by armed groups and foreign governments.

Eastern-based forces under Hifter launched an offensive to try to take Tripoli in April last year. The chaos has steadily worsened as foreign backers have increasingly intervened, despite pledges to the contrary at a high-profile peace summit in Berlin earlier this year.

Hifter’s forces are backed by the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Russia, while the Tripoli-allied militias are aided by Qatar, Italy and Turkey.

Tripoli-based forces with Turkish support gained the upper hand in the war earlier this month after retaking the capital’s airport, all main entrance and exit points to the city and a string of key towns near Tripoli. Turkish air support in the form of armed aerial drones in particular proved vital to turning the tide. Turkey has also sent Syrian militias to fight for the Tripoli government.

The withdrawal of Hifter’s fighters was painted by his commanders as a tactical measure to give a U.N.-backed peace process a chance.

But Turkey’s Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said Saturday that Hifter’s forces have lost the chance to engage in a political solution to the conflict because Hifter ignored previous calls for a peaceful solution.

“On the contrary, he increased his aggression,” Cavusoglu said in a televised news conference.

“He’s losing, he’s doomed to lose,” he added. “It’s impossible for him to win. He had an opportunity for a political process. He lost that as well.”

Turkey, in addition to providing military support, signed a maritime deal in November with the Tripoli-based government that would give Ankara access to an economic zone across the Mediterranean, despite the objections from Greece, Cyprus and Egypt. Turkey has said it will begin exploring for natural resources there within months.

Last weekend, a summit between Cavusoglu and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, which was to have focused on Libya, was postponed at the last minute.

___

Wilks reported from Ankara, Turkey.

Turkey says will work with Italy for Libya peace, slams EU

Turkey says will work with Italy for Libya peace, slams EU

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Tony Perkins

Justice Gorsuch botched Bostock v. Clayton County ruling on homosexual and transgender ‘rights’

David Keene

Bolton’s opinionated style never a good fit for Trump administration

Daniel N. Hoffman

Fighting the dark art of Russian disinformation this election season

View all

Question of the Day

Should Trump rally-goers in Tulsa wear face masks

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Turkey’s Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, right, and Italy’s Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio say goodbye by using their elbows after their joint press conference, in Ankara, Turkey, Friday, June 19, 2020.(Fatih Aktas/Turkish Foreign Ministry via AP, Pool) more >

Print

By SUZAN FRASER

Associated Press

Friday, June 19, 2020

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) – Turkey and Italy will continue to work for a lasting peace and political solution in Libya, Turkey’s foreign minister said Friday, while slamming the European Union’s naval operation in the Mediterranean that tries to enforce a U.N. arms embargo on the conflict-torn country.

Mevlut Cavusoglu made the comments during a joint news conference with his Italian counterpart Luigi Di Maio. Italy and Turkey support the U.N.-backed government that is based in Tripoli against the rival forces under the command of Khalifa Hifter, who is supported by France, Russia, Jordan, the United Arab Emirates and other key Arab countries.

Turkey says the EU’s naval operation – dubbed Irini – is focusing its efforts on the Tripoli-based administration and not enough on Hifter’s forces who launched an offensive in April 2019 to capture the capital.

TOP STORIES

Over 230 members of Oregon church get COVID-19

Trump rally grows into grand spectacle as crowd swells, controversy swirls

Portland mayor stands by decision to allow antifa to block traffic, hassle motorists

“We will continue to work with Italy for a last peace and a solution-oriented political process,” Cavusoglu told reporters, praising Italy for what he described as its “balanced stance” on Libya.

“Operation Irini is not balanced. It has never met any of the (Tripoli-based) Government of National Accord’s requests and concerns,” Cavusoglu said. He maintained that the operation ignores alleged “constant arms transfers to Hifter by France.”

Cavusoglu’s comments come amid growing tensions between Turkey and France over Libya. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said Thursday that the military alliance would investigate an incident between Turkish warships and a French naval vessel in the Mediterranean, as France accused Turkey of repeated violations of the U.N. arms embargo on Libya and branded Ankara an obstacle to securing a cease-fire there.

Di Maio said neither side in the Libyan conflict should have access to arms, adding that Rome welcomed indications that the sides were willing to negotiate.

He also defended the EU naval operation, describing it as “balanced.”

“The aim is to control the arrival of all armaments,” Di Maio said. “It is not a remedy for all ills, but at least it ensures that the embargo is observed.”

Libya has been in turmoil since 2011, when a NATO-backed uprising toppled leader Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed. The country has since been split between rival administrations in the east and the west, each backed by armed groups and different foreign governments.

Turkish military support to the U.N.-backed government has turned the tide in the conflict, driving back Hifter’s forces. Turkey has also sent Syrian militias to fight for the Tripoli government.

Russian jets now operating in Libya

Russian jets now operating in Libya

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

David Keene

Bolton’s opinionated style never a good fit for Trump administration

Daniel N. Hoffman

Fighting the dark art of Russian disinformation this election season

Scott Walker

Liberal media and Democrats fan the flames of civil rights ignorance

View all

Question of the Day

Should Trump rally-goers in Tulsa wear face masks

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

In this photo taken from Russian Defense Ministry official website on Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015, a Russian SU-24M jet fighter prepares to take off from an airbase Hmeimim in Syria. (AP Photo/ Russian Defense Ministry Press Service) **FILE** more >

Print

By Mike Glenn

The Washington Times

Thursday, June 18, 2020

At least 15 Russian combat aircraft are now operating in Libya to support Moscow-backed mercenary groups, U.S. military officials confirmed Thursday.

U.S. Africa Command said it has photographs of Russian jets taking off and operating near at least two locations in Libya — an airfield at al-Jufra near the country’s center and Sirte on the Libyan coast.

“Russia’s sustained involvement in Libya increases the violence and delays a political solution,” said Marine Corps Brig. Gen. Bradford Gering, Africa Command’s operations director. “Russia continues to push for a strategic foothold on NATO’s southern flank and this is at the expense of innocent LIbyan lives.”

TOP STORIES

Four St. Louis police officers charged with beating undercover colleague

Former defense official sentenced to 30 months for leaking classified info to journalists

EXCLUSIVE: Trump says Biden weaker than Hillary Clinton

In a briefing with defense writers, the head of U.S. Air Forces in Europe said he’s also concerned Russia is attempting to gain a permanent presence in Libya, similar to what they’ve done in Syria.

“That’s going to be a significant security concern,” Air Force Gen. Jeffrey Harrigan told reporters in Washington.

The Russian aircraft confirmed to be flying in Libya are the MiG-29, MiG-24 and Su-24, Gen. Harrigan said.

They’ve been unable to confirm whether the Russian jets have conducted any airstrikes while in Libya. U.S. officials also have a concern about the abilities of the mercenary pilots. Some may be retired pilots forced to learn new systems in a short time.

“They’re working on their basic flying skills,” Gen. Harrigan said.

They may not have the flying skills to distinguish ally from foe and that could be devastating in an environment where innocents are near a military target, Gen. Harrigan said.

“We train significantly to ensure we put the weapon where we need to,” he said.

Russia, Turkey postpone talks on Syria, Libya conflicts

Russia, Turkey postpone talks on Syria, Libya conflicts

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

Trump on renaming U.S. military bases honoring Confederate officers: No way!

Quiz: Can you name the actors who played these 1980s TV characters?

FBI picked most outlandish anti-Trump dossier claims for official U.S.-Russia report

Quiz: How well do you know your guns?

Summer spike? Experts warn of ‘reverse’ seasonal effect on coronavirus

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Michael McKenna

Flight from Democratic stronghold cities accelerates

Cal Thomas

When mob rule becomes the norm

Ralph Z. Hallow

Resisting arrest is Atlanta’s killer — and America’s

View all

Question of the Day

Should Confederate names be taken off U.S. military bases?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

This photo provided by the Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows a Syrian White Helmet civil defense worker walking amid the rubble of houses hit by airstrikes, in … more >

Print

By Lauren Meier

The Washington Times

Sunday, June 14, 2020

Russia and Turkey have postponed a series of talks that were expected to focus on their opposing roles in conflicts in Libya and Syria.

Libya — which has been locked in a civil war since 2014 — has gone without a stable government since a 2011 rebellion ousted and killed longtime dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Syria, meanwhile, is in its 10th year of a conflict that has forced over half of its population to flee their homes, while over 11 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, according to the United Nations.

TOP STORIES

Coronavirus tracers in New York City will not ask positive tests if they attended protests

Evangelical pastors pander to radical Black Lives Matter

'Bigger than life': George Floyd known for big heart, good works, struggles with drugs, crime

The Turkish foreign ministry said in a statement Sunday that the Russian and Turkish ministers “will continue contacts and talks in the period ahead. Minister-level talks will be held at a later date.”

The U.N. in recent years recognized a Libyan government in Tripoli born out of U.N.-mediated talks in 2015. Qatar and Italy have supported Tripoli, although Turkey has emerged as its biggest backer. On the other side, Russia, the United Arab Emirates, France and Egypt are seen to back rebel commander Khalifa Haftar.

Turkey and Russia, who back opposing sides in the ongoing Syrian civil war, agreed to a cease-fire in Idlib on March 5, but airstrikes in the region have resumed in recent weeks.

Pope Francis urges aid to migrants and end to Libya fighting

Pope Francis urges aid to migrants and end to Libya fighting

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

U.S. seeks role as China, India face off at border

Quiz: Name the famous inventors of these revolutionary products

Rod Rosenstein says he was led to believe the Carter Page FISA applications were accurate

Best states for concealed carry — ranked worst to first

EXCLUSIVE: Antifa planned anti-government insurgency for months, law enforcement official says

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Everett Piper

Evangelical pastors pander to radical Black Lives Matter

Cheryl K. Chumley

Seattle anarchists and their lunatic fringe list of demands

Charles Hurt

Trump and the riot of political plagues

View all

Question of the Day

Should Confederate names be taken off U.S. military bases?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Pope Francis leaves after celebrating a Corpus Domini Mass, inside St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican Sunday, June 14, 2020. (Tiziana Fabi/Pool Photo via AP) more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Sunday, June 14, 2020

VATICAN CITY (AP) – Pope Francis on Sunday urged political and military leaders in Libya to end their hostilities and called on the international community to take “to heart” the plight of migrants trapped in the lawless nation.

During his weekly blessing overlooking St. Peter’s Square, the pontiff called for “an end to the violence” and a path toward “peace, stability and unity’’ in the country.

He said thousands of migrants, refugees, asylum-seekers and internally displaced people are “more vulnerable to forms of exploitation and violence.”

TOP STORIES

Trump finalizes rule defining gender as a person's biological sex

NASCAR rejects advertising from gun companies, causing fans to question its 2nd Amendment stance

Four St. Louis police officers charged with beating undercover colleague

“There is cruelty,” the pope said, departing from prepared remarks. “We all have responsibility. No one can feel exempt.”

The Pope’s comments came as forces allied with a U.N.-supported government in the capital Tripoli are preparing to launch an attack on rival forces led by military commander Khalifa Hifter in the strategic coastal city of Sirte. If successful, it could help them seize key oil fields and facilities in Libya’s south.

Libya has been in turmoil since 2011 when a civil war toppled long-time dictator Moammar Gadhafi, who was later killed. The country has since split between rival administrations in the east and the west, each backed by armed groups and foreign governments.

Hifter’s forces launched an offensive on Tripoli in April 2019. The chaos in the oil-rich country has steadily worsened as foreign backers increasingly intervened, despite pledges to the contrary at a high-profile peace summit in Berlin earlier this year.

The Tripoli-based forces, backed by Turkey, gained the upper hand earlier this month after retaking the capital’s airport, all main entrance and exit points to the city and a string of key towns near Tripoli. That forced Hifter’s fighters to withdraw – defeats that commanders painted as a tactical measure to give the U.N.-backed peace process a chance.

After Gadhafi’s fall and killing, Libya also emerged as a major transit point for African and Arab migrants fleeing war and poverty to Europe.

Most migrants make the perilous journey in ill-equipped and unsafe rubber boats. The International Organization for Migration said its estimated death toll among migrants who tried to cross the Mediterranean in March passed the “grim milestone” of 20,000 since 2014.

On Saturday, the U.N. migration agency said a dozen people were missing and feared drowned after a boat carrying around three dozen migrants bound for Europe capsized in the Mediterranean Sea off the coastal town of Zawiya, about 48 kilometers (30 miles) west of Tripoli.

Separately, Tripoli-based prosecutors ordered Sunday the arrested of at least 14 Hifter-linked individuals for their alleged connections to mass graves that were discovered in the western town Tarhouna, which was captured from Hifter’s forces earlier this month.

The prosecutors said in a statement that a forensic team had been formed to identify the victims and determine when and how they died.

The mass graves have raised fears about the extent of human rights violations in territories controlled by Hifter’s forces, given the difficulties of documentation in an active war zone. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called for a transparent investigation. Tarhouna served as a main stronghold for Hifter’s forces in their 14-month campaign to capture Tripoli.

Erdogan, Trump reiterate solidarity against COVID-19

Erdogan, Trump reiterate solidarity against COVID-19

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

‘Not happy’: Trump eyes compensation from China as confrontations increase

Quiz: Are you a war movie expert?

Joe Biden bets big that suburban women won’t believe Tara Reade

Quiz: Can you pass a pandemics, plagues and infectious diseases test?

Combat vets lament military changing tobacco policy: ‘Government run amok’

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Everett Piper

Science-denying Joe Biden

Charles Hurt

Trump’s political education should make him wary

Daniel N. Hoffman

How the United States can effectively contain China

View all

Question of the Day

Would you undergo an elective surgery right now?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

In this photo provided by the Turkish Presidency, Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, front center, arrives to attend the inauguration ceremony for Basaksehir Pine and Sakura City Hospital, in Istanbul, Thursday, May 21, 2020. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe who … more >

Print

By

Associated Press

Saturday, May 23, 2020

ISTANBUL (AP) – Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and U.S. President Donald Trump spoke Saturday on the phone to discuss the coronavirus pandemic, bilateral relations and regional developments.

According to an account of the phone call released by Erdogan’s office, the two leaders reiterated their solidarity in the fight against COVID-19.

They also discussed developments in Libya and Syria, agreeing to continue “close political and military cooperation” for regional stability, the statement said.

TOP STORIES

Holiday amid pandemic: Americans divided on how to respond

500 doctors tell Trump to end the coronavirus shutdown, say it will cause more deaths

Sessions fires back at Trump: 'I did my duty & you're damn fortunate I did'

For its part, the White House said that the two leaders “discussed progress on reopening and boosting global economies in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.”

President Trump also “reiterated concern over worsening foreign interference in Libya and the need for rapid de-escalation” and the presidents “reaffirmed the urgent need for a political resolution to the conflict in Syria, as well as unimpeded humanitarian access throughout the country,” a White House statement said.

Turkey has seen a downward trajectory in infections and the death rate, but hundreds of people are still confirmed positive every day.

The country has registered 155,686 infections and 4,308 deaths.

Turkey’s transport minister said Saturday that some intercity trains will resume limited operations May 28 as the country readies to restart domestic tourism. Passengers will be required to obtain a travel certification code from a government phone application. Travelers above 65 and under 20 will also need to get an additional travel permit as a full curfew imposed on those age groups continues, except for a few hours each week.

Turkey is in the midst of its first ever nationwide lockdown, lasting four days during the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr. Previous partial lockdowns on weekends and holidays had affected a maximum of 31 of 81 provinces. Erdogan said this week he hopes this round of lockdowns will be the final one.

Separately, Turkey’s minister of youth and sports announced all quarantine measures for Turkish citizens coming from abroad had been completed. Since March, over 77,400 people were placed in mandatory quarantines in dormitories to curb the infection’s spread.

Turkey accuses five nations of forming ‘alliance of evil’

Turkey accuses five nations of forming ‘alliance of evil’

Follow Us




Search
Search Keyword:

Sign Up For Our
Daily Newsletters

Breaking News Alerts
Enter your email address:

Manage Newsletters

Front Page Podcast

Recommended

U.S. may benefit as grim spring undercuts Putin’s plans

Quiz: Can you pass a World War II history test?

First-term lawmakers face major challenges on Capitol Hill

Quiz: Can you pass a pandemics, plagues and infectious diseases test?

New transcripts reveal Loretta Lynch uninformed as FBI targeted Trump’s campaign

SPONSORED CONTENT

How To: Fix Dark Spots And Uneven Skin Tones

Commentary

Joseph Curl

FACT: NY Gov. Cuomo has done an absolutely abysmal job handling COVID-19

Grover Norquist

Ralph Northam now only exists to do the left’s bidding

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

Bringing back the good old days with Biden’s presidential basement campaign

View all

Question of the Day

Would you go to a sporting event this summer or fall?

Question of the Day

 
Yes

 
No

 
Not sure

  View results

Story TOpics

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, listens during a teleconference with his cabinet in Istanbul, Monday, May 11, 2020. Erdogan announced a new four-day curfew to stem infections, that includes the weekend and a public holiday on May 19. The country … more >

Print

By SUZAN FRASER

Associated Press

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) – Turkey on Tuesday accused Greece, Cyprus, Egypt, France and the United Arab Emirates of seeking to form an “alliance of evil” after these countries issued a joint declaration denouncing Ankara’s policies in the eastern Mediterranean and Libya.

In a strongly-worded statement, Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman Hami Aksoy said the five countries were pursuing “regional chaos and instability” in the eastern Mediterranean and sacrificing Libyans’ “hope for democracy for the reckless aggression of dictators.”

The foreign ministers of the five countries held a teleconference on Monday to discuss the situation in the eastern Mediterranean, where Turkey has been drilling for potential hydrocarbon deposits in an offshore area where Cyprus has exclusive economic rights, as well as the situation in Libya.

TOP STORIES

Richard Grenell declassifies list of Obama officials who 'unmasked' Flynn: Report

Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history

Democrats unveil $3 trillion-plus coronavirus spending package

Last year, Turkey signed a contested maritime border delineation deal as well as a military cooperation agreement with the internationally-recognized government in Tripoli.

Turkey says the deal grants its economic rights to a large swath of the east Mediterranean Sea and prevents any energy-related projects from moving forward without Ankara’s consent. Greece and Cyprus have protested the deal, saying it contravenes international law and infringes on their own rights in the area.

The five nations denounced what they said was Turkey’s sixth attempt in less than a year to “illegally conduct drilling operations in Cyprus’ maritime zones.”

Turkey doesn’t recognize ethnically divided Cyprus as a state and claims much of its exclusive economic zone as its own. It has dispatched warship-escorted vessels off Cyprus to drill for gas, insisting that it’s acting to protect its interests and those of Turkish Cypriots to the area’s natural resources.

Cyprus was split in 1974 when Turkey invaded after coup by supporters of union with Greece. A breakaway Turkish Cypriot state is recognized only by Turkey.

The five also protested the agreements signed with Libya’s U.N.-backed government as a violation of international law and the U.N. arms embargo in Libya.

”(The) Ministers strongly condemned Turkey’s military interference in Libya, and urged Turkey to fully respect the UN arms embargo, and to stop the influx of foreign fighters from Syria to Libya. These developments constitute a threat to the stability of Libya’s neighbors in Africa as well as in Europe,” the five nations declared.

In its response, the Turkish Foreign Ministry accused Greece and Cyprus of avoiding dialogue with Turkey and faulted Egypt for not protecting the rights and interests of its own people. It also charged the UAE of joining the others out of hostility against Turkey and blamed France for allegedly seeking to act as a “patron” to the alliance.

“We call on these countries to act in line with common sense, international laws and practices,” said Aksoy, the Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman. “Peace and stability in the region can be established with sincere and genuine dialogue, not through alliances of evil.”

__

Associated Press Writer Menelaos Hadjicostis in Nicosia, Cyprus contributed.